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Full text of "Minutes of the Stony Fork Missionary Baptist Association"

1330 Annual 




HtHBtotiarg 
lajtttat Aaaortatton 

J^artlf OlaroUna 



MIMGTES 
of the 

STONY FORK MISSIONARY 
BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 
NORTH CAROLINA 
1990 

ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-NINTH ANNUAL SESSION 

Held With 
Rock Spring, August 10, 1990 

and with 

Sandy Flat, August 11, 1990 



The one hundred and thirtieth session will be held with Bailey Camp on Friday, 
August 9, 1991 and at Boone Fork on Saturday, August 10, 1991. 



STOMY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Suggested Order of Business 3 

Officers for Association 4 

Presenters of Reports 5 

Messengers to Meeting 5 

Constitution 6 

Proceedings 14 

Cooperative Program Report 14 

Home Missions 15 

Out of Business Churches 16 

Biblical Recorder 17 

Retirement Homes 18 

Christian Higher Education 19 

Baptist College Report 21 

Annual Message 22 

Baptist Foundation 23 

Treasurer Report 25 

Proposed Budget 1990-91 26 

Vacation Bible School 26 

Foreign Missions 26 

Sunday School Report 27 

Christian Action League 28 

Church and Community Assistance 29 

Temperance and Morals Report 30 

State Missions 30 

Stewardship Report 31 

Discipleship Training 31 

Women's Missionary Union 32 

Annual Message 52 

Director of Missions Report 33 

General Board Report 33 

Obituaries 33 

Executive Report 34 

Historical Table 35 

Tables 39 



STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 5 



PRESENTERS OF REPORTS 

Vacation Bible School Edwana Smith 

Cooperative Program Pauline Eldreth 

Home Missions Vera Dula 

Children's Homes Jeri Triplett 

Baptist Hospital Linda Church 

Retirement Homes Mamie Craig 

Christian Education Edith Gryder 

Baptist Foundation Dale Luttrell 

State Missions Charles Smith 

Foreign Missions Scott Church 

Temperance & Morals (CAL) Sharon Craig 

Brotherhood Dennis Oakes 

Biblical Recorder Lloyd Buckner 

Obituaries Clerk 

Resolutions Betty Woods 

Program Commitee: Edith Gryder. George Berry, Linda Mills 



Finance Committee: Edith Gryder, Dale Luttrell, Linda Mills, Roy Gryder 
Missions Committee: Director of Missions and Pastors of each Church 
Nominating Committee: Pastors of each Church, will elect a Chairman 



MESSENGERS TO ANNUAL ASSOCIATION MEETING 

Bailey Camp: Roy Gryder, Edith Gryder 

Boone Fork: Lloyd Buckner, Rosetta Hollifield, Dale Luttrell 
Doe Ridge: Junior Eldreth, Pauline Eldreth, Wanda Winkler 
Laytown: Nadine Holt, Vera Dula, Sandra Church, Charles Smith 
Long Ridge: Ronald Woodie, David Anthony, George Berry 
Mt. Ephraim: None 

Rock Spring: Carroll Woods, Betty Woods, Bea Whitson, Scott Church, Linda 

Church, Opal Cox 
Sandy Flat: Max West, Barbara West, Charles Craig, Doris Tester 



6 



STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



CONSTITUTION 

OF THE STONY FORK MISSIONARY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION (PROPOSED) 

PREAMBLE 

For the declaration of its fundamental purposes and the permanent guidance 
and control of its activities, the body does adopt the following as its constitution, 
to wit: 



ARTICLE I— Name and Membership 

Section 1 . This body shall be known as the Stony Fork Missionary Baptist 
Association of North Carolina. 

Section 2. The Association shall be composed of Missionary Baptist Churches. 

Section 3. Any Baptist Church may be admitted into this Association upon 
recommendation of the Committee of Petitionary Letters and Constitution of the 
Churches Committee and the majority vote of members present at any meeting as 
prescribed in Article IX. 

Section 4. Any Church at her discretion, may withdraw from this body. 

Section 5. This Association may at any meeting, after an investigation and 
report of a duly authorized committee of the Association, by a majority vote declare 
a dissolution of union with any church deemed corrupt, either in doctrine or practice. 

Section 6. Each church shall elect its messengers to the Annual Associational 
meeting. Each messenger must be certified in the annual church letter to the Associ- 
ation and must be appointed on the following ratio: Five messengers, in addition 
to the pastor, for each church having a membership not exceeding fifty, and one 
additional messenger for each increase of fifty. In no case shall the total number of 
messengers exceed ten for any given church. In addition to the pastor. 

Section 7. When any church shall fail to be represented by letter or messenger 
for two consecutive years, the missions committee shall confer with church, and if 
satisfactory reason is not given, and there is no evidence that said church wishes to 
keep alive their affliation with the Association, the committee shall bring its findings 
to the next Executive Committee Meeting, the Association shall at that time by a 
majority of present members shall vote to withdraw fellowship. The Association 
recognizes the right of any affiliated church to withdraw its fellowship from the 
Association. 

Section 8. The Annual Associational meeting shall convene on Friday at 
9:00 a.m.. Recess from 12:00 noon to 1:10 p.m. for the noon meal and adjourn 
on or before 4:00 p.m. It shall reconvene at 9:00 a.m. on Saturday and adjourn 
at the completion of business for the noon meal. This following the first Sunday 
in August. 

ARTICLE ll-Purpose 

Section 1. The prime purpose of the Association shall be to counsel together 
for the enlargement and strengthening of God's kingdom and to promote unity and 
growth among the churches composing it. 

Section 2. It shall be the purpose of this Association to enlist all of the churches 
into full cooperation with the North Carolina Baptist State Convention and the 
Southern Baptist Convention and their agencies in the work of missions, evangelism , 
christian education and social service. 



STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



7 



ARTICLE 1 1 1— Powers and Perogatives 
Section 1. The Association, when convened in meeting, shall sit as an advisory 
council and shall have no power to infringe on any of the internal rights or affairs 
of the member churches. It may advise however, with the member churches and 
recommend measures of usefulness for their adoption or rejection. 

Section 2. When grievances occur between any member of minority group of 
any church which is a member of the Association, the Association, the Executive 
Committee, or Missions Committee, or the committee designated by and acting for 
either of these bodies, may advise or give aid in matters which do not infringe on the 
rights of the local church, and this only on the invitation of the individual or group 
involved. 

Section 3. Any church found unfaithful to the faith and practices common to 
the Association, as outlined in Addendum I— ARTICLES OF FAITH (The Baptist 
Faith and Message as adopted by the Southern Baptist Convention in 1963) shall be 
encouraged to correct such errors, if the conduct of said church is not corrected and 
is of such nature as to alienate said church from the orderly and faithful churches 
of the Association, the Executive Committee of the Association can recommend 
that fellowship be withdrawn from said church, and upon a majority vote of the 
messengers in an Annual session, fellowship with such church can be withdrawn. 
(See Article I, Section 7) 

ARTICLE IV— The Executive Committee 

Section 1. The Association shall have an Executive Committee to serve as the 
Association between Annual Meetings, assisting in the overall work of the Association 
with such limitations as may be imposed by the constitution. 

Section 2. The Executive committee shall be composed of the Associational 
officers and the Pastors, and the Chairman of Deacons along with two elected lay 
persons from each church. Sixteen members shall constitute a quorum. The names 
of these persons shall be furnished annually to the Associational Clerk, if changes 
occur during the Associational year, these changes shall be forwarded to the Clerk. 

Section 3. At the beginning of each Executive Committee Meeting, a roll call 
will be taken of each church and its representatives. 

Section 4. The Executive Committee shall meet within two weeks after the 
Annual Associational Meeting, the second Sunday of November, March, and July. 
These meetings shall be held in churches of the Association, consecutively, in Alpha- 
betical order. 

ARTICLE V-Officers 

Section!. The officers of this body shall be: Moderator, Vice-Moderator, 
Clerk, Treasurer, Sunday School Director, Church Training Director, Brotherhood 
Director, W.M.U. Director, Vacation Bible School Director, Music Director, Pianist, 
Evangelism Director, and Youth Coordinator. 

Section 2. The officers of the Association shall be elected at each regular 
Annual Associational Meeting. The Nominating Committee shall fill vacancies that 
may occur in their respective categories between annual meetings of the association 
by bringing names to the Executive Committee for their approvaU 

Section 3. By the virtue of the office, the Associational Director of Missions 
is considered an ex-officio member of all Associational Committees. For all quali- 
fications and terms of office see Article VII , Section 1 . 



8 



STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATIOM 



ARTICLE VI~Duties of Officers 

Section 1. It shall be the duty of the Moderator of the Association to preside 
over the Annual Sessions, special sessions, and at the quarterly meetings of the 
Executive Committee. As the presiding officer, he shall open the meetings punc- 
tually at the appointed time, enforce the rules, preserve order, and exercise all the 
perogatives of a presiding officer according to the principles of established parli- 
mentary usage. He shall provide leadership for a progressive ideal throughout the 
association. He shall be elected for a one year term, and he shall not succeed himself 
for a maximum of two full terms. He shall appoint in advance any other committees 
he may deem necessary or advisable. Each of these committees shall report at the 
Annual Meeting for which they are appointed. It shall be the responsibility of the 
Moderator to call any needed meetings at any time he deems necessary. The Moder- 
ator is considered an ex-officio member of all committees. 

Section 2. It shall be the duty of the Vice-Moderator to discharge the duties 
of the Moderator in his absence or at his request. 

Section 3. It shall be the duty of the Clerk to keep an accurate record of the 
proceedings of the Association in regular and special sessions; to keep accurate 
records of quarterly meetings of the Executive Committee; to keep on file the printed 
minutes and other important documents belonging to the Association; to furnish 
the churches with the blank letter forms on which to make the annual reports to the 
association; to superintend the printing of the minutes, and to distribute them to 
the churches as soon after adjournment as possible. For this service the clerk shall 
be paid annually an amount recommended by the Finance Committee and approved 
by the association. 

Section 4. _ It shall be the duty of the Treasurer to receive all funds of the assoc- 
iation and to disburse the same in accordance with the budget of the associatlon^oj; 
for the purposes tojLAidiicfiJJie-iuiids w ere contributed. To re nder to the association 
an itemiyed repnrt _Q£_the.j-&c£LDts^and-disburseme nts at the fi rst session of the annual 
meeting. In the treasurers absence a member of the.Fixiaace Committee shall give the 
^port. The Treasurer shall make available through the associational newsletter a 
^quarterly report including the contributions of each church in the association. _A^ 
_quarterJ_y._r_epQrt shall be made available at the quarterly meetings of the Executive^ 
Committee. For this service, the treasurer shall be paid annually an amount rec- 
ommended by the Finance Committee and approved by the association. 

Section 5. Thc^unday School Director shall take the initiative in promoting 
inspirational meetings, study courses, and leadership classes for the churches of the 
association. He shall work in cooperation with the denominational Sunday School 
Agencies in promoting the denominational programs; and he will be responsible for 
coordinating and promoting Vacation Bible School work in conjunction with the 
Vacation Bible Director. He shall also work with the Nominating Committee in 
enlisting leadership for his organization. 

Section 6. The Church Tra.ning Director shall take the initiative in promo'.ing 
the regular meetings projected by the State Convention and be available to the 
churches for help in strengthening the established unions and encourage the organi- 
zation of new unions in churches without them. He shall also work with the Nomi- 
nating Committee in enlisting leadership for his organization. 

Section 7. The Brotherhood Director shall be responsible for promoting mis- 
sionary education within our association and be available to the churches to assist 
in strengthening organizations and programs of existing units. He shall also work 
with the Nominating Committee in enlisting leadership for his organization. 

Section 8. Thr WMU Director shall be responsible for promoting missionary 



STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



9 



education within our association and she shall be available to the churches to assist 
in promoting and establishing new Baptist Women and Baptist Women Auxiliary 
units, and shall assist in strengthening the organizations and programs of existing 
units. She shall also work with the Nomination Committee in enlisting leadership 
for her organization. 

Section 9. The Vacation Bible Director shall work in conjunction with the 
Associational Sunday School Director in enlisting and training workers, planning and 
organizing for the annual Vacation Bible School Clinic. 

Section 10. The Music Director shall take the initiative in promoting the meetings 
and activities suggested by the state music leadership and be available to the churches 
to help in strengthening their music programs. The music director will also be respon- 
sible for the music at the Associational and Executive Committee Meetings. He 
shall also work with the Nominating Committee in enlisting leadership for his organ- 
ization. 

Section! 1. The Pianist will be responsible for playing the piano at all Associa- 
tional and Executive Committee meetings. 

Section 12. The Evangelism Chairman will work with the Evangelism programs 
In planning, promoting, and coordinating all Evangelistic activities for the associa- 
tion in conjunction with the Director of Missions. 

ARTICLE Vll-Director of Missions 
Statement of Purpose and Position Title: 

The office or position will be known as the Director of Missions for the Stony Fork 
Missionary Baptist Association. The Director of Missions shall provide responsible 
leadership in the work of the association through performing such basic functions 
as the planning, correlation, and implementation of programs, program services, and 
ministries of the association; counsel the churches; agencies of needs, problems, and 
potentialities within the association; and interpret to the churches the program 
resources and other assistance available from the Baptist State Convention and 
Southern Baptist Convention agencies. 
Section 1. RESPONSIBILITIES 

A. Planning and Coordination 

1. Lead the association in strategy planning; establishing and maintaining a 
long-range program. Lead the association to set goals and encourage the churches 
to work toward them. 

2. Coordinate the associational work and meetings by serving as ex-officio 
member of all committees. 

3. Work with program officers and the Nominating Committee in selecting 
and enlisting leaders for organizations and committees of the association. 

4. Counsel, encourage, and lead in training the associational officers. 

B. Education and Promotion 

1. Seek to assist the pastors and the churches in programs suitable for their 
growth and development, recognizing the differences in size and diversity of member- 
ship, utilizing persuasion to promote fellowship and cooperation. 

2. Seek out in cooperation with the Missions Committee places of missions 
need and seek to enlist an appropriate church to meet these needs. In the event no 
church(es) can be enlisted, upon the instruction of the Missions Committee, the 
Director of Missions may lead in such a program in the name of the Stony Fork 
Baptist Association. 

3. Promote church organizational programs: Sunday School, Church Training, 



10 



STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



Church Music, Brotherhood, WMU, and Vacation Bible School and Leadership 
Training. 

4. Promote church assistance programs: Evangelism, Stewardship, and Family 

Life. 

5. Plan for and promote simultaneous efforts, such as: World Missions 
Conferences, revival crusades, enlargement campaigns, training schools, etc. 

6. Prepare in cooperation with the Missions Committee an annual associa- 
tional calendar. Prepare a monthly associational newsletter for distribution in the 
association. 

7. Attend denominational meetings and conferences as budget and time 
considerations permit. 

8. Report to the executive boards at its regular meetings and to the associ- 
ation in annual session. 

C. Service Ministry 

1 . Provide counsel and help as requested by pastors and churches. 

2. Serve as pulpit supply, assist in church surveys, and conduct studies and 
revivals as requested in keeping with terms of employment. Pulpit supply for a 
period of 4 weeks. 

3. Manage the associational office, supervise associational employees, and 
maintain equipment of the association. 

4. Cooperate with the Finance Committee in planning the budget and pro- 
moting giving to the association. 

5. Establish and announce office hours to best utilize the division of time 
between the associational office and field responsibilities. 

6. Always working through the pastor, the Director of Missions will be 
available to offer aid to churches in need of assistance. No program will be con- 
ducted for a church without the invitation of the pastor and/or church. In the 
event the church is without a pastor, the Director of Missions will respond to requests 
from the church leadership. 

Section 2. TERMS OF EMPLOYMENT 

A. Term of Office-The Director of Missions shall be called for an indefinite term 
of service. 

B. Remuneration-Remuneration will be recommended by the Missions and 
Finance Committees and approved by the Stony Fork Baptist Association. 

C. Honorariums-Honorariums received for pulpit supply, weddings, funerals, 
revivals, and pastoral service, not directly related to his normal responsibilities, shall 
be considered personal remuneration. 

D. Work Schedule-Work schedules will vary, with weekends normally being 
kept for services in churches in the association. 

E. Work Accountability-The Missions Committee pledges itself to a ministry of 
loyalty, support, and loving encouragement of the Director of Missions, so that 
under the leadership of the Spirit of God, he may render the most effective service 
possible. 

F. Both parties must give a thirty day notice before termination. 
Sections. QUALIFICATIONS 

A. Spiritual— A commited Christian with a sense of definite call to mission service. 

B. Educational— Preferably college and seminary degrees, or their equivalent. 

C. Special Knowledge and Skills— Knowledge of Baptist denominational life and 
a willingness to continue to learn; vision, flexibility, and demonstrated leadership 
ability in planning, conducting, and evaluating the work of the association. 

D. Character— Christian integrity. 



STOMY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATIOM 



E. Experience— Pastoral ministry, Christian education or associational and other 
mission experience are necessary. Preferably the associational experience should be 
as a director of missions, associational staff member or as an active and responsible 
officer in an association. The mission experience may be in the establishment of and 
involvement in mission outreach and ministry in a mission, church or association. 

ARTICLE Vlll-Committees and Their Duties 

Section 1. The committee of time, place and preacher shall be composed of 
three members. It shall be the duty of the committee to recommend to the associ- 
ation, the churches where the next session will be held, preferably to be taken in 
alphabetical order, and also the preacher for the annual session. In order to alleviate 
any hardship on any one church hosting as associational meeting, it is suggested that 
two churches may jointly host each meeting. Expenses, meeting places, and other 
arrangements will be coordinated by the churches selected. 

Section 2. The committee on Resolutions shall be composed of two members. 
It shall be the duty of this committee to draw up and present to the association 
suitable resolutions of appreciation and expressions of sentiments on any matter 
chosen by the committee or as directed by the messengers of the association. 

Section 3. The Program Committee shall be composed of the general officers 
of the association. It shall be the duty of this committee to prepare and present a 
suggested order of business to be adopted by the association. When adopted, the 
program becomes the order of business unless changed by common consent or by 
the vote of the body. 

Section 4. The committee of Nominations shall be composed of five members. 
It shall be the duty of the committee to prepare for the association the names of 
individuals as nominees for the following offices and reports: Moderator, Vice- 
Moderator, Treasurer, Clerk, Sunday School Director, Church Training Director, 
Music Director, Vacation Bible School Director, Brotherhood Director, Pianist, 
Evangelism Director, and Associational State Representatives, also persons for the 
following reports shall also be selected; Home Missions, State Missions, Foreign 
Missions, Stewardship, Cooperative Program, Obituaries, Temperance and Morals, 
V.B.S. Report, W.M.U. Report, Sunday School Report, and any others designated 
by the association. Representatives for the following shall be selected: N.C. Baptist 
Hospital, N.C. Childrens Home, Baptist Home for the Aging, Denominational Colleges 
(Christian Education), Denominational Literature (Religious Literature), Annuity 
Board, Baptist Foundation, and any others designated by the association. The com- 
mittee on Nominations shall be responsible for selection and contacting each of 
these persons for their approval before the annual meeting. The floor shall be open 
for nominations for these offices on the day of the annual meeting. Nominations 
from the floor shall be taken first, then the Chairperson of the Nominating 
Committee shall give nomination of committee. All nominees must be contacted 
beforehand and permission given for acceptance of nomination. The W.M.U. will 
elect their officers. 

Section 5. The Finance Committee shall be composed of five members, one of 
which will include the Treasurer of the associatio n. It shall be the duty or tnis com- - ^ 
mittee to prepare and recommend a budget for the association and to suggest ways 1^ 
and means whereby the budget can be raised by the local churches and to secure J/^^ 
the cooperation of the churches in raising the budget. The Financ e committee will 
pr esent the proposed budget on the first day of the annual associational meeting 
with discussion and adoption scheduled for the second day. The Finance Com- 



mittee shall meet prior to the quarterly Executive Committee Meeting and shal l 



12 



STOrSY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



prepare on a regular f orm acceptable to the association, a detailed financial report 
•^^WTTicTTwTlT be given to e ach member pres ent at the q uarterl y meetings and the annua l 
associationai meeting. 

Section 6. The Missions Committee shall be composed of five members and this 
committee shall report to and cooperate with the Executive Committee of the 
association. The duties of this committee are: (a) to coordinate and help promote 
through the organizations and committees all phases and activities of the associationai 
programs, (b) to cooperate with the local churches in making surveys of areas which 
in the opinion of the Missions Committee are being adequately served by the local 
missionary Baptist work, and to promote and develop those new phases of the 
Missions programs, (c) to serve in advisory capacity to the Director of Missions in 
all matters pertaining to his work and to serve with him in directing and promoting 
the missions programs of the association, (d) to provide information and assistance 
to the departments of State Missions of the North Carolina Baptist Convention in 
meeting local missionary needs, such as Missionary pastor's assistance, promoting 
mission's causes, etc., (e) the Missions Committee shall meet prior to the Executive 
Committee of the Association or at any time necessary to discharge its duties, (f) 
this committee shall have the following responsibilities relating to the office of 
Director of Missions: 

1 . Serve as a search committee for a Director of Missions. 

2. Recommend to the Executive Committee the name of the nominee. 

3. Coordinate financial matters with the Baptist State Convention. 

4. Serve as a liaison between the churches and the Director of Missions. 
Section 7. The Constitution and By-Laws Committee shall be composed of the 

Missions Committee and one selected layperson of the association making six mem- 
bers. It shall be the duty of this committee to review and update the Constitution 
and By-Laws as it becomes necessary. This committee will recommend revisions 
and amendments concerning the constitution and By-laws to the association as 
deemed necessary. They shall meet at least once a year before the annual meeting 
to review and discuss the constitution. 

Section 8. The committee of Petitionary Letters and Constitutions of the churches 

ARTICLE IX— Petitionary Letters and Constitutions of the Churches 

The Committee of Petitionary Letters and Constitutions of the Churches shall 
be made up of the Missions Committee members. 

Section 1. Any group of baptized believers in Christ desiring to organize them- 
selves into a missionary Baptist church with the purpose of seeking the recognition 
of and fellowship and cooperate with this association, shall be required to fulfill 
the following requirements. They shall submit their request for admission to the 
Director of Missions or the Moderator of the Association, who will in turn forward 
It to the Committee of Petitionary Letters. In addition to the letter of request, 
a church must also furnish a report of work accomplished since its organization, 
a copy of the church covenant, and its articles of faith. 

Section 2. Any church seeking admission into the fellowship of the Association 
must be under the watchcare of the Association for a period of one year before it 
can be admitted. During this interim period, the church shall be expected to have 
part in the support of the causes fostered by the association. The North Carolina 
State Convention and the Southern Baptist Convention. 

Section 3. The findings of the Committee on Petitionary Letters shall be reported 
at the annual associationai meeting or at the Executive Committee meeting with a 
recommendation either for or against admission. 



STOHY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



13 



Section 4. If the church is accepted under the watchcare of the association, 
the Committee on Petitionary Letters shall recommend at the end of the year that 
the church be accepted into full fellowship provided that examination of that years 
work done and a study of the cooperative spirit of that church proves to be in 
accordance to the principles of the churches of the association. A two-thirds majority 
vote of the Messengers or Executive Committee members present shall be needed 
for such an action to be completed. There will be an appropriate program conducted 
during the annual meeting to formally welcome this new church into the association. 

Section 5. For a sister cooperative Missionary Baptist church that is affliated 
with the Southern Baptist Convention, that wishes to join or transfer status, the same 
procedure is needful with the exception of the one year of assoclational watchcare. 
Upon receipt of letter of request, the Committee of Petitions shall recommend its 
findings to the Executive Committee, and after a thirty day period of investigation 
the discretion of the Executive Committee shall be used if immediate acceptance of 
fellowship is possible. If accepted, a program of welcoming shall be presented at 
the annual assoclational meeting. 

ARTICLE X-Amendments 
The constitution or any part of the constitution shall be amended at the annual 
assoclational meeting in August, with the acceptance by two-thirds majority vote. 
It is suggested that all changes and recommendations of amendments be submitted 
two months prior to annual meeting in August, to the Constitution and By-Laws 
Committee for their careful consideration; however, any messenger has the right 
to submit proposed changes in accordance with this article. 
By-Laws 

1 . All assoclational meetings shall be opened and closed in prayer. 

2. "Roberts Rules of Order," shall be used as a guideline for parlimentary pro- 
cedure in all assoclational meetings. The Moderator will be responsible for having 
a copy of same at all meetings and a copy of parlimentary procedure and the gavel 
of the association shall be transferred upon succession of the moderator. 

3. All assoclational officers shall exercise authority over their departments and 
shall give a financial accounting to the Finance Committee for monies expended. 

4. Election and installation of officers shall take place on the last day of the 
annual assoclational meeting in August, and these officers shall be responsible for 
planning, coordinating, and providing leadership for the coming year in the associ- 
ation. 

AMENDMENT TO CONSTITUTION AND BYLAWS 

Time, Place and Preacher Committee will be amended to the hosting church 
pastor or a preacher of his choice will be the preacher for the assoclational meetings. 
Committee membership will be filled according to the number of people par- 
ticipating in assoclational work. 

AMENDMENT TO CONSTITUTION AND BYLAWS 

Article Vlll Committees and their duties, Section 4. Amended to: 
recommendations from the PHominating Committee shall be presented first, then 
nominations will be taken from the floor. 



14 



STOMY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



PROCEEDINGS 

The one hundred and twenty-ninth annual meeting of the Stony Fork Missionary 
Baptist Association was called to order by George Berry, Moderator, at 9:00 a.m. 
on August 10, 1990 at Rock Spring Baptist Church. 

Charles Smith, song leader, led the congregation in singing, "Victory in Jesus." 
Devotion was led by Burl Jones from Hebrews 12:1-3. 

The program was adopted with revisions to be made as necessary for the con- 
venience of the speakers and presenters. 

Roll Call: Bailey Camp 3, Boone Fork 5, Doe Ridge 2, Laytown 4, Long Ridge 
5, Mt. Ephriam 0, Rock Spring 9, Sandy Flat 3, Other 1 , for a total of 32 members 
present. 

Recognition of Mew Pastors: George Berry (Long Ridge) and Bill Wright (Boone 
Fork). 

New Worker: Lloyd Buckner (Boone Fork). 

New Worker in WMU: Vera Dula (Laytown) and Pauline Berry (Long Ridge). 

The following reports were presented, moved for adoption and approved for 
inclusion in the minutes. 



COOPERATIVE PROGRAM 

Who receives Cooperative Program funds? Thirty-eight state conventions 
receive Cooperative Program funds from the churches in order to conduct the 
ministries approved by their churches. 

There are twenty agencies that carry out their work with these funds. The 
churches undergrid all these agencies through the Cooperative Program and these 
agencies are the channel through which people are reached for Christ. 

From January 1 through December 31 , 1989, the Stony Fork Association gave 
$ 1 1 ,488.96 to the Cooperative Program. There were seven churches who gave this 
amount. 

This year from January 1 through June 1, 1990, the churches have given 
$3,913.96. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Pauline Eldreth 



COOPERATIVE PROGRAM RECEIPTS 
AND SPECIAL OFFERINGS 

Gifts through the Cooperative Program actually received by business office 
of the Baptist State Convention for the period listed below. 

Check this with your church records and please report any difference to O. 
D. Martin, Jr., P. O. Box 1107, Gary, NC 27512. 

Special offerings from the churches for Baptist causes shown as designated. 



STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



15 



January 1 through June 30, 1990 

Cooperative Program Designated 







Total to 










Current 


Date 


To Date 


C u r r e nt 


To Date 


Church Mames 


Quarter 


Above 


Last Year 


Quarter 


Above 


Stony Fork 












Bailey Camp 


.00 


.00 


.00 


.00 


.00 


Boone Fork 


.00 


100.00 


.00 


600.00 


600.00 


Doe Ridge 


107.05 


151.05 


193.64 


.00 


.00 


Laytown 


200.00 


600.00 


.00 


.00 


.00 


Long Ridge 


230.00 


516.91 


424.65 


74.37 


379.28 


Mount Ephriam 


391.00 


784.87 


484.00 


.00 


.00 


Mount Paron 


.00 


.00 


.00 


.00 


.00 


Mount View 


.00 


.00 


.00 


.00 


,00 


New Hopewell 


.00 


.00 


.00 


.00 


.00 


Rock Springs 


1,150.46 


1,712.97 


2,356.79 


719.45 


787.67 


Rock View 


.00 


.00 


.00 


.00 


.00 


Sandy Flat 


48.16 


48.16 


52,83 


1.558.06 


1,558.06 


Other Than Church 


.00 


.00 


.00 


.00 


.00 


TOTAL 


2,126.67 


3,913.96 


3,51 1,91 


2,951.88 


3,325.01 



HOME MISSIONS 

Acts 1:18 

A well-known legend tells of a scrawny little sparrow lying on his back in the 
nniddle of the road. A traveler comes along and asks the sparrow what he is doing 
lying upside down. "I heard the heavens are going to fall today," said the sparrow. 
"Oh," said the man, "and I suppose your spindly legs can hold up the heavens." 
"One does what one can," said the sparrow, "one does what one can." 

No one missionary is responsible for spreading the good news to everyone 
in this nation, but each of us must do what we can. Southern Baptist Convention 
churches could not operate without volunteers, Sunday school teachers, WM(J, 
Brotherhood workers, deacons, visitation leaders, etc. Many of us first became aware 
of God's grace through a volunteer who was faithful to God's call. God's call is still 
there, and it is our turn to respond and go. 
* Habitat always moves on the shoulders of our Home Mission Volunteers. This 

can be applied to all phases of the work of the Home Mission Board. Volunteers 
are making it possible for the HMB to do its work. 

What is your excuse for not getting involved? If you have run out if reasons 
for being a spectator and not a participant, Home Missions can change your life, 
become a volunteer for the Home Mission Board. 

Cooperation is the foundation of our Southern Baptist heritage. The coopera- 
tion of WMCI leaders at the church and associational levels has nurtured the Home 
Mission Board into a national agency supporting 3,800 missionaries. 

As president of the Home Mission Board, I commend you for your role in pro- 
moting the Annie Armstrong Easter Offering for Home Missions. Thanks to you, 
we experienced an increase. Because of your cooperation. Southern Baptists heard 
the needs and responded to them. 



16 



STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



In 1989, Southern Baptists gave a record $32,960,700 through the Annie 
Armstrong Easter Offering. This was an increase of almost seven percent over the 
previous year. 

But our receipts still fell $6 million short of our $39 million offering goal. And 
last year was the seventh consecutive year that we did not meet our goal. 

Although the approximate seven percent increase is enabling Home Mis- 
sionaries to tell the Good News to more people, how many more people could we 
reach if we had met our goal? 

OaT OF BGSINESS CHORCHES 

Visualize 6,210 churches. Doors locked and bolted. A sign on the outside of 
each door that reads, "Out of business. No persons to win." 

Foolishness, you say? But is it? Last year, 6,2 1 churches in the Southern Bap- 
tist Convention did not baptize a single person. They might as well have tacked 
a sign on the door that said as much. From their perspective, there must not have 
been anyone left to evangelize. 

What's more disturbing is more than 1,000 of these churches have gone as 
long as four years without baptizing a single person. What kind of churches are they? 

Often they are small, with limited resources. But at least one church of 1 ,000 
members went a full year without baptizing a single person. 

Here's another shocker: Only 210 SBC churches baptize 100 or more persons 
a year. Among churces of 1,000-plus members who are not in the top 210, the 
average number of people baptized annually is 29. 

We will never make Bold Mission Thrust a reality if we do business as many 
of our churches do. if the New Testament is clear about anything, it is that soul- 
winning is the job of the church. Sure, we do missions and ministry. But without 
soul-winning as our priority, we might just as well hang a sign on the door that 
says, "Out of business. No more prospects to win." 

Respectfully submitted, 
Doris Tester 



Roy Gryder spoke to the Biblical Recorder Report. We Americans have the 
freedom to speak out against things. There is no basis for many accusations against 
Editor Puckett and no deliberate misdeeds. Many new General Board members 
of the Recorder have not even come out with any actual accusations. Don't take 
any of these things too seriously. We must be careful of how we accept these ac- 
cusations when we read or hear them concerning our state paper. 



Roy Holder spoke to the State Missions Report. He works in the Church Ex- 
tension division. 10,000 new church sites are needed. One out of every two peo- 
ple you meet throughout the day knows Christ. Many people will not be reached 
by a traditional church. About 65 to 70% of our churches are on a plateau — not 
growing — or declining. Our church planners can help you with taking a look at 



STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



17 



where you are, where you have been and where you are going. Today 1.7 people 
come to church in each care compared to 3.5 a few years ago. Mission support — 
especially State Missions in NC— is essential. Please give generously as we need 
a boost if we are to continue to help our churches to advance the Kingdom of Christ. 

Bill Stillerman spoke to the Retirement Homes Report. Without your support, 
our ministry would not be possible. There are three important things about our 
ministry: 

1 . We believe our foundation is based on the gospel good news of Jesus Christ— 
as healing. We enhance the quality of life for older adults. 

2. We believe in older adults. The majority of the people of hC think that by the 
time you reach 65 and have not met your goals, you might as well give up and 
be put out to pasture. We believe that people over 65 are our greatest resource. 

3. We believe in quality care for our older adults. A restraint and drug therapy-free 
environment. 100% of our residents have out-lived their life expectancy. There 
are things you can do for us, pray for us, make people aware of our needs, and 
support us financially. Every dollar we receive is used to underwrite the care 
for those who cannot afford it. 

Our Special Day Offering will be in February. 1991 and will be called the NC Offer- 
ing for Older Adults. 



Sue Fitzgerald spoke to the Christian Higher Education Report. In Luke 7, John 
sends his disciples to ask Jesus if he is the Messiah. I think Jesus would say to 
us, "as I have done, you also go and do." No matter where we serve, we are called 
to follow Christ's example. As your colleges, we are called to meet the needs of 
our students. They don't know of possibilities, they are blind to their abilities. Some 
are lame to their physical needs and need our program for physical fitness. Some 
are financially poor but we have helps available. Some are spiritually poor and pro- 
grams are available to help them. We also have programs for the learning disabled. 

We can't help everyone, but we want to help those we can. Our Resource Center 
has helps for all needs. Your only cost is to write and mail back any literature you 
borrow and this is the way we want to help you. 

THE BIBLICAL RECORDER 

ASSOCIATIONAL REPORT 1990 

We need your help! 

Never in the History of Southern Baptists has there been a time of more con- 
flict and tension, much of it based on misunderstanding or a lack of correct infor- 
mation. As never before, we need informed Baptists to make the right decisions 
for the Kingdom's work in the name of Christ. 

The most important thing facing us at this point is to get the RECORDER into 
more Baptist homes than ever before. Your support as a subscriber and reader, 
and your encouragement to others will enable the paper to better serve the consti- 
tuency with accurate and helpful information delivered to Baptist homes and 
churches. 



18 



STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



Baptists must have a single source of news and information upon which to 
make decisions and evaluate ministries. The RECORDER is that source; nothing 
else matches the paper as a single source of news, information, inspiration and 
challenge in our mission efforts together. 

In order to save churches, large amounts of money, and to increase reader- 
ship of the RECORDER, Church News Service (CNS) has been launched in 1990. 
This system lets any congregation have their church newsletter incorporated into 
the BIBLICAL RECORDER which saves staff time, postage and printing costs. Usual- 
ly, for less than what it costs to produce the church newsletter, CNS gives the en- 
tire Baptist communication package to each family in the congregation. 

The paper will focus more and more attention on North Carolina Baptists with 
news, features and inspirational articles which will encourage individuals and chur- 
ches in their witness and ministry, where they are, and to the ends of the rapidly 
changing world. 

Never has God given Baptists a greater opportunity; never have there been 
as many difficulties and obstacles to overcome. One sure way to conquer problems 
and overcome the barriers to effective witness and ministry is to have the facts, 
know the issues and be adequately informed. 

That is why the RECORDER was born; that is why it serves today. For more 
information on how your church can subscribe or use CNS, contact: 

THE BIBLICAL RECORDER 

232 West Millbrook Road 

Raleigh, NC 27609 

(919) 847-2127 

Respectfully submitted, 
Lloyd Buckner 

BAPTIST RETIREMENT HOMES OF NORTH CAROLINA 

1990 PROVIDING THE BEST OF TIMES TO N.C. OLDER ADULTS 

Making life for Older Adults the Best of Times is the continuing goal of Bap- 
tist Retirement Homes of North Carolina, Inc., which operates four residential 
facilities for Older Adults around the state — in Albemarle, Asheville, Hamilton, 
and Winston-Salem. 

In Winston-Salem, Brookridge Retirement Community celebrates its first 
birthday in 1990. It is the largest of the facilities, providing five levels of care — 
independent living in garden homes, independent living in apartments, and assisted 
living, intermediate nursing care and skilled nursing in its healthcare unit — to 350 
Older Adults. The residents have developed a strong community spirit. 

Around the state, other homes face a promising year. 

The Board of Trustees of Baptist Retirement Homes applied in July for per- 
mission to construct the 60 nursing care beds the state is allocating to Buncombe 
County in 1990. 

State approval of its plans will be the next step toward adding a 60-bed 
healthcare unit to the Western North Carolina Baptist Home in Asheville, a unit 
offering skilled and intermediate nursing care. Currently the only nursing care pro- 
vided by the Baptist Retirement Homes in the 85-bed nursing care unit at 
Brookridge. The western part of our state has one of the fastest-growing popula- 
tions of Older Adults. 



STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



19 



The facilities in Albemarle and Hamilton provided assisted living in a residential 
setting to 30 Older Adults each. Both programs are greatly enhanced by the strong 
support of the surrounding community and its churches. The Brotherhood, WM(J 
and senior adult clubs at many nearby churches provide fellowship, entertainment, 
skills and physical labor, household needs — whatever they see are needed by each 
home. 

The Albemarle Baptist Home also offers respite care for those families who 
care for an Older Adult and need some time away from that responsibility. The 
cost of the care is paid by the family, and it provides overnight care for whatever 
length of time the family needs. It, and other alternative forms of residential care 
for Older Adults, are additional ways being explored by the Homes to meet the 
growing needs of the Older Adult Baptist population in the state. 

Please pray for our ministry. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Mamie Craig 



CHRISTIAN HIGHER EDUCATION REPORT 

And God breathed into humans the breathe of life, and they became living 
souls. Not a soul without a body, but a person with a spirit that reaches out to God, 
with a body that is good, with a mind to know self, others, God and the world. 
Because a baby cries and is a living being does not mean that baby is a mature 
person. Wholeness comes as we grow. It takes many different things to help us 
grow toward wholeness, toward a maturing Christian. 

One of the goals of your Baptist colleges is to help students grow toward 
wholeness. Each of your seven colleges and universities strives toward this goal. 
A Christian college sees the whole person as important and seeks to help each 
student to grow in relationships: God, others, society and self. The Christian Col- 
lege is not just interested in cramming into a person a bunch of facts, although 
facts are important. It is not just interested in giving a person job skills, although 
skills are important. Your colleges are interested in facts and skills, but only when 
they are put in the larger context of the overall objective of helping persons know 
self in relation to God, to know self in relation to the past, the present and the 
future, to see self in relation to the environment, to feel and taste the beauty of 
life and to understand the interdependence with all God's creatures. 

Your colleges continually evaluate its programs to be sure objectives are be- 
ing met. At present. Mars Hill College is seriously looking at where we are so we 
can determine what kind of school we are capable of becoming. 

A commission, made up of 50 to 75 persons drawn from churches, businesses, 
government, professions, and cultural organizations, have been charged with the 
responsibility of developing recommendations for the future of Mars Hill College. 
Divided into seven committees, or task forces, they will look at the following areas: 
mission and purpose, enrollment management and marketing, resource develop- 
ment, faculty leadership and academic programs, student and community life, 
finances and facilities, and external relations. 

Concerning the importance of the Commission, President Bentley said, "We 
must develop a vision based on the distinctive purpose of Mars Hill College as we 
move into the 21st Century. This consideration should take into account the needs 



20 



STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



of the students as well as the needs of a society. Our role in preparing students 
for leadership and service in the 21st Century will require a rigorous educational 
program, high academic standards, and a serious commitment to Christian ideals 
and moral values." 

The findings and the report of the Commission will be given to the trustees 
in May of 1991. 

Sue Fitzgerald 
Respectfully submitted, 
Edith Gryder 



CENTER FOR CHRISTIAN EDUCATION MINISTRIES 
MARS HILL COLLEGE 

Entrance — South side of cafeteria building 



Sue Fitzgerald, 

Director 

(704) 689-1322 

P.O. Box 594 
Mars Hill, NC 
28754 



Audio-Visuals 



Pastor's 
Study 



Youth 

S.S.* 
Doctrine 

C.T.* 

Children 

Pre-School 



College 
Corner 



Music 



Adult 
Drama 
Recreation 
Bible 



Reception 
Office 



Family 



Commuter 
Lounge 



Museum 



Commuter 
Lounge 



Spirituality 



Leadership 



WMU 



Mission 
Museum 



■ To— 

Cafeteria 



•Sunday School 
Church Training 



Seminary 
Extension 



Equipping 

Church 
& 

Community Senior Adult 
Handicapped 



Missions 



Brotherhood 



Evangelism 



Director's 
Office 



Study 
Area 



STOrSY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



21 



BAPTIST HOSPITAL REPORT 
TO THE ASSOCIATIONS 1990 

"The largest health-science building program ever in Morth Carolina has 
changed the landscape on Hawthorne Hill, and the changes continue in rapid suc- 
cession. ..One thing that hasn't changed is the institution's tradition for delivery 
of compassionate health care. That will never change." This statement, from Dr. 
Charles P. Nicholson, Jr., Baptist Hospital Trustee and Chairman of the Medical 
Center Board of Directors, is both a report and a commitment. 

Another building in this $190 million expansion program has recently been 
completed and occupied. The Clinical Sciences building will house most of the 
Medical Center's ambulatory services, and has been termed a "medical super- 
market, " where patients may do "one-stop shopping." The building will also ac- 
commodate an Ambulatory Surgery Gnit, Medical Center administrative offices, 
and other functions. Nearing completion, is the Day Care Center for children of 
Medical Center employees. Under construction, is an addition to the MRI (Magnetic 
Resonance Imaging) building, and a significant addition to the Patient/Visitor Park- 
ing Deck. Construction on the Center on Aging building is scheduled to begin in 
early 1991 with the completion date set for the spring of 1993. 

The purpose of all these new facilities, according to hospital president, Len 
B. Preslar, Jr., is to "enable us to respond to patient needs better than ever before." 
In addition to continuation and improvement of many established procedures, 
several new diagnostic and treatment programs have been started recently. The 
Organ Transplant Program added a new dimension when it performed the first 
single-lung transplant in North Carolina. Bone marrow transplants are also being 
performed now in our Baptist Hospital. A Cranio-facial Clinic, to correct major 
deformities of the skull and upper face during the first year of life, opened recent- 
ly. New laser technology provides an improved method for clearing out 
atherosclerotic deposits in the carotid arteries of the neck. New surgical techniques 
make possible better treatment of complicated retinal detatchment. Orthopedic 
surgeons began use of the llizarov Technique for the repair and lengthening of 
broken bones. New approaches are being used effectively in the treatment of 
children with Cerebral Palsy. Bowman Gray/Baptist Hospital is the only medical 
center in the nation using and evaluating Clinodean. a non-narcotic pain killer which 
has proven effective in controlling pain following surgery and for cancer patients. 

Through these various services we provided 210,456 days of care for 22,607 
patient admissions last year. In addition to these, there were approximately 388,000 
ambulatory patient visits in the various clinics, the Emergency Department, the 
Day Hospital, and in Ambulatory Surgery. These patients came from all across North 
Carolina and from thirty-four other states. Also the number of patients being referred 
to us from foreign countries is increasing as the reputation of the Medical Center 
spreads throughout the world. 

The Department of Pastoral Care continues to strengthen its reputation both 
as a service agency and as a teaching facility. Last year, the department provided 
more than 29,000 ministries to hospital patients, almost 19,000 services to families, 
and more than 14,000 services for hospital and church staff members and their 
families. The Minister's Care Plan, a joint program with the Baptist State Conven- 
tion, had 1,446 sessions with more than 200 different clergy families last year. 
The new Missionary Counseling and Support Services Program saw 48 individuals 



22 



STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



\ 



in its first six months. The Division of Clinical Pastoral Education/Chaplaincy had 
53 students enrolled. 

During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1990, the hospital received $692,946.24 
through the Cooperative Progranri and $271,361.24 through the Homes and Hospital 
Offering and direct gifts. Cooperative Program funds are used for the Department 
of Pastoral Care, and other church gifts help to provide benevolent care for the 
financially needy patients. The hospital staff and patients are most grateful for this 
continuing financial support. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Linda Church 



Calvin Knight spoke to the Baptist Hospital Report. We have returned to the 
Mother's Day special offering for the Baptist Hopsital. Today, NCBH is a large com- 
plex, with 800 beds and 5,000 employees. It spends 1 million dollars every 30 hours. 
There has been a slight change in the type of care given. We are now primarily 
involved in specialized care not provided by community hospitals. We recently per- 
formed the first single lung transplant in MC. We began bone marrow transplants 
recently and repair of cranial/facial deficits from birth defects. Laser is being used 
to clear out carotid arteries of the neck. We can care for children with cerebral 
palsy. We are the only hospital using and testing the new drug Clinodean, a non- 
narcotic pain killer. 

One thing hasn't changed, we still give compassionate health care and hope — 
this will never change. 

The most important way we show that we care is to try to meet the spiritual 
needs of our patients, whether prayer by the surgeon before surgery, or an engineer 
talking to a small child to cheer him up, or our chaplains who are important to 
this ministry and are available when the patient's own pastor cannot be available. 

We pledge to you that we will continue to minister to the whole body and spirit 
of our patients. 

ANNUAL MESSAGE— SCOTT CHURCH 

John 4:28-30. The Woman did not understand about the living water Jesus 
told her about. She told the town to come see a man and that is what I want us 
to do today, to "come see a man," and that man is Jesus. The one who was there 
when the world was created, conceived of a virgin by the Holy Spirit, a man born 
as a man to redeem men. I believe what the Bible says on this despite the con- 
troversy today. He was totally human but also completely God. We need to say 
to the lost, "come see a man. " A witness is of no use unless it has witnessed. I 
want us to see Jesus as the redeemer today. Jesus' blood can cleanse us from all 
unrighteousness. He led a sinless life although he was human and did his Father's 
will continually. There was a conflict of will between every other person in the Bi- 
ble and God's will, except Jesus, and there is a conflict between our will and God's 
will today. There should be joy in our hearts and we should strive to find God's 
will in our lives. 

What are your motives: God knows our lives. No one knows us like Jesus does. 
He stilled the tempest for the disciples and he will still the tempest in our lives. 
He healed the blind, cast out devils, healed the lame and calls us to Him. Come 



STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATIOM 



23 



see the man who knows all things, and had one purpose in life — death for the 
redemption of mankind. A man who was beaten, spit upon and slapped for us. Every 
human being at some time will bow before Him. He is the man that shed His blood 
for us, died and rose again on the third day, and the man who ascended to the 
Father and intercedes with the Father for us. He knows our heart's desires and our 
intentions. 

He is the man coming again some day for His redeemed. We should look for- 
ward to the day when we will be relieved. He has prepared a place for us. I believe 
my place is ready and one day he will come after me. He sent the Holy Spirit to 
dwell within us. 

He forgives me of my sin, and when I fail to honor Him the way I should. He 
is our redeemer and our comforter. 

Benediction 
Adjourn for Lunch 

FRIDAY AFTERNOOM PROCEEDINGS 
Song — "Nothing But the Blood" 

Devotion— Charles Craig— John 14:6— Being fed Spiritually. Jesus said, "I am the 
door," in chapter 10. In this verse He says, "I am the way, the truth and the light." 

Bill Morrow spoke on the Children's Homes. What is the greatest thing I know? 
Jesus loves me, this I know, for the Bible tells me so. People really care about the 
children across the state of North Carolina. Jesus said that the children are impor- 
tant too when He said, "Let the little children come unto me. " We want to help 
the children reach their greatest potential for life and to provide quality care for 
them. We want them to become all that God wants them to become in Christ Jesus. 

Some parents do not know how to parent. Many do not go to church. Only 
about 2% of the children are orphans. Most are from broken homes. Many parents 
are alcoholics and that is more important to them than the child. 

When a child comes into our care, so do the parents, and must meet with us 
quarterly. We want to help them to be a family, to get the family back together. 
Most are teenagers with an average age of 14, because they are so rebellious at 
that age and many parents cannot cope. The children have not had any respon- 
sibility and nothing to do. 

Jesus uses us as His instrument to reach these children and we appreciate all 
your support. We try to use all funds well to minister to children and their families. 
We promise to be good stewards. 

Remember Thanksgiving Offering to the Children's Homes. 

NORTH CAROLINA BAPTIST 
FOUNDATION REPORT TO 
BAPTIST ASOCIATIONS OF NORTH CAROLINA 

The historical records of the North Carolina Baptist Foundation will reveal 
1989 and 1 990 to be significant in its 70 year history. Organized, following action 



24 STOMY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

taken at the 1919 Convention and chartered by the State of North Carolina in 1920 
as a charitable corporation, the Trustee agency of the Convention has only in re- 
cent years begun to have an impact in providing financial support for Baptist in- 
stitutions and mission causes. 

Charged with the responsibility of creating greater awareness among Baptists 
within North Carolina concerning estate stewardship as a viable and significant 
means of providing financial support of Christian endeavors fostered by our chur- 
ches, the Baptist Foundation assists individuals in the establishment of endow- 
ment and trust funds. Through these funds, financial support is provided for the 
donor's chosen Christian cause or causes on a continuing basis for years to come, 
long after the donor's death. 

The growth of the Foundation, in terms of assets managed, has been signifi- 
cant during the past few years. Since January 1, 1988, the assets placed under 
management of the Foundation has increased by over $ 13 million through May, 
1990. This exceeds the asset growth goals set in 1986 for a five year period. 

Trust income distributed to Baptist 
institutions and mission causes 

1988 and 1989 $1,106,930 

Trust income distributed to individuals 
with Baptist causes named as charitable 

remainderman during 1988 and 1989 $1,361,836 

Assets held in trust and endowment funds 

as of June 1, 1990 (unaudited) $26,167,481 

Assets held in trust and endowment funds 

as of December 31, 1989 (audited) $18,133,634 

Gifts of appreciated assets, such as stock and real estate, can be placed in 
trust to generate income for individuals and then pay income to Christian causes 
beyond their lifetime. As a result of this unique opportunity to give, older adults 
are realizing the joy of establishing life income trusts. This plan often provides 
a significant increase in personal income, by-pass of capital gain taxes, creation 
of a charitable deduction for income tax and estate taxes, and assures an eventual 
gift to Christian endeavors. 

A new home for the Baptist Foundation was built during 1989 and early 1990. 
The 6,000 square foot office building was constructed from gifts from individuals 
and is located on property provided by the Baptist State Convention next to the 
Baptist Building in Cary. The new facility was occupied in February, 1990, and 
provides much needed space for the work of staff as well as for conferences and 
meetings. Baptist groups are invited to use the meeting rooms when in the 
Raleigh/Cary area. We extend an invitation to church groups to call and arrange 
a visit to the newest building used for the Lord's service by North Carolina Baptists. 

The Foundation employs seven full time employees and operates under the 
direction of a 20-member Board of Directors elected by the Baptist State 
Convention. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Edwin S. Coates 
Executive Director 



Dale Luttrell 



STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



25 



Lloyd Culler spoke to the Baptist Foundation Report. Interest on accounts is 
used to support all the Christian endeavors of the SBC. Trust funds can be set up 
on the name of anyone you wish to have honored. The funds will be sent to whichever 
organization you choose. 

We must use faithfully what God has given us and some day we will become 
accountable for it. None of us are wealthy, but we need to find a way to support 
the work until Jesus returns. We are stewards and must give an account of what 
we are entrusted with. 

Just contact the Baptist Foundation in Cary and they will do the rest and it 
doesn't cost you anything. 

I Corinthians 4:2 — those given a trust must prove faithful. 

TREASURER REPORT 

INTAKE 8/1/89 - 7/31/90 



Other $1,090.00 

Boone Fork 690.00 

Doe Ridge 315.00 

Laytown 315.00 

Mt. Ephriam 600.00 

Rock Spring 1,026.00 

Sandy Flat 2,414.00 



Total , $6,450.00 

Minutes (paid) 245.00 

Monthly 537.50 

PAID OGT 

Director of Missions Salary $2,667.50 

Travel 377.00 

Annuity 624.00 

Taxes 752.00 



Total $4,420.50 

OTHER EXPENDITURES 

VBS (Literature) $ 126.95 

P.O. Box/Postage 65.00 

New Checks 10.00 

Clerk Salary 250.00 

Treasurer Salary 250.00 

Minutes 493.00 



Total $1,194.95 

Paid back to Baptist State Convention $416.16 

Total in Account at Present $1,523.00 



26 STOMY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



STONY FORK ASSOCIATION 
PROPOSED BUDGET 1990-1991 

Based on an average income of $540.00 (per month) or .... (yrly.) $6,480.00 

Director of Missions Travel Expenses (yrly.) 3,000,00 

Director of Missions Annuity (per month) $52.00 (yrly.) 624.00 

Clerical and Miscellaneous 50.00 

Clerk 250.00 

Treasurer 250.00 

Vacation Bible School 150.00 

Phone (for better communication in the Assoc.) 100.00 

Sunday School 100.00 

Discipleship Training 100.00 

Evangelism . . . 100.00 

Total $1L^.^_ 

Will eliminate Post Office Box as treasurer and clerk prefer to receive mail at home. 



VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL 

Our associational VBC Clinic was held at Sandy Flat Baptist Church on May 
20 with 43 in attendance representing 7 of our churches. 

Our theme was, "Share Hope, Reach for Vacation Bible School." The reports 
that I have received from 6 of our churches show that each church had 5 or 6 ses- 
sions of VBS lasting an average of 2 hours each. 

Out of the churches reporting, a total of 37 children attended VBS this year 
that are not enrolled in any Sunday School. 

Six of our associational VBS workers went to the State Clinic at Wilkesboro 
on March 9th, including; 

Edith Gryder— Adults 
Mary Greene — Younger Children 
Donna Triplett — Older Pre-School 
Norma Crowder — Middle Pre-School 
Barbara West— VBS Director 
Sandra Church — Middle Children 

If you need our help in arranging a VBS in your church next year, please let 
us know. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Barbara West, Assoc. VBS Director 



FOREIGN MISIONS REPORT 



The Foreign Mission Board has more than 3,750 missionaries assigned to more 
than 1 20 countries. 

New work has opened up in the Soviet Union and Czechoslovakia. There are 



STOMY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



27 



now ten missionaries assigned to the Eastern Europe ministries. Two more have 
recently joined the force and the Missions Board is seeking eighty-eight more. 

Also, in Czechoslovakia, Baptists are eager to construct new buildings or 
renovate old ones in a dozen or more locations. They are dusting off church con- 
struction plans that are twenty years old. Leaders say they are finally free to put 
up buildings without fear of communist reprisal. 

Another word about Czechoslovakia, about 1,000 people (a tenth of the au- 
dience) expressed interest in accepting Christ as Saviour during a May evangelistic 
crusade in Prague, led by former American astronaut James Irwin and British Baptist 
evangelist Vic Jackopson. 

More good news of Foreign Missions, more than 1,880 people — a record 
number — committed themselves to Foreign Missions support or participation during 
the Foreign Mission Board Report to the Southern Baptist Convention in Mew 
Orleans. 

There can't be all good news, so here is a little bad news about the Lottie Moon 
Christmas Offering. By the time the financial books closed in May, Southern Bap- 
tists had spent $80,197,870.78 for the 1989 Lottie Moon Christmas Offering for 
Foreign Missions. The total for the offering, which provides close to half of the 
Foreign Mission Board's budget, represented a 1.79 percent increase over 1988 
receipt. 

It was the highest total ever for the annual offering, generally given in local 
churches during December. 

Still, the total fell short of the 81 million dollar goal, amounting to about 99 
percent of the goal. The increase in 1989 also failed to keep pace with the four 
percent to five percent inflation rate in the U.S. and even higher inflation rates 
in many countries where Southern Baptist Missionaries work. 

To reach the 1990 offering goal of $86 million. Southern Baptists will need 
to increase giving by about 7.2 percent. 

In June, the Southern Baptist Woman's Missionary Union Executive Board set 
the 1991 Lottie Moon goal at $88 million. 

Foreign Mission Board trustees meeting in June voted to take about $800,000 
from current cash on hand to make up for the shortfall in the 1989 Lottie Moon 
Christmas Offering. "The full $81 million goal had been budgeted," said Carl 
Johnson, Vice-President for Finance. Transfer of the funds will enable the Board 
to fund all overseas capital projects budgeted. WE NEED TO GET ON WITH THE 
PROGRAM PEOPLE. (TIME) IS RUNNING OUT FOR THIS WORLD. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Scott Church 



SUNDAY SCHOOL REPORT 

We did not reach our Challenge 10/9 goal of enrolling ten thousand in the 
Southern Baptist Convention, but we did reach some unenrolled people. At the 
end of 1990, there were 35,354 churches in North Carolina and 3,459 of these 
churches have Sunday School on Sunday morning. Increasing Sunday School enroll- 
ment is an effort to encourage people, "God's people," to reach others for Jesus 
Christ. Should the lost people have to seek us out? It is the duty and privilege of 
God's people to go and seek others for Jesus Christ. 



28 



STOMY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATIOM 



\ 



That was the main reason for the "Final Four" we held at Rock Spring on May 
6, 1990. This rally was to increase our Sunday School attendance. 

In October, 1990, we will begin a new program in Sunday School entitled, 
"Break Through: Reach to Win." I hope we will all work together to promote this 
and work toward an increase in Sunday School enrollment for the remainder of 
1990 and 1991. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Sandra Church 

2:35 Adjournment 

1990 ANNUAL REPORT 
CHRISTIAN ACTION LEAGOE 
OF NORTH CAROLINA, INC. 

LEGISLATIVE ISSUES 

1. GAMBLIMG 

As this report is being prepared, the battle is still on concerning a state-wide 
lottery. The gambling industry is well-staffed with its personnel and lobbyists who 
relentlessly pursue their interests among the members of the General Assembly. 
Legislators are constantly barraged by one of them to "let the people vote" to put 
the state into the gambling business. 

2. DRUNK DRIVING 

Proposals from Governor Jim Martin and even a Legislative Study Commit- 
tee that would really toughen our drunk driving laws seem to be tied up in a House- 
Senate Conference Committee. Some well-known Senate Defense attorneys are 
determined to keep anything of real substance from passing. 

The pending legislation calls for: 

a. The lowering of the breathalyzer blood alcohol level from .10 to .08; 

b. The banning of open containers of all alcoholic beverages in motor vehicles; 

c. Increasing the civil revocation of drivers' licenses from 10 to 30 days; (North 
Carolina is the only state in the nation with less than a 30-day loss of driving 
privileges for registering a .10 or above on the breathalyzer.) 

d. Increasing the fines for being convicted of drunk driving; (In 1947 the minimum 
fine was $100, and it is still the same 43 years later.) 

3. ABORTION 

a. Because of the outstanding work of Representative "Skip" Stam of Wake Coun- 
ty, the House voted to reduce the state's abortion fund from $400,000 to 
$100,000. These remaining funds could not be used for abortion as a means 
of birth control. They could only be utilized for abortion when the mother's life 
in endangered, or in cases that result from rape or incest. However, the Senate 
voted to leave the funding at its current rate, so the measure is now tied up in 
a conference committee. 



STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



29 



b. A parental consent proposal overwhelmingly passed the House requiring a 
parent's approval before an abortion could be performed on a minor. (Such con- 
sent is required before a school official can give an aspirin to a student, but such 
consent is not required for a minor to receive an abortion.) But it appears that 
the Senate will not approve this measure. 

4. MISCELLANEOUS 

Other legislative proposals such as raising the tax on alcoholic beverages, re- 
quiring the teaching in public schools of sexual abstinence outside of marriage 
to combat the teenage pregnancy problem, and making the possession of child 
pornography a felony were considered but were side-tracked by the Senate. Inciden- 
tally, the tax on beer has not been increased in North Carolina since 1969. This 
reveals how strong the beer lobbyists are. 

CHGRCH AND COMMUNITY ASSISTANCE 

In the past year, the League has successfully assisted in alcoholic beverage 
campaigns in places such as Hertford County, Pamlico County, Concord, Lumber- 
ton, Manteo, Randleman, Waynesville. etc. in their efforts to defeat various referenda 
such as liquor-by-the-drink and beer/wine sales. 

We have sought to keep the Christian community informed on moral and 
ethical issues through our publication Tomorrow, and through speaking in chur- 
ches, pastor's conferences, and civic clubs. 

Thank you for your prayer and financial support in our ministry of applied 
Christianity. 

Coy C. Privette 
Executive Director 

Joe S. Lennon 
President 

Respectfully submitted, 
Charles Smith 



PROCEEDINGS SATURDAY MORNING — AUGUST 11, 1990 
SANDY FLAT BAPTIST CHURCH 

The moderator, George Berry called the Stony Fork Association to order for 
the second day of the annual meeting at 9 o'clock. 

Song: "Trust and Obey " — Charles Smith 

Devotion— Max West— John 3:16 — The most important thing in the world today 
is a human being. 



30 STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



Roll Call 

Bailey Camp 4 

Boone Fork 6 

Doe Ridge 3 

Laytown 4 

Long Ridge 2 

Mt. Ephriam 

Rock Spring 4 

Sandy Flat 4 

Other 1 

Total 28 



TEMPERANCE AND MORALS REPORT 

Speaker Lt. Hank Lane from Lenoir 

There are two ways of life today, ours and the violent side, the side that has 
strayed, seeking gold, silver, oil, etc. Society tends to not want to get involved, 
pass no judgements. Many people have no parenting skills. Parents are abdicating 
the training and care of their children to others, school, church, law, etc. 

Children face things we never even thought about. Movies and T.V. show drugs 
as being cute and funny but they are not funny, they are deadly. Drug dealers are 
often shown as sleazy, when in reality they are usually a kid's best friend. i 

Some kids are beginning to take responsibility in their classrooms and we are 
beginning to see a slight turnaround in children. 

Most criminals have come from dysfunctional homes and have suffered 
physical, emotional and even sexual abuses. So much domestic violence today goes ^ 
back to abuse of a decade ago. Children don't know who they are, no identity ■ 
because they may have several sets of parents and step-parents. We must give them 
the strength to say no and teach them responsibility for their actions. We are all 
put on this earth for a reason, to help one another. 



STATE MISSIONS 

North Carolina is a mission field. We may think all mission fields are in foreign 
countries but our own state has so many needs for mission work. 

Our North Carolina State Missions offering goes to support Christain educa- 
tion, Fruitland Baptist Institute — which has helped and continues to help so many 
of our pastors — N.C Baptist Men, Caswell Capital Funds, and the Christian Action 
League. This offering also helps start new churches, such as churches for the deaf 
and other special groups. I know of one such church built in Hickory for the deaf 
and I know the pastor, Mr. Jess Bowman, as I have a deaf niece who goes to the 
church and it means a lot to her to have a place where she can worship. 

So many of our churches are small and can only give a little but added together 
it goes further to support our State Missions. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Rosetta Hollifield 



STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



31 



STEWARDSHIP REPORT 

How are we doing? In the two days that we gather for the annual meeting, we 
have heard from many of our Baptist agencies across the state. Some of the reports 
were encouraging and we nodded and looked proud and said, "amen." Other reports 
were less encouraging and we sat quietly and looked a little blank and worried. 
But how are we here in the hills doing? If we look at our work with a critical eye, 
how does it look? 

The answer — not too bad. I have kept records for the past four years on the 
amounts our churches have received from our members and what percentage of 
that income has gone to mission work. For that period, about '/3 of the income 
of the churches has gone to mission work outside the churches. As an associa- 
tion, we have not forgotten to reach out with helping hands, healing hands, and 
the good news about Jesus. 

In the last few months, we have seen our churches responding generously and 
graciously to a request for funds for the Brazil Partnership and I can report that 
after the current mission trip by Rev. Scott Church, that it appears that there will 
still be funds remaining to apply to the next endeavor. My thanks to each of you 
and your individual church members for your efforts. 

The less cheerful side of this picture is that the amount given to the churches 
over the last four years has remained constant or dropped off slightly. Ask yourself 
what has been the possible cause of this. In considering how I think and how human 
nature is, I have reached this conclusion, that most people gii^e to fill the need. When 
our members feel that the need has been filled, they are less concerned with their 
giving. 

If 1 am correct in this evaluation of our members, the burden is then placed 
square on the shoulders of those of us here today to carry away from this meeting, 
a message to our people. We need to make them know that as long as there Is 
a hungry child, an uncared for old person, a broken home, or especially a man, 
woman, boy or girl who has not been told about Jesus, then the work is not finish- 
ed and the need remains. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Roy Qryder 



DISCIPLESHIP TRAINING 

Church training has had a name change. Our new name is Discipleship Train- 
ing. In the Southern Baptist Convention, we saw a 1.6% increase in the year of 
1989. Our enrollment is 2,026,000. Discipleship Training in North Carolina saw 
a slight increase as well. 

Long Ridge Church, in our association, began a Discipleship Training Program 
this year. Rock Spring Church did some short-term training sessions. We have three 
churches with on-going training programs. 

"M" Night was held at Boone Fork Church with 6 churches represented. Our 
speaker was Maurice Cooper, the Director of Discipleship Training Department 
of the Baptist State Convention. 

The Associational Church Training Team attended a training session at 
Ridgecrest in November. I would like to encourage each church with Discipleship 



32 



STOMY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



Training to continue with their programs, and to those churches with no training 
program, I would encourage you to consider starting one. 

If you have a short-term training session in your church, be sure to report this 
on the church letter. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Charles Craig 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION REPORT 

Matthew 25:40 — "And the King shall answer and say unto them, verily I say 
unto you, inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren, 
ye have done it unto me." 

The WMU goal for last year was to reach, teach and touch people for Christ. 
I think that our ladies did a good job in telling our people what missionaries are 
doing and what Missions is all about. They all took part in sending money to the 
Home and Foreign Missions as well as State Missions. 

We had a prayer retreat in Blowing Rock. There were ladies from all five of 
our WMG's in attendance plus several ladies from Three Forks Association. We 
have been able to see prayers answered from this retreat. 

We had a full team to attend a leadership workshop at Fruitland last year. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Eunice Luttrell 



ANNUAL MESSAGE 

Max West 

ADJUSTING OUR AIM— 

1 . What is our target anyway? Matthew 28:16-20. Jesus gives us the commission 
to go into all the world and teach them. We are missing the target in carrying 
the gospel of Jesus Christ as in Acts 1:8. 

2. Whose responsibility is it to carry the gospel of Jesus Christ? Some think It is 
the pastor's responsibility but it is yours and mine as a Christian. We are all 
to be evangelists. Luke 19:13 — Jesus said, "occupy until I come again." 

3. What is causing us to miss the target if we are? Hebrews 12:1 -3 — What is in our 
lives that is causing us to miss the mission of our lives? Let us lay aside the 
sin that is besetting us. There may be other weights holding us down that need 
to be layed down so we can run the race we are in. Other things that cause us 
to miss the target — we know to do good, and what to do, but don't do it. We 
live in a society of pleasures, and these should not become our goals. Personal 
goals can become weights to hinder us. Fear of rejection is another weight but 
God called us to plant the seed. We lack commitment to be the Christians we 
should be. We are more committed to our jobs, clubs and social activities. 
Another hinderance could be called church-going and church meetings, caus- 
ing us to lose sight of our target. If the training we receive doesn't go any fur- 
ther than to us, why get the training? Why study the word of God if that is the 
end of it We say prayers when we ought to pray prayers. 



STOMY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



33 



4. Why do we need to hit the target to fulfill our mission as Christians? Look unto 
Jesus the author and finisher of our life. He should be an example. We have 
taken our eyes off the goal that God has called us to do. We are in the finishing 
hours of the age when Jesus comes to get His church. To hit the target, we need 
to get our eyes back on Jesus, get rid of the things in our lives and churches 
that cause us to be bogged down with church-going things. Jesus is our exam- 
ple on how to love one another, our neighbors and those that are in the ditches, 
the worst sinner we can imagine. Jesus set us an example of endurance, giving 
his life for our sins, enduring the pain and suffering. 

Every one of us wants to be able to say we have fought the good fight and 
have done our best when we meet Jesus. Jesus said, "occupy until I come." 

DIRECTOR OF MISSIONS REPORT 

Burl Jones 

I appreciate the privilege to serve you and the work I do. It is my desire to be 
faithful in serving you. I need your prayers. I feel better because we decided to 
stop the funds from the SBC. Sometimes we are hindered from doing our best 
because of things that have happened in the past. We have to keep on working 
together and encouraging one another. We need one another, the whole team. 

GENERAL BOARD REPORT 

Roy Gryder 

Most activities have been housekeeping. No major problems or controversy have 
come before the Board. The new Visitors Center at Caswell was dedicated last fall. 



OBITUARIES 



Boone Fork 
Doe Ridge . 
Sandy Flat . 



RESOLUTIONS 



Mrs. Esther Viena Pitts 
. Mrs. Grace Williams 
Mrs. Lavaughn Moody 



Respectfully submitted, 
Linda Mills, Clerk 



Let it be resolved that the Stony Fork Association expresses its thanks and 
appreciation to Rock Spring and Sandy Flat Baptist Churches for their hospitality 
and delicious food. 

We also appreciate the wonderful Christain fellowship and the excellent 
speakers and reports we have heard. Also, we recognize Mr. and Mrs. Scott Church 
for their sacrifices for Scott to go to Brazil on the Mission trip. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Betty Woods 



34 STOMY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATIOM 



EXECOTIVE REPORT 

Election of Officers See beginning of minutes 

for officers and presenters of reports 

Old Business None 

Mew Business None 



Adjournment 
Benediction 



STOMY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATIOM 



35 



STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

Mifitnru mh MtBtnncal Sable 



36 



STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



HISTORY AND HISTORICAL TABLE 



Year Churches 


Moderator 


Clerk 


Pre acher 


1862 Zions Gaic Meeting 








House , Wilkes Co. 


Laikin Hodges 


Larkin Pipes 


Elder Laikin Hodge 


1863 Yellow Hill 


Larkin Hodges 


Larkin Pipes 


Wilson Bradshaw 


1864 Minutes were not prinu-d, manuscript got lost. 






1 865 M t E phf iam 




) , f\ . nou gt s 


Joseph Harrison 


1866 South Kork 


Larkln Hodges 


Eli|ah Trivelt 


Larkin Hodges 


1867 Watauga 


Larkin Hodges 


)ames Parsons 


1 O /~ 1 rl Inn 

J . Is. cariion 


1 868 Union 


Larkin Hodges 


) ames Parsons 


) ames Parsons 


I 869 Stony h ork 


Larkin Hodges 


lames Parso ns 


U/ l-t P h i n 1 rs c 

w. rt. rniinps 


1870 Old field 


1 L ■ U 


) ames Parsons 


wiiiiarn wiicox 


1871 Elk 


Larkin Hodges 


I ames Parsons 


James Parsons 


1872 Ml Ve rnon 




James Parsons 


1 O (~ 1 rl Inn 

) . i\ . \_a r 1 ion 


1873 Watauga 


Urt'n Hodges 


James Parsons 


Larkin Hodges 


1874 V ello w Hill 


Larkin Hodges 


!»! ir^ c ^ 




1875 Laurel Fork 


Ljrkin Hodges 


William E. Greene 


1 ..1,1 \A/ 1 1 c n n 

L t VI Wilson 


1876 S tony Fork 


Ljrkin Hod es 


William E. Greene 


Larkin Hodges 


1877 Poplar Grove 


Lirk'n Hod^'^' 


Elijah Tfivett 


J ames Parsons 


1 878 Old Field 


Larkin Hod^'-s 


William E. Greene 


J , R. Carlton 


1879 Elk 


Larkin Hodges 


William t. Greene 


Monroe Gragg 


1 880 M t Vernon 


Larkin Hodges 


William E. Greene 


Monroe Gragg 


I oo 1 w a [ au^a 


Latkin Hodges 


E 1 i j ah TrI vc 1 1 


Levi W i Ison 


1882 Me Ephriam 


! F Filer 


John R. Hodges 


James Parsons 


1 883 V 1 'ow Hill 




El ijah Trivet I 


Larkin Hodges 


1884 Boones Fork 


Larkin Hod es 


Thomas Pipes 


Larkin Pipes 


1885 Buffalo Cove 


J Eller* 


T hom as Pi pes 


J. F, Eller 


ISRfi Qrnrn; Fnrtr 

1 ooo ;>ioiiy rorK 


L. M. Gragg 


W m . M . Lee 


E. M. Gragg 


1887 Union 


E . M . Gragg 


\AJ m M las 

w m . ivi , Lee 


David Eller 


looo Ldurei rorK 


1 aiTies Parsons 


W m . M , Lee 


W m , M . Lee 


1889 Poplar Grove 


F . M . Gragg 


y/Jm M 1 

w m , ivi . uee 


1 nh n F P 1 ler 

jonn r , Liier 


IRQn Mr Vpf-nnn 
loyu ivi I . vciiiuii 


E . M . G ragg 


W m . M. Lee 


E. M. Gragg 


1 oy 1 waiauga 


E. M, Gragg 


Wm . M , Lee 


). L.. iMiiier 


1 RQ 7 Mr Par in 

\ oy z ivi L . r ar an 


E. M - Gragg 


W m . M . Lee 


E. M. Gragg 


1893 Booncs Fork 


E. M. Gragg 


W m . M . Lee 


3 . 1 . Larroii 


1 894 Yellow Hill 


E M. Gragg 


W m . M . Lee 


1 nh n C F 1 In r 

J on n r , L i le r 


1 895 New River 


E . M . Gragg 


w m . IVI . Lee 


Geo. W . Tr ive tt 


1896 Elk 


E . M . G ragg 


W m . M . Lee 


j . L.. miller 


1 897 Laurel Fork 


E. M . Gragg 


W m . M . Lee 


Wm . M. Lee 


1898 Buffalo Cove 


) C Miller 


W m . M . Lee 


! r i^cu 


1899 Mt Vernon 


E . M . Gragg 


t\ . n . r ipes 


|. J. 1. Sherwood 


1900 Watauga 


EM. G ragg 




n C U 1 rm an 


1901 Stony Fork 


I r M i 1 1 i» r 

1 . . IVI 1 1 ler 


Wm M Lee 


J oh n Crisp 


1902 Poplar Grove 


J C Miller 


H . 1 . jll U 11 


} . L. ■ D lay tuc K 


1903 Boones Fork 


F . M . G f agg 


Wm . M . Lee 


1 r M i 1 lf» r 

J . i_. IVI 1 1 ic r 


1 904 Mt Ephriam 


F . M . Gragg 


W m . M . Lee 


F. M. Gragg 


1 905 Mt Paran 


E . M . Gragg 




W m . M , Lec 


1906 Yellow Hill 


Thos L Day 


W m . M . Lee 


Asa Brown 


1 907 New River 


1 rius . L . Udy 


11/ m M 1 Ae 

w m . ivj . LCc 




1 908 M iddle Cane 




W m . M . Lee 


1 f~ Miller 

1 . L . IVI 1 1 le r 


1909 Elk 


Thos. L. Day 


W m . M , Lee 


1 (~ Miller 

J . u. IVI 1 1 ler 


1910 Laurel Fork 


Thos. L, Day 


w m . ivt . Lee 


W m , M . Lee 


1911 Mt. Vernon 


Thos. L. Day 


W m . M . Lee 


u ■ IVI . w neeicr 


1912 Poplar Grove 


Thos. L. Day 


W m . M . Lee 


K . r . W MC ox 


1913 Watauga 


Thos. L. Day 


N. S- Hampton 


N. S. Hampton 


1914 Ml. Ephriam 


Thos. L. Day 


Wm. M. Lee 




1915 Boones Fork 


Thos. L. Day 


Wm. M. Lee 


D. M. Wheeler 


1916 Rock Springs 


B F. Wilcox 


Wm, M. Lee 


Wm. M. Lee 


1917 Mt. Paran 


B. 1 . Wilcox 


N . 5- Hampton 


N, S. Hampton 


1918 Due to the outbreak of i 


lluen/a no Association was held. 






1919 Yellow Hill 


8. F. Wilcox 


N, S- Hampton 


B. F. Wilcox 


1920 Mt. Vernon 


B. F. Wilcox 


N, S. Hampton 


N. S. Hampton 


1921 Laurel Fork 


6. F. Wilcox 


N. S. Hampton 


D. M. Wheeler 


1922 Watauga 


B. F. Wilcox 


N. S. Hampton 


Oscar Dellinger 


1923 Poplar Grove 


B, F. Wilcox 


N. S. Hampton 


N. S. Hampton 


1924 Boones Fork 


8. F. Wilcox 


j . Amos Hampton 


W. D. Ashley 


1925 Mt. Ephriam 


B, I- , Wilcox 


j. Amos Hampton 


J. A. Hampton 


1926 Rock View 


D. M. Wheeler 


1 . Amos Hampton 


G. M. Watson 



STOhY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATIOM 37 



1927 


Elk 


D. M. Wheeler 


R. F . Wilcox 


A. C. Hamby 


1928 




D- M. Wheeler 


6. F. Wilcox 


B F. Wilcox 


1 929 


S^ndy Flat 


D- M. Wheeler 


B. F. Wilcox 


G. M. Watson 


1930 


Middle Cane 


W. D. Ashley 


B. F. Wilcox 


Linney Barnes 


1931 


L au re 1 F or k 


W, . Ashley 


B. F. Wilcox 


B. F. Wilcox 


1932 


New Hopewell 


G. M. Watson 


B. F. Wilcox 


) . T . McG uire 


1933 


Yellow Hill 


8. F. Wilcox 


Roy Keller 


G. M. Waison 


1934 


Mt. Vernon 


G. W. Gragg 


Roy Keller 


R. H. Shore 


1935 


G r3nd rnothe r Gdp 


G. W. Gragg 


Roy Keller 


W. |. Cook 


1936 


Ml. Ephnam 


G. W. Gragg 


Roy Keller 


Carl Triplett 


1937 


Ml. View 


B. F, Wilcox 


G. M . Watson 


Raymond Hendrix 


1938 


Watauga 


Carl Triplett 


F . L Ham pion 


W D. Aihley 


1939 


Laurel Fork 


Carl Triplet! 


F. L. Hampton 


W. 1 . Cook 


1940 


Bailey Camp 


Carl Tripleil 


F, L. Hampton 


G. M. Watson 


1941 


Sandy Flat 


Lee 1 . Church 


N. L. Harrison 


Roy Keller 


1942 


New Hopcwelt 


Lee 1 . Church 


N. L. Harrison 


B. F. Wilcox 


1943 


Booncs Fork 


Lee 1 . Church 


N. L, Harrison 


W. B. Bryant 


1944 


Watauga 


N. L. Harrison 


W. M. Brown 


Frank Knight 


1945 


Lay town 


N, L. Harrison 


W. M. Brown 


W. D. Ashley 


1946 


Mt. Vernon 


G. M. Watson 


W. M. Brown 


W. D. Ashley 


1947 


Yellow Hili 


Theo Hendrix 


G. M. Watson 


Roscoc Greene 


1948 


No Minutes, Manuscript lost at printers- Held v 


vith Doe Ridge Church. 




1949 


Mt. Paran 


Theo Hendrix 


G. M. Watson 


Roscoe Greene 


1950 


Rock Springs 


Theo Hendrix 


N. L. Harrison 


R. L. Barnes 


1951 


New Hopewell 


Theo Hendrix 


N . L. Harrison 


Barney Oliver 


195 2 


Boones Fork 


G, M. Watson 


1 . Merrill Coltey 


W. |, Cook 


1953 


East Flats 


Theo Hendrix 


G, M . Watson 


R- L. Barnes 


1954 


Mt. Ephriam 


Theo Hendrix 


G. M, Watson 


Lloyd ), Ouller 


1955 


Bailey Camp 


Theo Hendrix 


G. M . Watson 


W, 1 , Cook 


1956 


Laurel Fork 


Theo Hendrix 


) . Merritt Coffey 


W, M, Brown 


1957 


Mt. Vernon and 










Sandy Flat 


Theo Hendrix 


). Merritt Cotfey 


W- 1 , Cook 


1958 


Laytown and 










Rock Springs 


Theo Hendrix 


) . Merritt Col tey 


Carson Eggers 


1959 


New Hopewell and 










Long Ridge 


Carson Eggers 


) . Merritt Cotfc\ 


W. ). Cook 


1960 


Mt, Paran and 










Boones Fork 


Carson Eggers 


). Merntt Cottcy 


Wendell C r iicher 


1961 


Watauga and 










Yellow Hill 


Carson Eggers 


1 , Merrill Cotlcy 


Dupree Gowan 


1962 


Mt. Ephnam and 










Sandy f- lat 


Carson Eggers 


Miss Winilred Hampton 


Rubv McNeil 


1963 


Doe Ridge and 










Rock Springs 


Carson Eggers 


Miss Winifred Hampton 


W, M, Brown 


1964 


Bailey 's Camp 


E. 0. Bustle 


Mrs. Clark Stone 


Wm, Qumn 




Boones Fork 


E. 0, Bustle 


Mrs. Clark Stone 




1965 


Laurel Fork 


E. 0- Bustle 


Mrs. Clark Stone 


W. M. Brown 




Laytown 


E. 0. Bustle 


Mrs, Clark Siorie 




1966 


Longridge 


Archie CIdwson 


Mrs. Clark Sioric 


Phillip Martin 




Mt. Paran 


A C. Moody 


Mrs. Clark Stone 


Lyle (Pete) Vannc 


1967 


Mt. Vernon 


Archie Clawson 


Mrs. Clark Storie 


Basil Tester 




New Hopewell 


Archie Clawson 


Mrs, Clark Storie 


E. 0, Bustle 


1968 


Rock springs 


A C. Moody 


Mrs. Clark Storie 


A C, Moodv 




Sandy Flat 


Archie Clawson 


Mrs. Clark Storie 


Rayner Maiheson 


1969 


Baileys Camp 


Lewis Hodge 


Mrs. Clark Stone 


Lewis Hodge 




Boones Fork 


Lewis Hodge 


Mrs. Clark Storie 


Herring Crisp 


1970 


Laurel Fork 


Lewis Hodges 


Mrs. Max West 


David Austin 




Doe Ridge 


Lewis Hodges 


Mrs. Max West 


Archie Clawson 


1971 


Laytown 


Daviu Austin 


Mrs. Max West 


Raymond Turbyf 




Longridge 


David Austin 


Mrs. Max West 


Shernil Welborn 


1972 


Mt, Ephnam 


David Austin 


Mrs. Max West 


Gurney Robbins 




Mount Paran 


David Austin 


Mrs. Max West 


A, C. Moody 


1973 


Mt. Vernon 


Marvin Saunders 


Mrs. Max West 


Everelte Watson 




New 1 lopewell 


Marvin Saunders 


Mrs. Max West 


Shernil Welborn 


1974 


Rock Springs 


Marvin Saunders 


Mrs. Max West 


Merle |ohnson 




Sandy Flat 


Marvin Saunders 


Mrs, Max West 


Dale Milsiead 


1975 


Vellow Hill 


Merle | ohnson 


Mrs. Max West 


Dean Hodges 




Bailey's Camp 


Merle Johnson 


Mrs. Max West 


Max West 


1976 


Boones Fork 


Charles Craig 


Barbara West 


A. C. Moody 




Doe Ridge 






Lloyd Hoilman 


1977 


Laurel Fork 


Charles Craig 


Barbara West 


Raymond Hendri> 




Laytown 


Charles Craig 


Barbara West 


Max West 



3& STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



1978 Long Ridge 


Ctiarles Craig 


Barbara West 


Philip Martin 


Mount Ephriam 


Ctiarles Craig 


Barbara West 


A C Moody 


1979 Mount Vernon 


Max West 


Barbara West 


Harold Bean 


1979 Boone Fork 


Max West 


Barbara West 


Harold Danner 


1980 Mount Paron 


Max West 


Barbara West 


Jim Lambert 


1980 New Hopewell 


Max West 


Barbara West 


Burl Jones 


1981 Rock Spring 


Max West 


Barbara West 


Cannon Ward 


1981 Sandy Flat 


Max West 


Barbara West 


Jim Lambert 


1982 Watauga 


Max West 


Barbara West 


Jack White 


1982 Bailey Camp 


Max West 


Barbara West 


Cecil Gragg 


1983 Boone Fork 


Jack White 


Barbara West 


Burl Jones 


1983 Doe Ridge 


Jack White 


Barbara West 


J R Robbins 


1984 Laurel Fork 


Jack White 


Linda Mills 


Jack White 


Laytown 


Jack White 


Linda Mills 


Ed Greene 


1985 Long Ridge 


J R Robbins 


Linda Mills 


Scott Church 


Mount Ephriam 


J R Robbins 


Linda Mills 


Ed Greene 


1986 Rock Spring 


J R Robbins 


Linda Mills 


Scott Church 


Sandy Flat 


J R Robbins 


Linda Mills 


Max West 


1987 Bailey Camp 


J-R Robbins 


Linda Mills 


Greg Mathls 


1987 Boone Fork 


J R- Robbins 


Linda Mills 


Everett Little 


1988 Doe Ridge 


Scott Church 


Linda Mills 


Kenneth Ridings 


1988 Laytown 


Scott Church 


Linda Mills 


Carter Moretz 


1989 Long Ridge 


Scott Church 


Linda Mills 


Alex Booth 


1989 Mt, Ephriam 


Scott Church 


Linda Mills 


Carter Moretz 


1990 Rock Spring 


George Berry 


Linda Mills 


Scott Church 


1990 Sandy Flat 


George Berry 


Linda Mills 


Max West 



The churches, Buffalo Cove. Cool Springs, Wilkes County Elk, Stony Fork and Yellow Hill, formerly belonging to other 
associations. 

Met at the Stony Fork Baptist Church and organized the Stony Fork Baptist Association on November 9th and 10th, 1860, 
for this meeting appointed Elder Larkin Hodges, Moderator and Bro. Elijah Trivette, Clerk. 



STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



Table A — Church Membership and Other Information 



TABLE A CHURCH MEMBERSHIP AND OTHER INFORMATION YEAR ENDING July 31. 1990 




1 


*"S¥?;i?y Fork (Month SDayl 




Pastor v/N 1 


^"Worth Carolina 


Oifeciof of Assoctational Missions 

Burl Jones 


Addresspjj- ^ Box 737 ^'^^ S\ale Zip 
Boomer North Carolina 28605 


CHURCHES 


PASTORS & ADDRESSES (INCLUDE ZIP CODE! 


Count 


Bailey Camp 


None 


Caldwell 


N 


Boone Fork 


Bill Wright, P.O. Box 5592, Lenoir, N.C. 28645 


Watauga 


V 


Doe Ridge 


None 


Watauga 


N 


Laytown 


None 


Caldwell 


N 


Long Ridge 


George Berry, Rt. 1, Box 318, Sugar Grove, N.C. 28657 


Avery 


Y 


Mt. Ephriam 


Burl Jones, Rt. 1, Box 737, Boomer, N.C. 28606 


Watauga 


Y 


Rock Spring 


Scott Church, Rt. 1, Box 120, Purlear, N.C. 28665 


Wilkes 


Y 


Sandy Flat 


Max West, Rt. 1, Box Blowing Rock, N.C. 28605 


Watauga 


Y 
































































1 











































































BSSB - 1297 (Rev 1-89) 


TOTALS 


PREVIOUS YEAR TOTALS 



2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


Year pastor came 


Year organized as a church 


J 

i 

o 


1 Two Sunday services Y/N | 


Baptisms under 6 yrs ot age 


Baptisms 6-8 yrs ol age 


Baptisms 9-1 1 yrs ot age 


Baptisms 12-17 yrs ol age 


Baptisms 18-29 yrs ot age 


Baptisms 30-59 yrs ol age 


Baptisms 60 yrs & over 


Total Baptisms 


Other additions (by letter 
statement, etc ) 


Members lost (by letter, 
death, statement, etc ) 


Present resident members 


Present nonresident members 


Grand total present members 


— 


1938 


1 


N 





























2 


54 


20 


74 


11990 


1872 


1 


Y 











2 











2 


7 


1 


32 





32 




1894 


1 


Y 





























1 


48 


20 


68 




1939 


1 


N 
































30 


39 


69 


p89 


1945 


1 


Y 
































37 


17 


54 


1990 


1876 


1 


Y 





























3 


34 


121 


155 


1985 


1891 


1 


Y 





3 





2 











5 





4 


90 


7 


97 


1980 


1928 


1 


Y 














1 








1 





1 


70 


18 


88 










































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































3 





4 


1 








8 


7 


12 


395 


242 


637 































I 



Table B — Sunday School 



TARI F R <;iJNnAY fiCHODI VFfln FMHIfUf^ JUly 31/ l^yO 


54 


55 


56 1 


Association (Month & Oavl 
Stony Fork 


Cradle Roll enrollment 
IBirth to 2 yearsl 


Preschool enrollment 
IBirth through 5 yearsl 


Children enrollment 

16-1 1 years or grades 1-6) 


State 

North Carolina 


Associalional Sunday School Director 
Danny Crowder 


Address City State Zip 
Rt. 2, Newland N.C. 28657 


CHURCHES 


SUNDAY SCHOOL DIRECTORS & ADDRESSES (INCLUDE ZIP COOEI 


Bailey Camp 


Owen Tolbert, Blow.it^ Rock, N.C. 28605 





2 


3 


Boone Fork 


Dale Luttrell, Rt. 1, Box 650, Blowing Rock, N.C. 28605 





4 


5 


Doe Ridge 


Clay Eggers, Rt. 5, Boone, N.C. 28607 











Lay town 


Jerry Gragg, Rt. 2, Box 18B, Ferguson, N.C. 28624 








1 


Lonq Ridqe 


Danny Crowder , Rt. 2, Newland, N.C. 28657 





6 


3 


Mt. Ephraim 


Buster Henderson, 105 Sheridan Ave., Boone, N.C. 28607 








2 


Rock Spring 


Mrs. Ted Triplett, Rt. 2, Ferguson, N.C. 28624 





6 


13 


Sandy Flat 


Michael Moody, Rt. 1, Blowing Rock, N.C. 28605 





3 


8 












































































































































































BSS8 ■ 1297 (Rev 1-89) 


TOTALS 





21 


35 


PREVIOUS YEAR TOTALS 











57 


58 


59 


60 


61 


62 


63 


64 


65 


66 


67 


68 


69 


70 


71 


72 


73 


Youth enrollment 

11217 years or grarJes 7-1 21 


Young Adult enrollmeni -Single 
{1 8-29 years or H S graduation 
through 29 years) 


Young Adult enrollment -Marnec 
(18-29 years or H S graduation 
through 29 years) 


Adult enrollment 
130-59 years) 


Senior Adult enrollment 
160 and over) 


Adults Away enrollmeni 


Homebound enrollment 


General officers enrollmeni 


■5 
E 

£-5 


T^tal ongoing Sunday 
School enrollmeni 


Average weekly Sunday 
School attendance 


Number in Outreach 
Bible Study groups 


1 Weekly evangelistic visilation 
1 Y-ves N=nc 


Number ethnic Sunday 
School members 


Church V B S, 

enrollmeni 


Mission V.B.S. 
enrollment 


Backyard Bible Oub enrollment 


1 


3 


1 


11 


6 








2 





29 


21 





N 





35 








6 


6 





12 











1 





34 


23 





N 





36 








1 


3 





12 

















16 


12 




N 


Q 


Q 




n 
u 


5 


1 


2 


10 


3 








1 





24 


18 





N 





22 


Q 


Q 


5 


5 


2 


14 


6 








5 





46 


35 





N 





39 








1 


4 


9 





10 








4 





30 


30 





Y 







Q 


Q 


9 


3 


4 


33 


7 








g 





80 


55 






Q 




U 





8 


2 


6 


19 


12 








2 





60 


38 


Q 




u 




U 





































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































36 


27 


24 


111 


44 








21 





319 


232 










2 56 











































1 duic V- — ^nurcn i raining 


TABLE C CHURCH TRAINING YEAR ENDING July 31 , 1 QQA 


74 


Association (Monlh & Davl 

Stony Fork 




State 

North Carolina 


o 
c 

p 1 


Associational Church Training Director 

Charles Craig 


ollmei 
undei 


Address City State Zip 
Rt. 3, Box 730 Boone N.C. 28607 




CHURCHES 


CHURCH TRAINING DIRECTORS & ADDRESS (INCLUDE ZIP CODE) 


« Si O 

^ O 


Boone Fork 


Lloyd Buckner, P.O. Box 1984,Blowina Rock, N.C. 28605 


1 


Lonq Ridqe 


Brian Anthony, Rt. 2, Newland, N.C. 28657 


1 


Sandy Flat 


Charles Craiq, Rt. 3, Box 730, Boone, N.C. 28607 


1 


Rock Spring 


None 


































































































































BSSB - 1297 (Rew 1-89) 


TOTALS 


3 


PREVIOUS YEAR TOTALS 





75 


76 


77 


78 


79 


80 


81 


82 


83 


84 


85 


86 


Children enrollment 

(6-1 1 years or grades 1-61 


Youth enrollment 

112-17 years or grades 7-121 


Adult enrollment 
11 8 and ouerl 


Equipping Centers 
enrollment 


N C M T /Survial Kit 
enrollment 


MasterLile 
enrollment 


Other enrollment 


Hold File 
enrollment 


General officers enrollment 


Enrollment of missionlsl 
of church 


Total Church 
Training enrollment 


Average v^eekly Church 
Training attendance 


3 


3 


10 

















1 





18 


14 


6 


7 


19 
















1 





34 


?q 


7 


10 


30 











15 





2 





65 


?n 






8 
















8 


8 


























































































































i 








































































1 
























































































































































































































































































































16 


20 


67 











15 





4 





125 


71 




























Table D — Music Ministry 



TABLE D MUSIC MINISTRY YEAR EtgOING July 31 , 1990 


87 


Association (Month & Dayl 
SIzony Fork 


ool enrollment 


Slate 

North Carolina 


Associational Music D.irectoi 
Charles Smith 


Address City State Zip 
Rt. 5, box 327, Lenoir N.C. 28645 


CHURCHES 


MUSIC DIRECTORS & ADDRESSES (INCLUDE ZIP CODEI 


6i 


Sandy Flat 


Kathy Townsend, Rt. 3, Boone, N.C. 28607 


1 


Rock Spring 


Mr. stony Triplett, RoutP2, Ferquson, N.C. 28624 















































































































































BSSB • 1297 (Rev 1-69) 


TOTALS 


1 


PREVIOUS YEAR TOTALS 





88 


89 


90 


91 


92 


93 


94 


95 


96 


97 


98 


Younger children's enroilmenl 
(6-8 years) 


Older children's enrollment 
(9-11 years) 


Youth enroilmenl 
(12-17 years) 


Adult enrollment 
118 and overl 


HancJbell nngers enrollment 


Vocal ensembles enrollment 


Instrumental ensembles 
enrollment 


General music 
leaders enrollment 


Enrollment of Mission(s) 
ol church 


Total ongoing Music Ministry 
enrollment 


Average weekly Music 
Ministry allendance 


5 


4 


7 














2 





19 


8 


5 


3 


11 


17 











5 





41 


37 






























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































10 


7 


18 


17 











7 





60 


44 

























Table E — Woman's Missionary Gnion 



TABLE E WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UN(ON YFAR FNniNn .7n1y ^1, 1 QOn 


99 


Association (Month & Dayl 
Stony Fork 




State 

North Carolina 


s and 

not in school) 


Associational WMU Director 
Riinirp r.ntf-rpl 1 


^''i'f" 1 r, City State Zip 
Rt. 1, Box 650 Blowing Rock, N.C. 28605 


CHURCHES 


WMU DIRECTORS & ADDRESSES (INCLUDE ZIP CODE! 




Bcxjne Fork 


Rosetta Hollifield, Rt. 1, Box 597, Blowing Rock, N.C. 28605 





Laytown 


Vera Dula, Rt. 1, Box 102, Ferguson, N.C. 28624 





Long Ridge 


Norma Jean Crowder 





Rocik Spring 


Linda Church, Rt. 1, Box 120, Purlear, N.C. 28665 


1 


Sandy Flat 


Barbara West, Rt. 1, Blowing Rock, N.C. 28605 



































BSSB - 1297 (rte» 1-89) 


TOTALS 


1 


PREVIOUS YEAR TOTALS 





Table F — Brotherhood 



TAHi F F BBnTHFRHfinn vFARFNi^iNn July 31, 1990 


114 


Association [Month & Dayl 
Stony Fork 


Lads 

(6-8 years or grades 1-3) 


State 

North Carolina 


Associational Brotherhood Director 

Dennis Oakes R^ , Ff^rrjn^nn N.r. 


Address City State Zip 


CHURCHES 


BROTHERHOOD DIRECTORS & ADDRESSES (INCLUDE ZIP CODE) 


Rock Spring 


Dennis Oaks, Rt. 2, Ferguson, N.C. 28624 




























BSSB - 1297 (Rev. 1-69) 


TOTALS 




PREVIOUS YEAR TOTALS 





I 



100 101 102 103 104 



Numbei of Organizations 



(6-1 1 yeofs or 
grades 1-61 


Acteens 
112-17 years or 
grades 7 121 


I 

if 

m 

Ml 


Baptist Women 
130 and overl 


o 

!' 


Total number of 
organizations 


l^ission Friends 

15 years and under- 

not in sctiooll 


Girls in Action 
(6-1 1 years ot 
grades 1-61 


Acteens 
112-17 years or 
grades 7-121 


Baptist Young Women 
(18-29 years or H S 
graduation through 29 
yearsl 


Baptist Women 
(30 and overl 


WMU officers 


Mission(s) of 
church 


Total ongoing 
WI^U enrollment 











1 





1 














4 


2 





6 




1 





1 





2 








5 


1 


10 


3 





19 





1 





1 





2 








6 


2 


7 


2 





17 




1 





1 





4 


2 


4 


4 





9 


1 





20 











1 


Q 


1 














5 


2 





7 














































































































































1 


3 





5 





10 


2 


4 


15 


3 


35 


10 





69 































115 


116 


117 


118 


119 


120 


121 1 122 


123 


Crusaders 

(9-11 years or grades 4-6) 


Pioneers 

(12-14 years or grades 7-9) 


RA director and commillee 


High school Bapiisi Young 
Men enrollmenl 


Baplisl Young Men 
enrollmenl 


Baplisl Men enrollmenl 


Brotherhood director and 
other general Brotherhood 
Officers 


Enrollment of missionlsl 
of church 


Total ongoing Brotherhood 
enrollment 




7 














7 












































































7 














7 





















Table G — Total Receipts, Local Expenditures & Stewardship 



TABLE G TOTAl BFrFlPTS 1 Or Al FXPENDITUflES & STFW/ARnqHIP YF*B FNniNR July 31, 1990 


124 


Association (Month & Oayl 
Stony Fork 


Undesignatec) gifts 
offerings, etc 


State 

North Carolina 


Associationai Treasurer 
Edity Gryder 


AdcJress City State Zip 
Rt. 2, Box 182 Blowniq Rock, N.C 28605 


CHURCHES 


TREASURER & ADDRESSES (INCLUDES ZIP CODEl 


Bailey Camp 


Mabel McLean, Rt. 8, Lenoir, N.C. 28645 


7143 


Boone Fork 


Linda Mills, Rt. 1, Box 596, Blowing Rock, N.C. 28605 


4028 


Doe Ridge 


Pauline Eldreth, 434 Grand Blvd., Boone, N.C. 28607 


5674 


Laytovm 


Glenda Dillard, Rt. 5, Box 324, Lenoir, N.C. 28645 


8651 


Long Ridge 


Carol Thomas, Rt. 2, Box 507, Newland, N.C. 28657 


12180 


Mt. Ephraira 


Shirlene Watson, Rt. 1, Box 433, Deep Gap, N.C. 28618 


14276 


Rock Spring 


Sandy Woods, Rt. 2, Ferguson, 28624 


19436 


Sandy Flat 


Charles Craig, Rt. 3, Box 730, Boone, N.C. 28607 


23675 








































































































aSS8 • 1297 (Rev 1-69) 


TOTALS 


95054 


PREVIOUS YEAR TOTALS 





125 


126 


127 


126 


'29 


130 


131 


132 


133 


134 


135 


Designated Gilts, 
Ollenngs, etc. 


Total tithes, all ollenngs 
and special gilts 


All other receipls 


Total Receipts 


Money borrowed 
during the year 


5 


Money paid out on new 
construction during the 
year 


Debt reiiremeni dunng 




All other local 
expenditures 


1 

Q. 

O 
O 


177 


7320 





7320 





600 


Q 


Q 


435 




3248 


7801 


11849 





11849 





3750 


Q 


A 


448 


1137 


5335 


1382 


7056 





7056 


Q 


1600 


u 





80 


1989 


■^66Q 


1148 


9799 


Q 


9799 





3600 








196 


4181 


7677 


3187 


15367 


Q 


15367 


Q 


4140 







fSOS 


1640 


QUO 


2820 

' 


17096 





17096 


Q 


6550 


2820 


u 


146 


1865 


11381 


6080 


25516 





25515 


Q 


10300 


n 
u 





600 


3918 


1 ART A 





23675 





23675 


Q 


3283 








641 


6792 


1 071 A 
































































































































































































































































































i 


































































1 

1 






















1 22595 


117678 





117678 





33823 


2870 


3387 


3153 


23735 


66618 

























i 

I 



I 



Table H — Mission Expenditures 



TABLE H MISSION EXPENDITURES YEAR ENDING _ JulV— 


136 1 137 


Association (Month & Day) 
Stonv Fork 


CHURCH SPONSORED 


Money paid out on new 
construction during the 
year 


Ad other church 
sponsored mission 
expenditures 


State 

North Carolina 


Associational Cleik 
Linda Mills 


Address City State Zip 
Rt. 1, Box 596 Rlowinq Rfv-V, M r ^Rf^nr; 


CHURCHES 


CHURCH CLERKS & ADDRESSES (INCLUDES ZIP CODE! 


Bailey Camp 


Roy Grvder, Rt. 2, box 182, Blowing Rrv-k, N r ■>Rf.n'=. 








Boone Fork 


Eunice Luttrell, Rt. 1, Box 650, Blowinq Rock, N.C. 28605 








Doe Ridge 


Pauline Eldreth, 434 Grand Blvd., Boone, N.C. 28607 








Laytown 


Bonnie Walsh, Rt. 5, Box 315, Lenoir, N.C. 28645 








Lonq Ridqe 


Carol Thomas, Rt. 2, Box 507, Newland, N.C. 28657 








Mt . Eptiraim 


Lezette Greer, Rt. 1, Box 231, Deep Gap, N.C. 28618 








Rock Sorinq 


Betty Woods, Rt. 2, Box 43, Ferquson, N.C. 28624 








Sandy Flat 


Jerry Moretz, Rt. 5, Box 67, Boone, N.C. 28607 
















































































































































esse - 1297 (Rev 1-89) 


TOTALS 








PREVIOUS YEAR TOTALS 







OTHER MISSION CAUSE EXPENDITURES 



Total church sponsored 
mission expenditures 


Cooperative Program 


Associational missions 
program 


State missions 


SB Home 

Missions (incl Annie Arm- 
strong Easter ofleringl 


SB Foreign 
Missions lincl. Lottie 
Moon Christmas offering) 


SB Christian 

education (schools, etc) 


SB Children's 
homes 

leash plus goods) 


SB Hospitals 


SB Homes 
lor the aged 


All other (Bible 
Society. Temperance 
League, etc.) 


Total other mission 
cause expenditures 


Grand Total 
Mission expenditures 
































1117 


1117 


1117 





453 


690 


214 


250 


220 





329 


200 


150 





2053 


4559 





285 


315 





293 








1382 











1990 


2175 





200 


315 








400 

















715 


915 





1525 








74 


305 

















379 


1904 





1462 


600 





1799 




















2399 


3851 





2886 


1026 


172 


511 


1500 














2742 


5951 


8837 





292 


2414 


1500 


1000 


1927 





1113 


140 


140 


4216 


12450 


12742 












































































































































































































































i 


























i 








































































































t 


























1 


























1 


























'1 


7114 


5360 


1886 


3927 


4352 





2824 


340 


290 


8075 


27054 


36110 


1' 



























Table I — Special Information 



TABLE 1 SPECIAL INFORMATION 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


Association 

Stony Fork 


No. members received from 
non-Baptist Churches 


No members lost to non- 
Baptist Churches 


Number ol tithers 


Cooperative Program goal as 
percent ol undesignated receipts 


Associalional missions goal as 
percent of undesignated receipts 


Total cosi lor heating, cooling, 
lighting, etc 


Value ol church property 


Total church debt at end ol 
this associalional year 


E 

s 

1° 
E 

i i 

US 

e 

|l 


Budget Y/N 


No church-lype missions 
started during the year 


No church-lype missions 
currently operating 


State 

North Carolina 


Ye.,Fnd,nn ^^^V 31, ^990 
(Moniti & Ody) 


CHURCHES 


Bailey Camp 








2 










75,000 





N 


N 








Boone Fork 








7 


10 







100,000 





N 


N 








Doe Ridqe 








6 


5 


5 




65,000 





N 


Y 








Lavtown 








5 










50,000 





N 


N 








Long Ridge 








8 


11 


4 




80,000 


3105 


N 


N 








Mt. Ephraim 











10 







85,000 





N 


Y 








Rock Spring 








35 


16 


5 




150,000 





N 


Y 








Sandy Flat 








16 


1 


10 










N 


N 


































































































































































































































































































































































































































































TOTALS 








79 






605,000 


3105 












PREVIOUS YEAR TOTALS 



















I 



32 


33 


34 


35 


36 


37 


M 


39 




41 


42 1 43 1 44 1 45 { 46 1 47 1 44 1 49 1 so 1 51 1 52 1 S3 


§ 

1 

fi 


(S) Lottie Moon ottering 


(S) Annie Armstrong ottering 


Number ot ctiurcti vocation 
volunteers 


e B 

If 


No in Sunday Sctiool 
bul not church member 


College students baptized 


Number ol male members 


p 

ii 

II 


9- 

ll 
II 


Does chufcti have, observe, p^n, use, elc ' J^^i*" 


Weekly Workers Meeting 


1 
1 

1 

1 


Family Ministry 


Christian Lite Committee 


BMT prayer activities 


Bapt Sem Coll Day 


Prop & casualty ms 


Literacy ministry 


Capital Funds Campaign 


RA Week 


1 

1 
1 


State paper m budget 














N 










N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


7 


220 


250 





N 










N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


Y 














N 










N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


2 











N 










N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 





304 


74 





N 










N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


j\ 




N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 











Q 


N 










N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


[\ 




N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


3 


1500 


511 


Q 


N 


3 







N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 






N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


1 


1927 


1000 


Q 


N 




Q 




N 


N 




N 










N 








N 




















































































































































































1 




































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































j 


























































































3951 


1835 







4 
























HOWARD 
CREEK RD. 



DOE RIDGEI 



Stony Fork Missionary Baptist Association Churches 



AVERY CO. 



SEVEN 
DEVILS 



BOONE 



705 



LINVILLEj 



SANDY FLATI 



?27 



BOONE FORKI 



221 



°o 



1 ORK 



BLOWING! 
ROCK 



n 



pi/ NEW HOPEWELL 
1517 



LONG RIDGE 



OLD 



I ON AS 



GRAGG 



RD. 



GLOBE 



BAILEYS 
CAMP ■ 




TO 
NORTH 
WILKESBORO 
421 



WILKES CO. 



WATAUGA 



OUNT VIEW 



1500 



BAILEYS 
CAMP 



i-^ CALDWELL CO. 



LAYTOWN 



BUFFALO COVE RD. 



268 y^^^lo^o 



'6? 



^0 



^^^^ a^''- 



1 




1991 Annual 





tonp Jforfe 



iSortd Carolina 



STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATIOM 



MINUTES 
of the 

STONY FORK MISSIONARY 
BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 
NORTH CAROLINA 
1991 

ONE HUNDRED THIRTIETH ANNUAL SESSION 

Held with 
Bailey's Camp, August 9, 1991 

and with 
Boone Fork, August 10, 1991 



The one hundred and thirty-first session will be held with Doe Ridge on August 7, 
1992 and Laytown on August 8, 1992. 



STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Suggested Order of Business 3 

Officers for the Association 4 

Constitution 5 

Proceedings 13 

Baptist Cfiildren's Homes of Nortfi Carolina 20 

Baptist Retirement Homes of North Carolina 22 

North Carolina Baptist Hospital 23 

Baptist College 24 

Baptist Foundation 25 

Cooperative Program 26 

Vacation Bible School 28 

Treasurer Report 29 

Proposed Budgetl99M992 30 

Christian Action League 30 

Foreign Missions 32 

Discipleship Training 33 

Obituaries 34 

Resolutions 34 

History and Historical Tables 35 

Tables 39 



STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATIOIN 



3 



SUGGESTED ORDER OF BUSINESS FOR 1992 
ANNUAL MEETING OF THE STONY FORK 
MISSIONARY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



FRIDAY MORNING, AGGCIST 7, 1992 
DOE RIDGE 

8:30 Call to Order Moderator 

8:35 Song Song Leader 

8:40 Devotion Pastor of Host Church 

8:50 Adoption of Program Moderator 

9:00 Roll Call Clerk 

9:05 Recognition of New Pastors & Workers Moderator 

9:10 VBS Barbara West 

9:15 Foreign Missions Scott Church 

9:25 Sunday School Danny Crowder 

9:30 Cooperative Program Pauline Berry 

9:40 Evangelism George Berry 

9:50 Finance Report — Budget Edith Gryder 

10:00 Break 

10:10 Home Missions Vera Dula 

10:25 State Missions Wanda Winkler 

10:40 Children's Homes Jeri Triplett 

10:55 Retirement Homes Mamie Craig 

11:10 Baptist Hospital Linda Church 

11:25 Christian Education Edith Gryder 

11:40 Baptist Foundation Dale Luttrell 

11:55 Stewardship Speaker 

12:10 Annual Message Speaker 

1:00 Adjourn — Lunch 

SATURDAY MORNING, AUGUST 8, 1992 
LAYTOWN 

8:30 Call to Order Moderator 

8:35 Song Song Leader 

8:40 Devotion Pastor of Host Church 

8:50 Roll Call Clerk 

8:55 Biblical Recorder Lloyd Buckner 

9:05 Discipleship Training Charles Craig 



4 



STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



9:15 WMU Eunice Luttrell 

9:25 Temperance & Morals — CAL Sharon Craig 

9:40 Director of Missions BurlJones 

9:50 General Board Report Roy Gryder 

9:55 Stewardship Report Roy Gryder 

10:00 Break 

10:10 Resolutions Betty Woods 

10:15 Obituaries Clerk 

10:20 Business 

Election of officers 

Approve budget 

Discuss bylaws, time, place preacher 

1 1:00 Annual Message Speaker 

12:00 Adjourn — Lunch 



OFFICERS FOR STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 
1991 - 1992 

Director of Missions Burl Jones, Rt. 1 , Box 737, Boomer, NC 28605 

Telephone: 919-921-3312 

Moderator George Berry, Rt. 1 , Box 3 1 8, Sugar Grove, NC 28679 

Telephone: 704-297-1223 

Treasurer Edith Gryder, Rt. 1 , Box 1 82, Blowing Rock, NC 28605 

Telephone: 704-295-3410 

Clerk Linda Mills, Rt. 1, Box 596, Blowing Rock, NC 28605 

Telephone: 704-295-7095 

WMU Director Eunice Luttrell, Rt. 1, Box 650, Blowing Rock, NC 28605 



Telephone: 704-295-7732 

Sunday School Director Danny Crowder 

Discipleship Training Charles Craig, Rt. 3, Box 730, Boone, NC 28607 

Telephone: 704-963-4120 

Brotherhood Director Dennis Oaks, Rt. 2, Ferguson, NC 28624 



Evangelism Director George Berry, Rt. 1, Box 318, Sugar Grove, NC 28679 

Telephone: 704-297-1223 

Stewardship Director Roy Gryder, Rt. 2, Box 182, Blowing Rock NC 28605 

Telephone: 704-295-3410 



STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



5 



CONSTITUTION 

OF THE STONY FORK M ISSIONARY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION (PROPOSED) 

PREAMBLE 

For the declaration of Its fundamental purposes and the permanent guidance 
and control of its activities, the body does adopt the following as its constitution, 
to wit: 

ARTICLE I— Name and Membership 

Section 1. This body shall be known as the Stony Fork Missionary Baptist 
Association of North Carolina. 

Section 2. The Association shall be composed of Missionary Baptist Churches. 

Section 3. Any Baptist Church may be admitted into this Association upon 
recommendation of the Committee of Petitionary Letters and Constitution of the 
Churches Committee and the majority vote of members present at any meeting as 
prescribed in Article IX. 

Section 4. Any Church at her discretion, may withdraw from this body. 

Section 5. This Association may at any meeting, after an investigation and 
report of a duly authorized committee of the Association, by a majority vote declare 
a dissolution of union with any church deemed corrupt, either in doctrine or practice. 

Section 6. Each church shall elect its messengers to the Annual Associational 
meeting. Each messenger must be certified in the annual church letter to the Associ- 
ation and must be appointed on the following ratio: Five messengers, in addition 
to the pastor, for each church having a membership not exceeding fifty, and one 
additional messenger for each increase of fifty. In no case shall the total number of 
messengers exceed ten for any given church, in addition to the pastor. 

Section 7. When any church shall fail to be represented by letter or messenger 
for two consecutive years, the missions committee shall confer with church, and if 
satisfactory reason is not given, and there is no evidence that said church wishes to 
keep alive their affliation with the Association, the committee shall bring its findings 
to the next Executive Committee Meeting, the Association shall at that time by a 
majority of present members shall vote to withdraw fellowship. The Association 
recognizes the right of any affiliated church to withdraw its fellowship from the 
Association. 

Section 8. The Annual Associational meeting shall convene on Friday at 
9:00 a.m., Recess from 12:00 noon to 1:10 p.m. for the noon meal and adjourn 
on or before 4:00 p.m. It shall reconvene at 9:00 a.m. on Saturday and adjourn 
at the completion of business for the noon meal. This following the first Sunday 
in August. 

ARTICLE ll-Purpose 

Section 1. The prime purpose of the Association shall be to counsel together 
for the enlargement and strengthening of God's kingdom and to promote unity and 
growth among the churches composing it. 

Section 2. It shall be the purpose of this Association to enlist all of the churches 
into full cooperation with the North Carolina Baptist State Convention and the 
Southern Baptist Convention and their agencies in the work of missions, evangelism, 
christian education and social service. 



6 



STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



ARTICLE ill— Powers and Perogatives 
Section 1. The Association, when convened in meeting, shall sit as an advisory 
council and shall have no power to infringe on any of the internal rights or affairs 
of the member churches. It may advise however, with the member churches and 
recommend measures of usefulness for their adoption or rejection. 

Section 2. When grievances occur between any member of minority group of 
any church which is a member of the Association, the Association, the Executive 
Committee, or Missions Committee, or the committee designated by and acting for 
either of these bodies, may advise or give aid in matters which do not infringe on the 
rights of the local church, and this only on the invitation of the individual or group 
involved. 

Section 3. Any church found unfaithful to the faith and practices common to 
the Association, as outlined in Addendum I— ARTICLES OF FAITH (The Baptist 
Faith and Message as adopted by the Southern Baptist Convention in 1963) shall be 
encouraged to correct such errors, if the conduct of said church is not corrected and 
is of such nature as to alienate said church from the orderly and faithful churches 
of the Association, the Executive Committee of the Association can recommend 
that fellowship be withdrawn from said church, and upon a majority vote of the 
messengers in an Annual session, fellowship with such church can be withdrawn. 
(See Article I, Section 7) 

ARTICLE IV— The Executive Committee 

Section 1. The Association shall have an Executive Committee to serve as the 
Association between Annual Meetings, assisting in the overall work of the Association 
with such limitations as may be imposed by the constitution. 

Section 2. The Executive committee shall be composed of the Associational 
officers and the Pastors, and the Chairman of Deacons along with two elected lay 
persons from each church. Sixteen members shall constitute a quorum. The names 
of these persons shall be furnished annually to the Associational Clerk, if changes 
occur during the Associational year, these changes shall be forwarded to the Clerk. 

Section 3. At the beginning of each Executive Committee Meeting, a roll call 
will be taken of each church and its representatives. 

Section 4. The Executive Committee shall meet within two weeks after the 
Annual Associational Meeting, the second Sunday of November, March, and July. 
These meetings shall be held in churches of the Association, consecutively, in Alpha- 
betical order. 

ARTICLE V-Officers 

Section!. The officers of this body shall be: Moderator, Vice-Moderator, 
Clerk, Treasurer, Sunday School Director, Church Training Director, Brotherhood 
Director, W.M.U. Director, Vacation Bible School Director, Music Director, Pianist, 
Evangelism Director, and Youth Coordinator. 

Section 2. The officers of the Association shall be elected at each regular 
Annual Associational Meeting. The Nominating Committee shall fill vacancies that 
may occur in their respective categories between annual meetings of the association 
by bringing names to the Executive Committee for their approval. 

Section 3. By the virtue of the office, the Associational Director of Missions 
IS considered an ex-officio member of all Associational Committees. For all quali- 
fications and terms of office see Article VII , Section 1 . 

] 



STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



7 



ARTICLE Vl-Dutles of Officers 

Section 1. It shall be the duty of the Moderator of the Association to preside 
over the Annual Sessions, special sessions, and at the quarterly meetings of the 
Executive Committee. As the presiding officer, he shall open the meetings punc- 
tually at the appointed time, enforce the rules, preserve order, and exercise all the 
perogatives of a presiding officer according to the principles of established parll- 
mentary usage. He shall provide leadership for a progressive ideal throughout the 
association. He shall be elected for a one year term, and he shall not succeed himself 
for a maximum of two full terms. He shall appoint in advance any other committees 
he may deem necessary or advisable. Each of these committees shall report at the 
Annual Meeting for which they are appointed. It shall be the responsibility of the 
Moderator to call any needed meetings at any time he deems necessary. The Moder- 
ator is considered an ex-officio member of all committees. 

Section 2. It shall be the duty of the Vice-Moderator to discharge the duties 
of the Moderator in his absence or at his request. 

Section 3. It shall be the duty of the Clerk to keep an accurate record of the 
proceedings of the Association in regular and special sessions; to keep accurate 
records of quarterly meetings of the Executive Committee; to keep on file the printed 
minutes and other important documents belonging to the Association; to furnish 
the churches with the blank letter forms on which to make the annual reports to the 
association; to superintend the printing of the minutes, and to distribute them to 
the churches as soon after adjournment as possible. For this service the clerk shall 
be paid annually an amount recommended by the Finance Committee and approved 
by the association. 

Section 4. It shall be the duty of the Treasurer to receive all funds of the assoc- 
iation and to disburse the same in accordance with the budget of the association or 
for the purposes for which the funds were contributed. To render to the association 
an itemized report of the receipts and disbursements at the first session of the annual 
meeting. In the treasurers absence a member of the Finance Committee shall give the 
report. The Treasurer shall make available through the associational newsletter a 
quarterly report including the contributions of each church in the association. A 
quarterly report shall be made available at the quarterly meetings of the Executive 
Committee. For this service, the treasurer shall be paid annually an amount rec- 
ommended by the Finance Committee and approved by the association. 

Section 5. The Sunday School Director shall take the initiative in promoting 
inspirational meetings, study courses, and leadership classes for the churches of the 
association. He shall work in cooperation with the denominational Sunday School 
Agencies in promoting the denominational programs; and he will be responsible for 
coordinating and promoting Vacation Bible School work in conjunction with the 
Vacation Bible Director. He shall also work with the Nominating Committee in 
enlisting leadership for his organization. 

Section 6. The Church Training Director shall take the initiative in promoting 
the regular meetings projected by the State Convention and be available to the 
churches for help in strengthening the established unions and encourage the organi- 
zation of new unions in churches without them. He shall also work with the Nomi- 
nating Committee in enlisting leadership for his organization. 

Section 7. The Brotherhood Director shall be responsible for promoting mis- 
sionary education within our association and be available to the churches to assist 
in strengthening organizations and programs of existing units. He shall also work 
with the Nominating Committee in enlisting leadership for his organization. 

Section 8. Thr WMU Director shall be responsible for promoting missionary 



8 



STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



education within our association and she shall be available to the churches to assist 
in promoting and establishing new Baptist Women and Baptist Women Auxiliary 
units, and shall assist in strengthening the organizations and programs of existing 
units. She shall also work with the Nomination Committee In enlisting leadership 
for her organization. 

Section 9. The Vacation Bible Director shall work in conjunction with the 
Associational Sunday School Director in enlisting and training workers, planning and 
organizing for the annual Vacation Bible School Clinic. 

Section 10. The Music Director shall take the initiative in promoting the meetings 
and activities suggested by the state music leadership and be available to the churches 
to help in strengthening their music programs. The music director will also be respon- 
sible for the music at the Associational and Executive Committee Meetings. He 
shall also work with the Nominating Committee in enlisting leadership for his organ- 
ization. 

Sectionll. The Pianist will be responsible for playing the piano at all Associa- 
tional and Executive Committee meetings. 

Section 12. The Evangelism Chairman will work with the Evangelism programs 
in planning, promoting, and coordinating all Evangelistic activities for the associa- 
tion in conjunction with the Director of Missions. 

ARTICLE Vll-Director of Missions 
Statement of Purpose and Position Title: 

The office or position will be known as the Director of Missions for the Stony Fork 
Missionary Baptist Association. The Director of Missions shall provide responsible 
leadership in the work of the association through performing such basic functions 
as the planning, correlation, and implementation of programs, program services, and 
ministries of the association; counsel the churches; agencies of needs, problems, and 
potentialities within the association; and interpret to the churches the program 
resources and other assistance available from the Baptist State Convention and 
Southern Baptist Convention agencies. 
Section 1. RESPONSIBILITIES 

A. Planning and Coordination 

1. Lead the association in strategy planning; establishing and maintaining a 
long-range program. Lead the association to set goals and encourage the churches 
to work toward them. 

2. Coordinate the associational work and meetings by serving as ex-officio 
member of all committees. 

3. Work with program officers and the Nominating Committee in selecting 
and enlisting leaders for organizations and committees of the association. 

4. Counsel, encourage, and lead in training the associational officers. 

B. Education and Promotion 

1. Seek to assist the pastors and the churches in programs suitable for their 
growth and development, recognizing the differences in size and diversity of member- 
ship, utilizing persuasion to promote fellowship and cooperation. 

2. Seek out in cooperation with the Missions Committee places of missions 
need and seek to enlist an appropriate church to meet these needs. In the event no 
church(es) can be enlisted, upon the instruction of the Missions Committee, the 
Director of Missions may lead in such a program in the name of the Stony Fork 
Baptist Association. 

3. Promote church organizational programs: Sunday School, Church Training, 



STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



9 



Church Music, Brotherhood, WMU, and Vacation Bible School and Leadership 
Training. 

4. Promote church assistance programs: Evangelism, Stewardship, and Family 

Life. 

5. Plan for and promote simultaneous efforts, such as: World Missions 
Conferences, revival crusades, enlargement campaigns, training schools, etc. 

6. Prepare in cooperation with the Missions Committee an annual associa- 
tional calendar. Prepare a monthly associational newsletter for distribution in the 
association. 

7. Attend denominational meetings and conferences as budget and time 
considerations permit. 

8. Report to the executive boards at its regular meetings and to the associ- 
ation in annual session. 

C. Service Ministry 

1 . Provide counsel and help as requested by pastors and churches. 

2. Serve as pulpit supply, assist in church surveys, and conduct studies and 
revivals as requested in keeping with terms of employment. Pulpit supply for a 
period of 4 weeks. 

3. Manage the associational office, supervise associational employees, and 
maintain equipment of the association. 

4. Cooperate with the Finance Committee in planning the budget and pro- 
moting giving to the association. 

5. Establish and announce office hours to best utilize the division of time 
between the associational office and field responsibilities. 

6. Always working through the pastor, the Director of Missions will be 
available to offer aid to churches in need of assistance. No program will be con- 
ducted for a church without the invitation of the pastor and/or church. In the 
event the church is without a pastor, the Director of Missions will respond to requests 
from the church leadership. 

Section 2. TERMS OF EMPLOYMENT 

A. Term of Office-Thc Director of Missions shall be called for an indefinite term 
of service. 

B. Remuneration-Remuneration will be recommended by the Missions and 
Finance Committees and approved by the Stony Fork Baptist Association. 

C. Honorariums-Honorariums received for pulpit supply, weddings, funerals, 
revivals, and pastoral service, not directly related to his normal responsibilities, shall 
be considered personal remuneration. 

D. Work Schedule-Work schedules will vary, with weekends normally being 
kept for services in churches in the association. 

E. Work Accountability-The Missions Committee pledges itself to a ministry of 
loyalty, support, and loving encouragement of the Director of Missions, so that 
under the leadership of the Spirit of God, he may render the most effective service 
possible. 

F. Both parties must give a thirty day notice before termination. 
Sections. QUALIFICATIONS 

A. Spiritual— A commited Christian with a sense of definite call to mission service. 

B. Educational— Preferably college and seminary degrees, or their equivalent. 

C. Special Knowledge and Skills— Knowledge of Baptist denominational life and 
a willingness to continue to learn; vision, flexibility, and demonstrated leadership 
ability in planning, conducting, and evaluating the work of the association. 

D. Character— Christian integrity. 



10 



STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



E. Experience— Pastoral ministry, Christian education or associational and other 
mission experience are necessary. Preferably the associational experience should be 
as a director of missions, associational staff member or as an active and responsible 
officer in an association. The mission experience may be in the establishment of and 
involvement in mission outreach and ministry in a mission, church or association. 

ARTICLE Vlll-Committees and Their Duties 

Section 1. The committee of time, place and preacher shall be composed of 
three members. It shall be the duty of the committee to recommend to the associ- 
ation, the churches where the next session w'lW be held, preferably to be taken in 
alphabetical order, and also the preacher for the annual session. In order to alleviate 
any hardship on any one church hosting as associational meeting, it is suggested that 
two churches may jointly host each meeting. Expenses, meeting places, and other 
arrangements m\\ be coordinated by the churches selected. 

Section 2. The committee on Resolutions shall be composed of two members. 
It shall be the duty of this committee to draw up and present to the association 
suitable resolutions of appreciation and expressions of sentiments on any matter 
chosen by the committee or as directed by the messengers of the association. 

Section 3. The Program Committee shall be composed of the general officers 
of the association. It shall be the duty of this committee to prepare and present a 
suggested order of business to be adopted by the association. When adopted, the 
program becomes the order of business unless changed by common consent or by 
the vote of the body. 

Section 4. The committee of Nominations shall be composed of five members. 
It shall be the duty of the committee to prepare for the association the names of 
individuals as nominees for the following offices and reports: Moderator, Vice- 
Moderator, Treasurer, Clerk, Sunday School Director, Church Training Director, 
Music Director, Vacation Bible School Director, Brotherhood Director, Pianist, 
Evangelism Director, and Associational State Representatives, also persons for the 
following reports shall also be selected; Home Missions, State Missions, Foreign 
Missions, Stewardship, Cooperative Program, Obituaries, Temperance and Morals, 
V.B.S. Report, W.M.U. Report, Sunday School Report, and any others designated 
by the association. Representatives for the following shall be selected: N.C. Baptist 
Hospital, N.C. Childrens Home, Baptist Home for the Aging, Denominational Colleges 
(Christian Education), Denominational Literature (Religious Literature), Annuity 
Board, Baptist Foundation, and any others designated by the association. The com- 
mittee on Nominations shall be responsible for selection and contacting each of 
these persons for their approval before the annual meeting. The floor shall be open 
for nominations for these offices on the day of the annual meeting. Nominations 
from the floor shall be taken first, then the Chairperson of the Nominating 
Committee shall give nomination of committee. All nominees must be contacted 
beforehand and permission given for acceptance of nomination. The W.M.U. will 
elect their officers. 

Section 5. The Finance Committee shall be composed of five members, one of 
which will include the Treasurer of the association. It shall be the duty of this com- 
mittee to prepare and recommend a budget for the association and to suggest ways 
and means whereby the budget can be raised by the local churches and to secure 
the cooperation of the churches in raising the budget. The Finance committee will 
present the proposed budget on the first day of the annual associational meeting 
with discussion and adoption scheduled for the second day. The Finance Com- 
mittee shall meet prior to the quarterly Executive Committee Meeting and shall 



STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



11 



prepare on a regular form acceptable to the association, a detailed financial report 
which will be given to each member present at the quarterly meetings and the annual 
associational meeting. 

Section 6. The Missions Committee shall be composed of five members and this 
committee shall report to and cooperate with the Executive Committee of the 
association. The duties of this committee are: (a) to coordinate and help promote 
through the organizations and committees all phases and activities of the associational 
programs, (b) to cooperate with the local churches in making surveys of areas which 
in the opinion of the Missions Committee are being adequately served by the local 
missionary Baptist work, and to promote and develop those new phases of the 
Missions programs, (c) to serve in advisory capacity to the Director of Missions in 
all matters pertaining to his work and to serve with him in directing and promoting 
the missions programs of the association, (d) to provide information and assistance 
to the departments of State Missions of the North Carolina Baptist Convention in 
meeting local missionary needs, such as Missionary pastor's assistance, promoting 
mission's causes, etc., (e) the Missions Committee shall meet prior to the Executive 
Committee of the Association or at any time necessary to discharge its duties, (f) 
this committee shall have the following responsibilities relating to the office of 
Director of Missions: 

1 . Serve as a search committee for a Director of Missions. 

2. Recommend to the Executive Committee the name of the nominee. 

3. Coordinate financial matters with the Baptist State Convention. 

4. Serve as a liaison between the churches and the Director of Missions. 
Section 7. The Constitution and By-Laws Committee shall be composed of the 

Missions Committee and one :,elected layperson of the association making six mem- 
bers. It shall be the duty of this committee to review and update the Constitution 
and By-Laws as it becomes necessary. This committee will recommend revisions 
and amendments concerning the constitution and By-laws to the association as 
deemed necessary. They shall meet at least once a year before the annual meeting 
to review and discuss the constitution. 

Section 8. The committee of Petitionary Letters and Constitutions of the churches 

ARTICLE IX— Petitionary Letters and Constitutions of the Churches 

The Committee of Petitionary Letters and Constitutions of the Churches shall 
be made up of the Missions Committee members. 

Section 1. Any group of baptized believers in Christ desiring to organize them- 
selves into a missionary Baptist church with the purpose of seeking the recognition 
of and fellowship and cooperate with this association, shall be required to fulfill 
the following requirements. They shall submit their request for admission to the 
Director of Missions or the Moderator of the Association, who will in turn forward 
it to the Committee of Petitionary Letters. In addition to the letter of request, 
a church must also furnish a report of work accomplished since its organization, 
a copy of the church covenant, and its articles of faith. 

Section 2. Any church seeking admission into the fellowship of the Association 
must be under the watchcare of the Association for a period of one year before it 
can be admitted. During this interim period, the church shall be expected to have 
part in the support of the causes fostered by the association, The North Carolina 
State Convention and the Southern Baptist Convention. 

Section 3. The findings of the Committee on Petitionary Letters shall be reported 
at the annual associational meeting or at the Executive Committee meeting with a 
recommendation either for or against admission. 



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STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



Section 4. II the church is accepted under the watchcare of the association, 
the Committee on Petitionary Letters shall recommend at the end of the year that 
the church be accepted into full fellowship provided that examination of that years 
work done and a study of the cooperative spirit of that church proves to be in 
accordance to the principles of the churches of the association. A two-thirds majority 
vote of the Messengers or Executive Committee members present shall be needed 
for such an action to be completed. There will be an appropriate program conducted 
during the annual meeting to formally welcome this new church into the association. 

Section 5. For a sister cooperative Missionary Baptist church that is affliated 
with the Southern Baptist Convention, that wishes to join or transfer status, the same 
procedure is needful with the exception of the one year of associational watchcare. 
Upon receipt of letter of request, the Committee of Petitions shall recommend its 
findings to the Executive Committee, and after a thirty day period of investigation 
the discretion of the Executive Committee shall be used if immediate acceptance of 
fellowship is possible. If accepted, a program of welcoming shall be presented at 
the annual associational meeting. 

ARTICLE X-Amendments 
The constitution or any part of the constitution shall be amended at the annual 
associational meeting in August, with the acceptance by two-thirds majority vote. 
It is suggested that all changes and recommendations of amendments be submitted 
two months prior to annual meeting in August, to the Constitution and By-Laws 
Committee for their careful consideration; however, any messenger has the right 
to submit proposed changes in accordance with this article. 
By-Laws 

1 . All associational meetings shall be opened and closed in prayer. 

2. "Roberts Rules of Order," shall be used as a guideline for parlimentary pro- 
cedure in all associational meetings. The Moderator will be responsible for having 
a copy of same at all meetings and a copy of parlimentary procedure and the gavel 
of the association shall be transferred upon succession of the moderator. 

3. All associational officers shall exercise authority over their departments and 
shall give a financial accounting to the Finance Committee for monies expended. 

4. Election and installation of officers shall take place on the last day of the 
annual associational meeting in August, and these officers shall be responsible for 
planning, coordinating, and providing leadership for the coming year in the associ- 
ation. 

AMENDMENT TO CONSTITGTION AND BYLAWS 

Time, Place and Preacher Committee will be amended to the hosting church 
pastor or a preacher of his choice will be the preacher for the associational meetings. 
Committee membership will be filled according to the number of people par- 
ticipating in associational work. 

AMENDMENT TO CONSTITUTION AND BYLAWS 

Article Vlll-Committees and their duties, Section 4. Amended to: 
recommendations from the Nominating Committee shall be presented first, then 
nominations will be taken from the floor. 



STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



13 



PROCEEDINGS 

On August 9, 1991 Stony Fork Missionary Baptist Association held the first 
day of the annual nneeting at Bailey Camp Baptist Church. The meeting was 
conducted in the following order with reports included at the time they were 
presented. 

9:05 The annual meeting was called to order by the moderator, Rev. George 
Berry. 

9:10 The congregation sang "Victory in Jesus" and "Amazing Grace". 

9:20 Devotion was led by Rev. Max West from St. John 13: 34-35 and 1 

Cornthians 13-1. Prayer led by Rev. Sam Silvec. 
9:30 Adoption of program with changes to be made as needed. 
9:32 Roll call of churches — Bailey Camp 4, Boone Fork 3, Doe Ridge 2, Lay town 

3, Long Ridge 5, Mt. Ephraim 2, Rock Spring 4, Sandy Flat 3. 
9:35 Recognition of new pastors and workers: Sam Silver- Sandy Flat, Eugene 

Fillers - Boone Fork, Arvil Hardy, Doe Ridge, and Max West moved to 

Bailey Camp. 
9:40 Home Missions report - Vera Dula 

9:45 State Missions report - Tom Jenkins was the speaker for these reports. 
"North Carolina is the second largest state after Texas, in starting new 
churches. The State Missions Offering in Sept. helps us to do the work here 
in N.C. Jesus wants us to be a servant as He was a servant when He washed 
his disciple's feet. Each one of us has a towel out there with our name on 
it. We need to pick up our towel and be about our Father's business. There 
are a lot of dirty feet out there for us to wash." 

10:00 Evangelism - George Berry. "Our churches need to quit saying our church 
is too small. God is so big, nothing is too small." 

10:05 Biblical Recorder - Lloyd Buckner 

10:15 Break 

10:30 Children's Homes - Jeri Triplett 

Wilma Greene from Boone spoke to this report telling of her personal 
experiences while working with the children at Mills Home. She told the 
stories of several children whose lives were changed during their stay at 
Baptist Children's homes. 

10:35 Bill Morrow also spoke to this report. "Children are precious to people and 
they want to help. We try to minister to the whole child - physical and 
spiritual. A mile of pennies is a promotion begun by RA's and GA's in small 
churches. 84,400 pennies make a mile and equals $844.40. This is a good 
mission projct." 

10:50 Retirement Homes - Mamie Craig 

Roger Williams - Speaker. "Sometimes we get to a stage in our older life 
when we don't know where we want to go. N.C. Baptist are providing a 
place for us to go. The newest retirement home is in Asheville. 80% of the 
beds are Medicaid approved and N.C. Baptist meets the rest. Nursing 
Home care is one of the most expensive things you can get into today. We 
need to keep our minds on missions. Missions is the antidote for what ails 



14 



STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



a church today. All our residents meet the same admissions criteria. The 
Retirement Homes offering will be gathered in Feb. Come see us! Let us 
know when and someone will show you around." 

11:15 Baptist Hospital - Linda Church 

Calvin Knight, Speaker - "One new Baptist Hospital technology is laser 
surgery on coronary arteries to remove plaque. We are one in only 15 
hospitals in the country who can do this. Sternoplasty is a noninvasive 
procedure to destroy some brain tumors. In the next few months we will add 
a PET scanner which is the latest in radiology and allows measurement of 
cell structures to diagnose cancer early. Baptist Hospital is doing bone 
marrow transplants, one of 24 facilities in the U.S. to do so. We are 
designated as a comprehensive cancer treatment center. JCAHO placed 
NCBH in the top 109% of hospitals in the U.S. providing this type care. We 
are high-tech but couple this with touch-tech care also. I was a patient for 
6 days last year and most nurses and aides did not know me but 1 received 
such care and concern from each shift. A new video tape is coming out with 
interviews with patients within the next year. We could not provide any of 
these services without your prayers and concern. Our Mother's Day 
Offering in May has helped." 

11:30 Annual Message - Jimmy Hubbard 

Isaiah49:13-16. "Beholdl have graven thee upon the palms of my hands". 
This scripture is a blessing to individual Christians and to the church. 
Sometimes things look black and we need to be encouraged. We go 
through difficult periods with sickness, trials and temptations. We wonder 
if we are ever going to be able to do anything for the Lord. As a Southern 
Baptist group we CAN move mountains. Everybody is somebody when we 
are born again. When a Jew was going on a long trip he drew a picture of 
Jerusalem sanctuary on the his palm so he could remember the temple. 
God said a mother will not forget her child and 1 will not forget you. God has 
graven our names on His palms and will not forget us. We are loved so 
much that every drop of Jesus' blood was shed for us. With each drop 
falling from the cross you can hear with your spiritual ear, "I love you, I love 
you". The blood of Jesus is in heaven, not on mount Calvary, sprinkled on 
the mercy seat of the holy of holies for all our sins. The Lord knows each 
of our names, they are written in the Lamb's Book of Life. We are ever 
before the eyes of the Lord and safe in the hands of God. That's security!! 

12:05 Prayer, adjournment, lunch 

FRIDAY AFTERNOON PROCEEDINGS 
1:15 Song - "Nothing but the Blood". 

1:20 Devotion -George Berry -Romans 3:23. Sin caused three things to be lost, 
1. Favor of God. 2. Image of God. 3. Presence of God. 

1:30 Christian Education - Edith Gryder 

Jerry Wallace - speaker. "Any young people interested in going on to 
school should be encouraged to go to a Baptist school. There are 4 good 
reasons to choose Campbell: 1 . It is true to its purpose to educate people 



STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



15 



for Christian service. 2. Its location, rural area, a place where students can 
have all the services of home, safe and secure. Campbell was voted safest 
in N.C. and in the top 10 across the nation. 3. Programs - its heart is the 
same as when organized in 1897 - all things should meet the needs of 
mankind. 4. Wonderful product - people who want to and are willing to 
make a difference in the world. They join the ranks of people who will be 
the salt and light of the world. 

1:50 Baptist Foundation." Lloyd Culler - speaker. "Luke 16 is the story of a 
steward. A person to whose care has been committed the care of a 
household, can be applied to ministers and to Christians. We are always 
called to appear before the one to whom we are accountable. Christians are 
stewards. We have life, time, possessions, but all belong to God. We live 
on God's planet, using his possessions and will give an account of how we 
have managed for him. The NCBF established in 1920 as a means to 
perpetuate the work of N.C. Southern Baptist. They manage the assets of 
trusts set up with the money going to whatever organization designated by 
the person setting up the trust. The Baptist Foundation can also assist in 
writing will and will send someone to your church to help with this." 

2:10 Cooperative Program and Stewardship 

Speaker Ken Batts. "Four things about the Cooperative Program - 1. 
Biblical basis, God calls us to be stewards starting with Abraham in 
Genesis, called to be a light to the world. 2. Individual churches, no one has 
power over others. 3. What can I do? As a layperson you can teach, be 
trained, be an encourager of others, a witness and I can give. 4. We are 
laborers together. First we cooperate with God. We choose to work with 
others in our church as we do in our families. Working together we can 
spread the Good News all over the world, beginning at home. 

2:25 Vacation Bible School - Edwana Smith 

2:30 Woman's Missionary Union - Eunice Luttrell 

2:35 Finance Report - Edith Gryder, Treasurer. Copies of the proposed budget 
1991-1992 fiscal year were distributed. Will be voted on during business 
meeting the following day. 

2:40 Adjournment - Prayer 

SECOND DAY PROCEEDINGS 
August 10,1991, the second day of the Stony Fork Association annual 
meeting was held at Boone Fork. The following business and reports were 
conducted during the morning session. 
9:00 Call to order, moderator George Berry 
9:05 Song - "The Life Boat" 
9:10 Devotion - Eugene Fillers, Prayer 

9:15 Roll call - Bailey Camp 3, Boone Fork 6, Doe Ridge 4, Laytown 3, Long 
Ridge 4, Mt. Ephraim 1, Rock Spring 6, Sandy Flat 3 - total 30. 

9:20 Christian Action League - Sharon Craig 

Joe Lennon, Speaker. Psalms 9:17 - 33:12 Lost people are making 
decisions for N.C. in the General Assembly. "Blessed is the nation whose 



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STOMY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



God is the Lord". One thing we are fighting is the lottery. The thing that is 
wrong with the lottery is that it is sin. Christians must stand against it. Man 
doesn't have the solutions, but God does. More money and more studies 
are not the answer. We need to cure the cause, which is sin. There were 
37,000 abortions in N.C. in 1988. Also, the Christian Action League is 
trying to get the blood alcohol level dropped from .10 to 0.8. One drink 
impairs the ability to drive. N.C. has one of the best anti-pornography laws. 
If you know of a violation, contact your local district attorney and try to get 
him to prosecute. If you need a copy of this law, contact us and we will send 
it. 

9:50 Foreign Missions - Scott Church 

10:05 Discipleship Training - Charles Craig 

Preschool and Children literature will be changing, Sunday School and DT 
literature will separate. There will be improvements in other levels. On 
Sept. 6-7, the assoc. team went to Ridgecrest for training. If you would like 
to start DT, let us know and we will help. Your first literature order is free 
if less than $100.00. "M" night will be Oct. 20, speaker Maurice Cooper 
from the SBC and he would like to speak to all the churches. Where there 
is no vision, people perish. Pray that we will open our eyes to the fact that 
Jesus is the head of the church. We cannot function without the Holy Spirit. 

10:20 Break 

10:30 ANNUAL MESSAGE - Eugene Fillers 

Matt. 7:13-23 - Evidence of Salvation. Not everyone that says they are a 
child of God is a child of God. There is an outward evidence and change. 
You can tell a child of the King when you see them. There will be a changed 
. life, you are no longer the same. What are you going to lay down at his feet 
when you get to Heaven? Don't let things come up to stop us from 
worshipping God. Most of the time it is our physical needs. God will prosper 
whatever we do. We need a burden for the lost people, our own families, 
we need to talk to them. We have a problem of not hearing what God says. 
We want to change it to what we want to hear. God says "my sheep know 
me and hear my voice". When you serve God, things will begin to happen, 
trials will come but growth comes in the valley. We have a choice to make, 
serve God or serve the devil. No man can serve two masters. If we love the 
Lord, we hate evil and all ungodly things. He that hath the Son hath life. 

1 1:30 Director of Missions - Burl Jones 

Acts 1 :8 - "Ye shall receive power shall be my witness". That is what we are 
about in Stony Fork Assoc. All our needs are pretty much the same in the 
churches and God is showing me some of these needs. I need your prayers. 
I believe God will bless us and I thank God for your, my family. I'm available 
and want to be used by God to be your servant. 

1 1:35 General Board Report - Roy Gryder 

We met three times this past year. There were no headline making 
decisions. Mandate - a periodic videotape for subscribers that gives a 
breakdown of mission activity, 1/2 hours long, 3 segments hosted by a 



STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



17 



young couple, has been a tremendous success. They will soon go to a 1 
hour tape and available every 2 months. These are a wonderful tool for 
WMG and other mission groups. 1 1 :40 Stewardship - Roy Qryder 
Since 1988 when I have kept statistics, money coming in has not 
increased, but money spent on missions has almost doubled. We have 
established a growing working WMU, sent men to the mission field in Brazil 
and activities in other areas are increasing. We are a functional, running 
organization. Go back and tell your churches what we are doing. 

11:45 Resolutions - Betty Woods 

11:48 Obituaries -Clerk 

11:50 Election of officers - Nominating Committee nominated the following 
officers for the coming year: 

Director of Missions: Burl Jones Home Missions: Wanda Winkler 

Moderator: George Berry Children's Homes: Jeri Triplett 

Treasurer: Edith Gryder Baptist Hospital: Linda Church 

Clerk: Linda Mills Christian Education: Edith Qryder 

VBS: Barbara West Retirement Homes: Mamie Craig 

Discipleship Training: Charles Craig Foreign Missions: Scott Church 

Stewardship: Roy Gryder Christian Action League: Sharon Craig 

Sunday School: Danny Crowder Brotherhood: Dennis Oaks 

Evangelism: George Berry Biblical Recorder: Lloyd Buckner 

Song Leader: Pauline Eldreth Obituaries: Clerk 

Cooperative Program: Pauline Berry Resolutions: Betty Woods 

Vice Moderator, State Missions, Baptist Foundation, Piano Player will be 
elected at first Executive Committee Meeting. 

Program Committee: Edith Gryder, George Berry, Linda Mills, Burl Jones 
Finance Committee: Edith Gryder, Dale Luttrell, Linda Mills, Roy Gryder, 
Burl Jones 

Missions Committee: Pastors of each church. Director of Missions 
Nominating Committee: Pastors of each church. Director of Missions. 
Moved to elect the officers as presented by the Nominating Committee, 
seconded and approved. 

Moved to elect remaining officers at first Executive Committee meeting in 
Sept. by Roy Gryder, seconded by Charles Craig and approved. 
Welcomed new pastors Eugene Fillers and Arvil Hardy, not present 
yesterday. 

New Business: Moved to adopt budget with addition of $150.00 for WMG 
travel expenses as presented by the Finance Committee by Scott Church, 
seconded by Carroll Woods. Aproved. 
12:05 Adjourment — Prayer — Lunch 



18 



STOrSY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



REPORTS 

KOME MISSIONS 

From all indications, Southern Baptists are increasing their emphasis on 
evangelism. I am pleased to announce that Southern Baptists baptized 385,031 
this year, an increase of 9.7% over last year. We are progressing steadily toward 
our goal of baptizing 500,000 per year by the end of this century. 

At the end of the year. Southern Baptists reported 43,4 1 9 new congregations. 
Today nearly half the churches we start are tailored to meet the needs of ethnic 
people or blacks. Each Sunday Southern Baptists worship in more than 103 
languages and dialects, and that number grows annually. 

The Home Mission Board appointed 475 missionaries, bringing the total to 
4,573. Since 1980, the categories of "Mission Pastor" and "Field Personnel 
Assistance" have expanded. In 1990, more than half the missions personnel of 
4,573 were in these two categories. 

Already these home missionary/church planters are responsible for the 
majority of the approximately 1 ,200 missions started by Southern Baptist each 
year. 

We need to support and pray for these people, so pray every day for Home 
Missions. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Vera Dula 



September - October, 1991 



Christian Action 

League 
$30,006 (1.667%) 



Caswell Debt J 
Retirement ' 7 
$108,000 (6%) / 



Caswell CaplUI 

Funds 
$252,000 (14%) 



Associatlonal Projects 
$171,000 (9.5%) 



Christian Higher 

Education 
$198,000 (11%) 



Fruitiand Baptist 

Bible Institute 
$23,994 (1.333%) 



Mission Ministries 
$702,000 (39%) 




Woman's Missionary Union 
(Heci< -Jones) 
$180,000 (10%) 

1991 STATE MISSIONS OFFERING 
Disbursement of Funds 
Base Goal: $1,800,000 



Morth Carolina Baptist Men 
$135,000 (7.5%) 



STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



19 



THE BIBLICAL RECORDER 
Associational Report — 1991 

The Baptist world is changing rapidly; some would contend it is for good while 
others think it is nothing short of a tragedy. 

Whatever one's view may be, there is an indispensable need for correct and 
reliable information. The Biblical Recorder was born and continues to serve for 
that purpose. 

People are reading less than any time in recent history. It is true of secular 
publications, it is true of wholesome books from respected libraries, it is true of 
religious publications. We live in an electronic, fast-food, everything is disposable 
age! We often think we know the answers only to discover later we do not. 

An informed Baptist is a better Baptist; an uninformed Baptist may be an 
uninvolved or disruptive Baptist. No democracy, including our local churches and 
the denomination they comprise, can survive long without an informed, involved 
constituency which makes corporate decisions based upon accurate information 
from reliable sources. 

The most important thing facing us at this point is to get the Recorder into 
more Baptist homes than ever before. Your support as a subscriber and reader and 
your encouragement to others will enable the paper to better serve the constitu- 
ency with accurate and helpful information delivered to Baptist homes and 
churches. We need your help! 

in order to save churches large amounts of money and to increase the 
readership of the Recorder, Church News Service (CNS) was launched in 1990. 
This system lets any congregation have their church newsletter incorporated into 
the 6/t)/(ca/ Recorder which saves staff time, postage and printing costs. Usually, 
for less than what it costs to produce the church newsletter, CNS gives the entire 
Baptist communication package to each family in the congregation. We are 
steadily adding churches to the CNS program. 

The paper focuses more and more attention on North Carolina Baptists with 
news, features and inspirational articles which will encourage individuals and 
churches in their witness and ministry. 

Never has God given Baptists a greater opportunity; never have there been 
as many difficulties and obstacles to overcome. One sure way to conquer 
problems and overcome the barriers to effective witness and ministry is to have 
the facts, know the issues and be adequately informed. 

That is why the Recorder was born; that is why it serves today. For more 
information on how your church can subscribe or use CNS, contact: 

The Biblical Recorder 
232 WestMillbrook Road 
Raleigh, NC 27609 
(919)847-2127 



Respectfully submitted, 
Lloyd Buckner 



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STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



BAPTIST CHILDREN'S HOMES OF NORTH CAROLINA, INC. 

I just received a call through our switchboard here at Baptist Children's 
Homes of North Carolina in Thomasville. The operator was Lynn, a girl who grew 
up at Mills Home. She is working the switchboard this summer and kept her job 
working the 3-1 1 p.m. shift at a local nursing home. This fall, she will enroll as a 
freshman at Wingate College, one of our fine Baptist schools. 

Lots of young people will be enrolling at Wingate this year. Lots of others will 
enroll at colleges all over the state. But not many of their enrollments mark a 
victory over adversity like Lynn's does. 

Lynn, 19, came to Mills Home in 1981 with two sisters. Her mother's ill health 
prevented her from caring for her children. Lynn has never seen her father. In 
college Lynn plans to study human services, then be a social worker at a children's 
home ... maybe even this one. Generous benefactors have provided funds so 
Baptist Children's Homes can help Lynn attend Wingate. 

1 asked Lynn what she would do if BCH hadn't been able to help her go to 
school. She said, "I'd have found a way, somehow." Such spirit demonstrates a 
will to overcome that both reflects Baptist Children's Homes and defines us. 

BCH has been overcoming and helping hurting children overcome for 106 
years. This year is especially significant because it marks the return of an annual 
Thanksgiving Offering for Baptist Children's Homes, after a 1 3-year absence. We 
plan to raise $500,000 this year through the offering. Would you help promote this 
offering in your church? An information packet will come to your church in 
September. 

As significant to our health as is theThanksgiving Offering, a more consistent 
source of help is churches putting Baptist Children's Homes in their budgets. As 
finance chairman for your church, you could be instrumental in showing your 
members the benefits of including the ministry of Baptist Children's Homes in the 
budget as you discuss your missions giving in the coming months. 

Here's some things you may not know about us. Baptist Children 's Homes 
of North. Carolina serves more than 1,000 children each year through 
facilities in 13 locations across North Carolina. We have residential campuses 
in Thomasville, Kinston, Pembroke and Clyde; emergency care homes on those 
campuses and in Dallas; homes for behaviorally troubled girls in Franklin and 
Lenoir; therapeutic camping in Moore County; a maternity home in Asheville; a 
home for teen-age mothers and their babies in Lenoir, a model child development 
center in Thomasville, the Philpott Parent Aide program in Davidson County, 
foster homes and recreational, retreat facilities. 

About 35 percent of our budget comes from churches through the Coopera- 
tive Program and special offerings. As recently as 30 years ago, we were nearly 
100 percent financed by North Carolina Southern Baptist churches. Our goal is 
to increase church support to 50 percent of our budget. 

If your church puts Baptist Children's Homes in its budget, several good 
things will begin to happen; 

Your people will be more aware of their ministry to hurting children and 
broken families through Baptist Children's Homes; 



STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



21 



^ Consequently, they will be encouraged that yes, someone is doing 
something about the crying needs around them; 

^ Your consistent gifts to BCH will enable us to plan more faithfully to meet 
needs; 

✓ A small monthly commitment will result in a large annual gift to the needs 
of children and families in our state. 

We welcome the opportunity to have a staff member personally share with 
your church about this ministry. Several churches already have BCH in their 
budgets. If yours is one, you already know how significant to Kingdom work your 
gifts are. Thank you very much. 

If BCH is not in your budget, please consider adding a line item, it might read: 
"To give a child a chance!" 

Best regards, 

Michael C. Blackwell, President 

BCH GIVES CHILDREN A CHANCE! 

For an institution that's 106 years old. Baptist Children's Homes of North 
Carolina (BCH) looks strongly to the future! Three pillars that uphold that futuristic 
foundation are: 1. The return of the Thanksgiving Offering beginning in 
November 1991; 2. The success of our "Give a child a chancel" financial 
campaign, and 3. Baptists' continued support of BCH through the 
Cooperative Program. 

This financial undergirding made it possible for BCH to serve more than 1,200 
children and families last year through facilties at 13 locations across the state. 
Because Baptists cared enough to give, residents like Lynn will go to Wingate 
College this fall; Chris graduated from GNC-Chapel Hill; Jennifer is in her second 
year at Haywood Community College and Mark earned a football scholarship to 
North Carolina A&T. Each of these lives proceeds on firm footing because Baptist 
Children's Homes was there and paved their pathway. 

Most BCH residents come from dysfunctional families where a single parent, 
most often a mother, simply is unable to care for her children. Her frustration with 
life leads to limitless freedom for the children, which leads to troubling behavior. 
Physical abuse, divorce, alcohol, drugs and truancy mark their young lives. 

Baptist Children's Homes provides a safe environment where children learn 
to name their problems and address them to change behavior. At the same time, 
willing family members also are addressing their problems with the help of BCH 
social workers In many cases, children and families are restored. BDH's "Give a 
child a chance!"campaign is raising $11 million over three years to expand 
Cameron Boys Camp, boost general operating income and increase endowment. 
Gifts and pledges through July totaled $9.3 million and response across the state 
has been overwhelming and heart gratifying. 

Last year Baptist Men of North Carolina helped construct the new Tommy 
and Jeanie Eller Chuckwagon at Cameron Boys Camp that was dedicated May 
19. 

BCH celebrated this spring the 20th anniversary of the founding of Broyhill 



22 



STONY FORK BAFn"IST ASSOCIATION 



Home, our western-most campus, in Waynesville/Clyde. With the help of J.E. 
Broyhill and his family, the home was opened in 1971 on 91 hilly acres. It has 
capacity for 48 children in group care and for eight girls in emergency care. . 

In August 1990 BCH began the Gregg Children's Center for before and after 
school care. The Davidson County program offers security to children of working 
couples, who now don't have to go home to empty houses. 

Children's hopes the world over have been bolstered by the 1991 return of 
the Thanksgiving Offering voted by messengers to the 1989 state convention. 
While suffering through its 13-year absence, BCH lost more than $2 million in 
potential gifts Our goal this year Is $500,000. Because of a partnership established 
in December with the Baptist Children's Homes of Sao Paulo, Brazil, BCH-North 
Carolina will donate 10 percent of everything it receives over the $500,000 goal 
for work in that desperately needy land. 

In August 1 990, BCH signed an agreement with Gaston County Department 
of Social Services to operate two emergency care homes owned by the county. 
That raises to seven the number of emergency care homes BCH operates. 
Emergency care, in which a child at risk of abuse or neglect can receive shelter 
right away, is the service most in demand throughout the state. Children stay a 
maximum of 60 days while BCH works with the custodian to determine a long- 
term plan of care. 

The Cooperative Program continues to anchor our budget planning from 
the churches. We urge renewed commitment to cooperative giving among our 
North Carolina churches. It is essential, not only for us, but for the entire missions 
enterprise built painstakingly for a century and a half. Baptist Children's Homes 
receives $1.5 million from Cooperative Program receipts each year. This is the 
stackpole around which we build our other income planning. A decrease in 
Cooperative Program dollars to Baptist Children's Homes would seriously jeop- 
ardize our ability to care for children. 

Baptist Children's Homes has a 106-year history. But its history is just the 
knot that ties it to a boundless, unbroken ribbon of promise that stretches beyond 
the future to wrap children and families with eternal blessings. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Jeri Triplett 

BAPTIST RETIREMENT HOMES OF NORTH CAROLINA, INC. 
1991: MAKING LIFE FOR OLDER ADULTS 
THE BEST OF TIMES 

The Baptist Retirement Homes of North Carolina, Inc. operates four residen- 
tial facilities for Older Adults around the State — the Albemarle Baptist Home in 
the Southern Piedmont, the Western North Carolina Baptist Home in Asheville, the 
Hamilton Baptist Home in Eastern North Carolina, and the Brookridge Retirement 
Community in Winston-Salem. 

In Asheville, 1 99 1 began with a great deal of excitement. After more than five 
years of trying to receive state approval to build a nursing care bed addition, the 
Baptist Retirement Homes was awarded a Certificate of Need for 100 medicaid 



STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



23 



certified nursing care beds for its Western North Carolina Baptist Home on 
Richmond Hill in Northwest Asheville. Currently the only nursing care provided by 
the Baptist Retirement Homes is the 85 bed nursing care unit at the Brookridge 
Retirement Community in Winston-Salem. The addition of 1 00 medicaid certified 
beds will mean that quality nursing care can be offered to Western North Carolina 
Baptists regardless of their ability to pay for the institutional services that they 
need. 

The 39,000 square foot addition will cost approximately $2.8 million. At the 
present time, the Baptist Retirement Homes has raised approximately $2 million 
of the $2.8 million needed to make this long hoped for dream a reality. Baptists 
across Western North Carolina are being urged to help Baptist Retirement Homes 
meet the financial challenge of building this new unit on Richmond Hill. 

In Winston-Salem, the Brookridge Retirement Community completed its 
second year of operation. Under the leadership of a well-trained and committed 
Christian staff, the Brookridge Retirement Community's Independent Living area 
and Health Care Unit are considered among the finest in the State. 

In Albemarle and Hamilton, Assisted Living care is provided to older Adults 
in residential settings. The Albemarle and Hamilton facilities offer quality care to 
Older Adults regardless of their ability to pay for the cost of the care they receive 
... a service unmatched by any other church related long-term care institution in 
this state. 

Please support our ministry with your prayers and financial resources. Help 
us make life for Baptist Older Adults . . . The Best of Times! 

Respectfully submitted, 
Mamie Craig 

Report to Baptist Associations 
North Carolina Baptist Hospital 
1991 

The year 1 99 1 is significant in the history of Baptist Hospital — it marks the 
50th anniversary of its entering a partnership with the Bowman Gray School of 
Medicine of Wake Forest University, to form one of the 126 academic medical 
centers in the nation. Appropriate events have been planned to celebrate this 
anniversary. 

This partnership makes it possible for Baptist Hospital to offer it's patients the 
most advanced technology for diagosing and treating their health problems. For 
example, ours is one of 15 medical centers in the nation involved in clinical trials 
of a new coronary laser which vaporizes plaque in blocked coronary arteries. We 
are one of five centers in the U.S. conducting clinical trials in stereotactic 
radiosurgery, a procedure in which high-energy beams of radiation from a linear 
accelerator are focused by computers on brain tumors and lesions to destroy 
them. This procedure can be done on an outpatient basis. We are one of 24 
Comprehensive Cancer Centers in the nation. We are the designated organ 
procurement agency for northwest North Carolina, and we recently received 
approval to begin performing pancreatic transplants this year. Early in 1992, we 
expect to open our new Center for Positron Emission Tomography, one of the 



24 



STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



most advanced radiological services which is capable of measuring the chemical 
structure of the body. This new diagnostic procedure promises to make possible 
earlier detection, and hence, eadier treatment of tumors, hopefully, improving the 
outcome of the treatment. 

During the past year, the hospital admitted approximately 22,000 patients, 
and almost 400,000 persons were treated through the various outpatient services 
of the Medical Center. These patients came from most counties in North Carolina, 
from 32 other states, and from several other countries. 

During the past year. Baptist Hospital was re-accredited by the Joint 
Commission on Accreditation of Health Care Organizations, and the survey team 
which visited our institution ranked it in the top 10 percent of hospitals in the 
nation. Also, according to a recent report from the North Carolina Medical 
Database Commission, average charges for care at Baptist Hospital are 10 
percent below the average charges for similar diagnoses in hospitals statewide, 
and substantially lower than charges in the other North Carolina academic 
medical centers. 

The Pastoral Care Department, which is funded in part through the Coopera- 
tive Program, provided Clinical Pastoral Education to 42 students during the past 
year. The Pastoral Care staff provided more than 54,000 specific ministries to 
hospital patients, family members, and staff. And, the counseling division 
provided over 21,700 counseling sessions. The Professional staff of the Pastoral 
Care Department continues to respond to requests for help from churches in 
conflict, from pastors and their families across the state. 

For the first time since 1978, a Mother's Day Offering exclusively for Baptist 
Hospital Benevolent Care was received in North Carolina Baptist Churches. At the 
time this report is being written, results of the Mother's Day Offering appear to be 
very favorable. The staff and patients at Baptist Hospital are profoundly grateful 
to North Carolina Baptists for this support. 

Betty C. Gilreath, Chair of Trustees 
Len B. Preslar, Jr., President 
Respectfully submitted, 
Linda Church 

BAPTIST COLLEGE REPORT 
1991 

A "new-old" event is about to take place in North Carolina Baptist life: A 
Special Committee! From time to time we Baptists feel the need to take a hard look 
at ourselves. We do that through the time-Honored practice of asking trusted 
people to serve on a committee for a year, sometimes two. In 1956, for example, 
"The Committee of Twenty-Five" began a comprehensive study which eventually 
embraced all aspects of North Carolina Baptist life. That committee reported to 
a special session of the Baptist State Convention called for that purpose on May 
5-6, 1 959. Again, "The Committee of Twenty," appointed in 1967, worked for two 
years before presenting its comprehensive findings and recommendations to the 
Convention in November of 1969. Both of these committees provided clarity and 
guidance for North Carolina Baptists which endured for many years. 



STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



25 



New times call for a fresh look at ourselves. Tfie "new times" which have 
taken shape in the Southern Baptist Convention since 1979 have particular 
relevance for institutions, agencies, their trustees and the Convention. North 
Carolina Baptist institutions and agencies have rendered distinguished Christian 
service for a total of 1,108 years! New times call for a new look by a competent 
special committee. 

In May the General Board approved a 17-member "Institutions Relations 
Committee." Lamar Brooks, Wilmington, is chairman. Other members are: Jean 
P. Abernethy, Marion; Dot Allred, Gastonia; Curtis Lee Barbery, Bennett; Harold 
Bennett, Boone; Don Bolden, Burlington; Caralie Brown, Raleigh; Kathryn H. 
Hamrick, Shelby; John H. Hewett, Asheville; Milton A. Hollifield, Jr., Stanley; John 
M. Hough, Jr., Salisbury; James H. Johnson, Candler; Robert B. Poole, Elizabeth 
City; George W. Pullium, Jr., Knightdale; Hobart Smith, Charlotte; A. Eugene 
Warren, Charlotte; J. L. Wilson, Winston-Salem. Their report is due in November, 
1992. 

The "new-old" way of study and thought is the North Carolina Baptist, tried- 
and-true way to confront changing times. We thank these 17 good men and 
women who will help us to shape the future together in harmony. They request 
and deserve our fervent prayers. 



NORTH CAROLINA BAPTIST INSTITUTIONS/AGENCIES 

Gardner-Webb — Wingate — Meredith — Campbell — Mars Hill — Chowan — Wake Forest 

1905 1 896 1 891 1887 1856 1 848 1 834 

Retirement Homes — Hospital — Foundation — Children's Homes — Biblical Recorder 
1950 1923 1919 1885 1833 



Respectfully submitted, 
Edith Gryder 

NORTH CAROLINA BAPTIST FOONDATTON, INC. 
ANNUAL REPORT TO BAPTIST ASSOCIATIONS 
OF NORTH CAROLINA 
JUNE 1991 

The Board of Directors and the staff of the North Carolina Baptist Foundation 
are committed to effective leadership in generating increased perpetual financial 
support of Baptist causes throughout the state, nation and world. With assets 
approximately $27 million (market value) at the end of the 1 990 fiscal year, the 
income distribution to Baptist causes is significant each year. 

Typically, assets are either held as endowments paying interest income in 
perpetuity to named Baptist causes, or they are held in trust with current income 
being paid to individuals and future income being paid to Baptist causes in 
perpetuity. 

Earned income distributed to Baptist institutions and mission causes during 



26 



STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



fiscal year of 1 990: $647, 1 80 

Earned income distributed to individuals with Baptist causes named as 
charitable remainderman during fiscal year of 1990: $686,124 

The staff of the Foundation consists of seven full time employees and two 
persons who provide part-time service in accounting and legal services. The 
servicing of individual accounts requires continuous contact with trustors, donors 
and those designating gifts through Wills. The increased number of requests for 
assistance in seminars and conferences by churches, associations and individuals 
has made part-time assistance necessary in regions of the state some distance 
from the office. 

There are continual improvements being made in available charitable estate 
planning computer software, constant changes in state and federal regulations 
which affect charitable estate planning and an increased need for technical 
training and assistance to serve the ever increasing needs of both the develop- 
ment staffs of our institutions and the individuals utilizing the Foundation services. 
The Foundation continues to provide for these needs to maximize the growth in 
financial support for Baptist causes. 

In 1990, the Foundation moved into a new home. The 6,000 square foot 
office building was constructed from gifts from individuals and is located on 
property provided by the Baptist State Convention next to the Baptist Building in 
Cary. The new facility was occupied in February 1 990 and provides much needed 
space forthe work of staff as well as for conferences and meetings. Baptist groups 
are invitedto use the meeting rooms when in the Raleigh/Cary area. We extend 
an invitation to church groups to call and arrange a visit to the newest building 
used for the Lord's service by North Carolina Baptists. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Edwin S. Coates, Executive Director 

Dale Luttrell 

COOPERATIVE PROGRAM 

Cooperation has been our reason to exist as a denomination for about 160 
years. 

During this time, we may not have fully agreed on how to carry out every 
phase of our work, but we have always agreed to cooperate together to upbuild 
the Kingdom of God. 

Cooperation is what has always held us together as Southern Baptist. Without 
cooperation we can do nothing but with it we can do anything for the glory of God 
and his Kingdom. 

Although our churches are small and few in number, we, as Southern Baptist, 
can continue to give through the Cooperative Program to see that the work of our 
Lord is done. 

Cooperation is the key word in our work as an association. Our task of 
reaching a lost world for Jesus depends on the faithfulness of our people to press 
toward our goal. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Pauline Berry 



STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



27 



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28 



STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



COOPERATIVE PROGRAM RECEIPTS 
AND SPECIAL OFFERINGS 

Gifts through the Cooperative Program actually received by Business Office 
of the Baptist State Convention for the period listed below. Check this with your 
church records and please report any difference to O. D. Martin, Jr., P.O. Box 
1107, Cary, NC 27512. 

Special Offerings from the churches for Baptist causes shown as designated. 



January 1 through June 30, 1991 





COOPERATIVE PROGRAM 


DESIGMATED 


CHGRCHES 


CGRRErHT 


TOTAL TO 


TO DATE 


CORRENT 


TO DATE 


MAME 


QUARTER 


DATE ABOVE 


I^ST YEAR 


QUARTER 


ABOVE 


Baileys Camp 


.00 


.00 


.00 


.00 


.00 


Boone Fork 


.00 


.00 


100.00 


385.70 


510.70 


Doe Ridge 


43.00 


119.65 


151.05 


.00 


.00 


Laytown 


.00 


.00 


600.00 


100.00 


300.00 


Mount Ephriam 


108.00 


302.00 


784.87 


.00 


.00 


Mount Paron 


.00 


.00 


.00 


.00 


.00 


Mount View 


.00 


.00 


.00 


.00 


.00 


Mew Hopewell 


.00 


.00 


.00 


.00 


.00 


Rock Spring 


1.031.89 


1,996.97 


1,712.97 


951.33 


2,424.48 


Rock View 


.00 


.00 


.00 


.00 


.00 


Sandy Flat 


39.92 


76.41 


48.16 


1,836.79 


2,750.70 


Other Than Church 


.00 


.00 


.00 


.00 


.00 


TOTAL 


1,444.31 


3,438.40 


3,913.96 


3,912.82 


6,731.73 



VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL 

On Friday, March 8, 1 99 1 , Donna Triplett, Barbara West, Edith Gryder, Burl 
Jones and myself, Edwana Smith, attended the N.C. VBS workshop which was 
held at Western Ave. Church in Statesville, N.C. Many things were learned which 
helped us to prepare for our associational VBS work shop. 

The Stony, Fork Associational VBS workshop was held on Sunday, May 
19,1991 at Bailey's Camp Baptist Church. The meeting began at 6:00 p.m. and 
closed at 8:00 p.m. There were 7 of the 12 churches that make up the Stony Fork 
Assoc. represented at the meeting. The churches that attended were Bailey's 
Camp, Boone Fork, Laytown, Long Ridge, Mt. Ephraim, Rock Spring and Sandy 
Flat. There was a total attendance of 26 workers and 2 pastors present. Six of the 
seven churches have completed their Bible Schools with some very good reports. 
Mt. Ephraim will hold their Bible School later this summer. 

We are very thankful to the Lord that they will be having a VBS at Mt. Ephraim 
this year. Let us all pray that the Lord will richly bless them in their work. 

I would like to say thank you to everyone who has helped with VBS this year. 
Many seeds have been sown to which one day the Lord will reap His harvest. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Edwana Smith 



STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



29 



VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL STATISTICS 





D6tc of 






Pro 


/ \cl LCI la lo 


fl f f o r i n /I i f\ 
v^l 1 CI II ly lU 


Church 


VBS 


Enrollment 


Attn. 


of faith 


cost 


Coorp. Program 


Bailey's Camp 


6-3-91 


40 


30 





225.00 





Long Ridge 


6-3-91 


49 


49 







51.00 


Rock Spring 


6-16-91 


70 


58 





292.00 


62.00 


Sandy Flat 


6-17-91 


40 


30 





125.00 


153.00 


Boone Fork 


7-7-91 


22 


21 





130.00 


48.00 


Laytown 


7-26-91 


21 


20 





121.00 


111.00 


Mt. Ephraim 














Total to Date 




242 


208 





893.00 


425.00 



TREASURER REPORT 



Ending balance 7-31-90 $1162.84 

Less outstanding checks -350.00 

Balance in bank 812.84 

Paid by churches for minutes 312.00 

Paid by churches for George Berry Brazil trip 1924.93 

Total contributions 8293.81 

Plus previous balance 812.84 

Total $9106.65 

Expenses 

Director of Missions — Travel $3250.00 

Annuity — Director of Missions 572.00 

Honorarium for Clerk 250.00 

Honorarium for Treasurer 250.00 

V.B.S. Materials and Gas 138.26 

Evangelism (Neil Hatfield — Prayer Retreat) 50.00 

Sunday School/Discipleship Training 150.00 

Clerical (stamps) 10.00 

Telephone 6.33 

George Berry Brazil Trip 1615.00 

Minutes 483.00 

Total expenditures $6774.59 

Balance in account 7-31-91 $2332.06 



30 



STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



PROPOSED BUDGET FOR STONY FORK ASSOCIATION 

1991-1992 

Total income for 1991 through July, 31st — $6074.00 and this same amount 
expected for 1992 fisical year. 



Director of Mission travel expenses 3000.00 

Annuity — Director of Missions 624.00 

Clerical - Misc 50.00 

Clerk Honoraium 250.00 

Treasurer Honorarium 250.00 

Vacation Bible School 200.00 

Phone 50.00 

Sunday School 200.00 

Discipleship Training 100.00 

Evangelism 100.00 

WMU Travel 150.00 

Total 4974.00 



ANNUAL REPORT 
CHRISTIAN ACTION LEAGUE OF NORTH CAROLINA, INC. 

This has been a most eventful year for the cause of Applied Christianity. 

With North Carolina facing a 1.1 billion dollar shortfall and with news 
accounts stating that citizens from North Carolina are spending 1 00 million dollars 
annually in the Virginia lottery, it appeared almost inevitable that a lottery bill 
would pass the 1991 legislative session. 

In addition to the economic factors, the gambling industry had 13 lobbyists 
working the halls of the Legislature daily promoting lottery legislation. 

Even though lottery legislation passed the Senate, it was quite evident that 
the lottery lobbyists could not line up enough votes to get the measure through 
the House of Representatives. Lottery supporters did not push for a vote, for they 
knew that the legislation would be dead. Therefore, the proposal will be eligible to 
be considered in the next legislative session when it convenes in June, 1992. 

Between now and then, it is of utmost importance that you secure a 
commitment from your representatives in the North Carolina House to oppose 
state-sponsored gambling. The Senate will not be voting on the lottery in 1992 
because it has already passed that body. 

Key lottery supporters were Senator Ken Royall (D-Durham), Senator 
George Daniels (D-Caswell), Representative David Redwine (D-Brunswick), Rep- 
resentative Joe Mavretic (D-Edgecombe), Representative Robert Hunter (D- 
McDowell) and Representative Frank Rhodes (R-Forsyth). 

Opponents of the legislation were led by Governor Jim Martin, Lieutenant 
Governor Jim Gardner, Senate President Pro-Tem Henson Barnes (D-Wayne), 
and Speaker of the House Dan Blue (D-Wake). 

While we were successful in side-tracking lottery legislation, the Legislature 
refused to enact the following proposals: 



STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



31 



1. PARENTAL CONSENT ... North Carolina remains one of the few states in 
the nation that allows a minor to receive an abortion without parental consent. 
Legislation to enact parental consent passed the House, but died in the Senate. 

2. DRUNK DRIVING ... The House passed legislation that would change the 
alcohol blood level from .1 to .08 as the breathalyzer standard for Driving-While- 
Impaired. The Senate refused to act on this proposal. 

3. OPEN CONTAINERS OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES IN MOTOR VE- 
HICLES ... It is ironic that an open liquor bottle is prohibited in a motor vehicle, 
yet there is no limit to the number of open beer containers allowed in a motor 
vehicle. Highway safety authorities confirm that a large majority of the drivers 
charged with driving-while-impaired are beer drinkers. H.C. Highway Patrol 
officials endorsed the open container legislation, but it got "hung up" in a House 
committee. 

4. TEEN-AGE PREGNANCIES ... In order to address this growing problem, 
legislation was introduced to require sexual abstinence instruction to be a part of 
the curriculum of our public schools. (Such instruction has been very successful 
in reducing teen-age pregnancies in other areas of our country.) However, such 
a program was opposed by our N.C. Department of Public Instruction. Education 
officials charged that such legislation would be imposing a standard of morality 
upon our youth. The measure simply stated: "The State Board of Education shall 
adopt rules to provide that the public school curriculum shall include instruction, 
in appropriate grades and classes, that abstinence from sexual activity outside of 
marriage is the expected standard for all school-age children, that abstinence from 
sexual activity is the only certain means of avoiding out-of-wedlock pregnancy, 
sexually transmitted diseases, including AIDS, and other associated health 
problems; and that a mutually faithful monogamous relationship in the context 
of marriage is the best lifelong means of avoiding sexually transmitted diseases, 
including AIDS." 

5. ABORTION FUND ... North Carolina is the only Southeastern state that 
used state tax funds for medically unnecessary abortions. Some $400,000 of state 
tax funds have been budgeted by the state lelgislature to pay for these elective 
abortions. Therefore, we are denying thousands of babies right here in North 
Carolina their constitutional right of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. 

How can we turn the tide on these important moral issues? It will occur when 
North Carolina Baptists and other Christians are willing to become actively and 
publicly involved in upholdling our Judeo-Christian moral standards. It is not 
enough to wring our hands and just talk about problems. We need to cry out 
publicly and act against sin. Baptists need to be informed about the stands taken 
on these issues by those who are running for public office, and then vote for those 
who reflect our standards. 

In addition to a demanding legislative session, the Christian Action League 
has successfully assisted several counties and municipalities in liquor, beer, and 
wine referendums. 

Good Government Seminars were conducted in the Ashevillle and Wilmington 
areas, at which some of the above issues were addressed. 



32 



STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



Nationally recognized authorities came to share their expertise on the issues 
of gambling and family matters. These included Dr. Paul Cameron, Chairman of 
the Family Research Institute, Washington, D.C.; Austin McQuigan, former State's 
Attorney for Connecticut, and Bill Swindell, National Field Director, American 
Family Association, Tupelo, Mississippi. 

We praise God for your prayer and financial support as we join in addressing 
the moral and ethical issues facing our society. 

Joe S. Lennon, President 
Coy C. Privette, Executive Director 
Respectfully submitted, 
Sharon Craig 

FOREIGN MISSIONS 
FOREIGN MISSION BOARD 

The final report on the 1990 Lottie Moon Christmas Offering for foreign 
missions carried both good news and bad news. 

Positive: The total received, $79,358,610.87, was the second-largest amount 
ever given through the offering since it began in 1888. 

Negative: For the first time in 53 years, the offering total was less than for the 
preceding year. And the total fell far short of the $86 million goal. 

As a result of the shortfall the executive board of Woman's Missionary Union, 
auxiliary to the Southern Baptist Convention, reduced the goal for the 1991 
offering to $84 million (it had been set at $88 million). The WMCJ board set the 
1992 offering goal at $88 million. 

Not meeting the 1990 goal could immediately affect plans to fund capital 
needs for new construction, equipment and vehicles as the missions enterprise 
expands. Foreign Mission Board President R. Keith Parks said, however, that 
Southern Baptists will not retrench in efforts to expand world missions. 

If the offering had reached its goal, it would have provided 47.06 percent of 
the board's $182.7-million budget in 1991. The denomination's Cooperative 
Program unified budget is scheduled to provide 37.95 percent or $69.3 million. 

The Lottie Moon offering, generally collected by Southern Baptist congrega- 
tions during December, is believed to be the largest single offering of its kind 
among Christians. 

The foreign Mission Board last fall increased its annual budget by 4.5 percent 
over 1990, action based largely on the Lottie Moon $86 million goal, a 7 percent 
rise from the year before. "We're not retrenching," Parks said. "We will trust in the 
Lord. ..and move ahead with faith and optimism." Fortunately, many overseas 
Baptist groups with which missionaries work are maturing and bearing increased 
financial responsibility in their nations, he added. 

"But we must make a note of realism," he said. "We truly regret that at this 
time our resources are not keeping up with the appointment of new missionaries 
and the opening of new opportunities." 

The Southern Baptist Foreign Mission Board appointed 43 missionaries at its 
June meeting in Richmond, Va. 



STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



33 



Approval of the 43 missionaries, including 37 new appointments and six 
reappointments, bring the board's total missions force to 3,920 in 121 countries, 
with work extending into several other nations. 

12 TO REACH ONE 

"I gave away 12 Bibles in order to get one in the hands of one lady," says 
missionary Jean Morgan in Jakarta, Indonesia, "but it was worth it." 

Each time the woman, Tuti, visited her Sunday School class, Jean gave her 
a Bible to use. Tuti didn't want to keep the Bible, even through it was offered to 
her. 

"When a new Indonesian reference Bible was published just before Christ- 
mas, 1 decided to give each of my class members a new Bible, hoping that Tuti 
would accept one along with everyone else," Jean explains. 

She did. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Scott Church 

ASSOCIATIONAL DISCIPLESHIP TRAINING REPORT 

Discipleship Training is the organization assigned the task of helping church 
members, new church members, and church leaders grow in their Christian 
discipleship. The Discipleship Training program does not compete with other 
church programs, but when properly administered, enhances the total work of the 
church. 

The discipleship Training Program has responsibility for teaching in five 
major content areas. These are: Christian Doctrine, Christian Ethics, Christian 
History, Church Policy & Organization, and Skill Development (in performing the 
function of a New Testament church). 

During this past church year Discipleship Training in our association: 

1. Took Associational Team to ADTT Conference at Ridgecrest. 

2. Went to Strategic Planning Meeting. 

3. No "M" night held. 

Some ofthe goals set by our associational Discipleship Training Team for this 
year are: 

1. Begin one new Discipleship Training Programs (ongoing or short term). 

2. Increase the Discipleship Training Enrollment by 5%. 

To strengthen the Discipleship Training programs of our association and to 
begin new programs and groups we have an excellent Discipleship Training 
Team. They are as follows: 

Charles Craig Discipleship Training Director Mamie Craig Children Consultant 
Dale Luttrell Adults Consultant Mary Green Preschool Consultant 

Lloyd Buckner Youth Consultant Rev. Burl Jones — Mew Work 

We are available to serve the churches of Stony Fork Association. Please let 
us help you by informing us the particular training needs of your church. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Charles F. Craig, Director 



34 



STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



OBITUARIES 

Boone Fork Mrs. Nancy Pearson 

Long Ridge Mrs. Virginia Woodie 

Mt. Ephraim Mrs. Dorothy Miller 

Mrs. Annie Randall 

Rock Spring Mr. Tom Simmons 

Respectfully submitted, 
Linda Mills Clerk 



RESOLGTIONS 

Let it be so resolved that Stony Fork Association expresses its appreciation 
to Bailey's Camp and Boone Fork Churches for their hospitality and delicious 
food. 

We also appreciate the Christian fellowship and the excellent speakers and 
reports we have heard this year. 

Betty Woods 



STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



35 



STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



36 



STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



HISTORY AND HISTORICAL TABLE 







Mode t ato r 


er 






Zions (jdic Meciing 










House Wilkts Co 


Laikin Hod es 


Larkin Pi es 


Elder Larkin Hod 


1 863 


Yellow Hill 


Larkin Hodges 


Larkin Pi es 
ar in ipes 


Wilson Bradshaw 


1 864 


Minutes w^u^c noi pnnl 


(J ma'nuscri " o"l051 






1 865 




' "La'rkm'Hod^°e's 


1 . R. Hodges 


lose h Harrison 


1 866 


Sou h^Kor'k" 


LKk'n Hodges 


E 1 i| ah Tr i ve 1 1 


Larkin Hodges 


1857 




Larkin Hodges 


lames Parsons 


) . R. Carlton 


1 868 


Un/n^'' 






James Parsons 


1 869 


Stony l-otk 


Larkin Hodges 


lam" Parsons 


W. H. Phillips 


1870 


Old I" icid 




amcs Parsons 


William Wilcox 


1871 


Elk 


Larkin Hodges 


amcs Parsons 


James Parsons 


1 872 




Larkin Hodges 


lames Parsons 


J . R . Carlton 


1873 


WataugT*^" 


Larkin Hodges 


Wi'lliam'E^^Greene 


Larkin Hodges 


1 874 


Yellow Hill 








1875 




Larkin Hodges 


William E Greene 


Levi W ilson 


1 876 


St^on^' fork 


Larkin Hodges 


William E. Greene 


Larkin Hodges 


1 877 


Poplar Grove 


Larkin Hodges 


Elijah T ri vei t 


James Parsons 


1 878 


Old Kicid 






1 . R. Carlton 


1 879 


1 1 k 


Larkin Hodges 


William t Greene 








Larkin Hodges 


William E Greene 


Monroe Gra^^ 


1 88 1 


W a 1 dugd 


Larkin Hodges 


El'i ah'rrivell'^'^"' 


Le°vi WMson 


1 882 




I F Eller 


lohn R Hod es 


lames Parsons 


1883 


V Iti-HK Mill 
I now n 1 1 1 


1 p Eller 


Lilian I r i vc 1 1 


Larkin Hod es 


1 884 


Boones Fork 






Larkin Pipes^^ 


1 885 




) F Eller 


Thomas Pipes 


1 p Eller 


1 886 


Stc'ri^'^ForT*^ 


E . M . G ragg 


Wm . M, Lee 




1 887 


Union ^ 


E . M . G ragg 




Oavid Eller 


1 888 


Lciurel rork 




Wm' M Lee 




1 889 




F . M . G ragg 


Wm M Lee 


John F. Eller 


1 890 


wTver^on''^ 




Wm M Lee 


F M firaoo 


1 89 1 


W atauga 


t . M. Gragg 


Wm M Lee 


J . C. Miller 




Ml. Pa ran 


E . M . G ragg 


Wm' m' Lee 


E. M. Gragg 


1 893 




E . M . G ragg 


Wm M Lee 


S. T. Carroll 




V P 1 Inn, Mill 

I t: no w n 1 ' 1 


E. M. Gragg 




John F Eller 


1 895 


New R i vu r 


E . M . Gragg 


Wm M Lee 


Geo W Trivell 


1 896 


t Ik 


E. M . Gragg 


Wm M Lee 


J C. Miller 


1 897 




E ■ M . G r agg 


Wm M Lee 




1 898 


Buffal'o^Cove 


) . C. Miller 


Wm M Lee 


J . F , Davis 


1 899 


m'i Ve°rnon^ 


F M CiAOa 
c . ivi . \ji dgg 


R. H. Pipes 


J. J. I. Sherwood 


1 900 




E . M , G f agg 




D. C Harman 


1 90 1 


Ston^^Fork 


I C Miller 


Wm, M. Lee 


) ohn Crisp 


1 902 


Po"lar Grove 


1 . C Milter 


A. ) . Shull 


J. C. Blaylock 


1 903 


Boones fXT 


F . M . G ragg 


Wm . M . Lee 


J . C. Miller 


1 904 


Mt E hr m 


P.M. Gragg 




F M firafo 


1 905 


Mt Paran 


E . M. Gragg 


Wm M Lee 


AsTbTow" 


1 906 


Yellow Hill 


Thos L Day 


Wm M. Lee 




1 907 






Wm M Lee 


J F Davis 


1 908 


Middle Cane 






J . C. Miller 






1 1 1 o s . i_ . Udy 


Wm m' Lee 


J.C Miller 


1910 


Laurel Fork 


Thrtt. 1 Hav, 
1 n<J5 . L . Udy 


W m M Lee 






M t . V ernon 


1 nob . i_ . Udy 


W m M Leo 


D. M Wheeler 


1912 




Thos. L. Day 


W m . M . Lee 


R. F . Wilcox 


1913 


Watauga 


Thos. L. Day 


N, S. Hampion 


N. S, Hampton 


1914 


Mt, Ephriam 


Thos. L. Day 


Wm, M. Lee 


Wm. M. Lee 


1915 


Boones Fork 


Thos. L. Day 


Wm. M. Lee 


D. M. Wheeler 


1916 


Rock Springs 


B. F. Wilcox 


Wm. M. Lee 


Wm. M. Lee 


1917 


Ml. Paran 


B. F. Wikox 


N , S. Hampton 


N. S, Hampton 


1918 


Due to the outbreak ol 


intluenzd no Association was held. 






1919 


Yellow Hill 


B. F. Wilcox 


N. S. Hampton 


B. F. Wilcox 


1920 


Mt. Vernon 


B. F. Wikox 


N. S. Hampion 


N. S. Hampton 


1921 


Laurel Fork 


B. F. Wilcox 


N. S. Hampton 


D. M. Wheeler 


1922 


Watauga 


B. F. Wilcox 


N. S. Hampion 


Oscar Dellinger 


1923 


Poplar Grove 


B.F. Wilcox 


N. S. Hampton 


N. S. Hampton 


1924 


Boones Fork 


B. F. Wilcox 


1 . Amos Hampton 


W. D. Ashley 


1925 


Mt. Ephriam 


B. F. Wilcox 


|. Amos Hampton 


J. A. Hampton 


1926 


Rock View 


D. M. Wheeler 


) . Amos Hampion 


G. M. Watson 



STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



37 



1927 


Elk 


D. M Wheeler 


R. F . Wilcox 






Wa Iaug3 


D M Wheeler 


B, F. Wilcox 


B F Wilcox 


1929 


Sandy Klai 


DM. Wheeler 


B. F. Wilcox 


G , M Wa ison 


1930 




W D. Ashley 


B. F. Wilcox 




1931 




W. D. Ashley 


B. F. Wilcox 


B. F. Wilcox 


1 932 


New Hopewell 


G M Watson 


B. F . Wilcox 


G ^'^Waisofi 


1 933 


Yellow Hill 


B. F. Wilcox 


Roy Keller 




1934 






Roy Keller 


R. H. Shore 


1935 


Gran^^mmher Ga 


G W Graec 


Roy Keller 


W. 1 . Cook 


1 936 


Mt Ephriam 


G W Graee 


Roy Keller 


Carl Triplett 


1937 


Mt View 


B. F . Wilcox 


G . M W atson 




1938 




Car! T r ip le 1 1 




W Ashley 


1939 


Laurel Fork 


Carl Tripleii 


F L Ham''lon 


W. I . Cook 


1940 


Bailey Camp 


Carl Triplett 


F L Hdmp'on 


G M Waison 


1941 


Sandy Flat 


Lee 1 . Church 


N . L . H ar r isori 


Roy Keller 


1 942 


New Hopewell 


Lee ) , Church 


N . L H ar r ison 


B P Wilcox 


1943 


Boones Fork 


Lee ) . Church 


N . L . H ar r ison 


W. B. Bryant 


1 944 


Watauga 


N. L. Harrison 


W. M. Brown 


Frank K n igh i 


1945 


Lay town 


N. L. Harrison 


W. M. Brown 


W. D, Ashley 


1946 


Ml. Vernon 


G. M. Watson 


W. M. Brown 


W. D. Ashley 


1947 


Yellow Hill 


Theo Hendrix 


G , M . Watson 




1948 


No Mmutes, Manuscript lost at printers. Held with Doe Ric 


ge Church. 




1949 


Mt, Paran 


Theo Hendrix 


G. M. Wat son 


Roscoe Greene 


1 950 


Rol k Springs 


T heo Hendrix 


N. L. Harrison 


R L Barnes 


195 1 


New Hopewell 


Theo Hendrix 


N . L . H arrison 




1952 


Boones Fork 


G. M. Watson 


) . Merritt Coffey 


W. 1 , Cook 


1953 


East Flats 


Theo Hend ri X 


G. M. Watson 


R. L, Barnes 


1 954 


Mt, Ephriam 


Theo Hendrix 


G. M . Watson 


Lloyd ) Ouller 


1955 


Bailey Camp 


T hco Hend ri x 


G . M . Watson 


W . 1 , Cook 


1956 


Laurel Fork 


Theo Herid r i \ 


1. Merritt Cottcy 


W. M. Brown 


1957 


Mt. Vernon and 










Sandy Flat 


Theo Hend ri \ 


Merritt Coffc 
erritt o ey 


W ) Cook 


1958 


Laytown and 










Rock Springs 


Theo Hendrix 


Merritt Cofic 
erritt o ly 


Carson Lggers 


1959 


New Hopewell and 










Long Ridge 


Carson Eggers 


Merritt Coffc 
erri o ty 




1 960 


M t. Paran and 










Boones Fork 


Carson Eggers 


Merritt Colic 
erritt o cy 


Wendell Cn ch r 
en e n c er 


1961 


Watauga and 










Yellow Hill 


Carson Eggers 


Merritt Coftc 
erritl o ey 


Du ree Gow n 
upree owdn 


1962 


Mt. Ephriam and 










Sandy Flat 


Carson Eggers 


MiS5 Winilred Hjm t n 
iSi ini re jmpton 


Roby McNeil 


1963 


Doc Ridge and 










Rock Springs 


Carson Eggers 


Miss Winifred Hampton 


W. M Blown 


1964 


Bailey 's Camp 


E. 0. Bustle 


Mrs. Clark Storie 


Wm. Quinn 




Boones Fork 


E. 0. Bustle 


Mrs. Clark Storie 




1965 


Laurel Fork 


E. O. Bustle 


Mrs. Clark Storie 


W M Brown 




Laytown 


E.O. Bustle 


Mrs. Clark Storie 




1966 


Longridge 


Archie Clawson 


Mrs. Clark Storie 


Phillip Martin 




Mt. Paran 


A . C. Moody 


Mrs. Clark Storie 




1967 


Mt. Vernon 


Archie Clawbon 


Mrs Clark Storie 


BasH 'le'i't'e'r^^"""^ 




New Hopewell 


Archie Clawson 


Mrs. Clark Storie 


E . 0. B usllc 


1968 


Rock springs 


A C. Moody 


Mrs Clark Storie 






Sandy Flat 


Archie Clawson 


Mrs. Clark Slorie 


Ra'^nenM'a'theson 


1969 


Baileys Camp 


Lewis Hodge 


Mrs. Clark Storie 


Lewis^Hod e 




Boones Fork 


Lewis Hodge 


Mrs, Clark Storie 


He* 'in Crfi 


1970 


Laurel Fork 


Lewis Hodges 


Mrs Max West 


d"^''!)" Austin 




Doe Ridge 


Lewi5 Hodges 


Mrs Max West 


Archie c'lawson 


1971 


Laytown 


David Austin 


Mrs. Max W est 


Raymond^Tu°byhll 




Longridge 


David Austin 


Mrs. Max West 


Shcrrill Welborn 


1972 


Mt, Ephriam 


David Austin 


Mrs. Max West 


Gurney Robbins 




Mount Paran 


David Austin 


Mrs, Max West 


A . C . Mood y 


1973 


Mt. Vernon 


Marvin Saunders 


Mrs. Max West 


Everettc Watson 




New Hopewell 


Marvin Saunders 


Mrs. Max West 


Shernll Welborn 


1974 


Rock Springs 


Marvin Saunders 


Mrs. Max West 


Merle |ohnson 




Sandy Flat 


Marvin Saunders 


Mrs. Max West 


Dale Milsiead 


1975 


Yellow Hill 


Merle johnson 


Mrs. Max West 


Dean Hodges 




Bailey's Camp 


Merle Johnson 


Mrs. Max West 


Max West 


1976 


Boones Fork 


Charles Craig 


Barbara West 


A. C. Moody 




Doe Ridge 






Lloyd Hoilman 


1977 


Laurel Fork 


Charles Craig 


Barbara West 


Raymond Hendrix 




Laytown 


Charles Craig 


Barbara West 


Max West 



38 



STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



1978 Long Ridge 


Charles Craig 


Barbara West 


Philip Martin 


Mount Ephnann 


Charles Craig 


Barbara West 


A.C. Moody 


1979 Mount Vernon 


Max West 


Barbara West 


Harold Bean 


1979 Boone Fork 


Max West 


Barbara West 


Harold Danner 


1980 Mount Paron 


Max West 


Barbara West 


Jim Lambert 


1980 New Hopewell 


Max West 


Barbara West 


Burl Jones 


1981 Rock Spring 


Max West 


Barbara West 


Cannon Ward 


1981 Sandy Flat 


Max West 


Barbara West 


Jim Lambert 


1982 Watauga 


Max West 


Barbara West 


Jack White 


1982 Bailey Camp 


Max West 


Barbara West 


Cecil Gragg 


1983 Boone Fork 


Jack White 


Barbara West 


Burl Jones 


1983 Doe Ridge 


Jack White 


Barbara West 


J.R, Robbins 


1984 Laurel Fork 


Jack White 


Linda Mills 


Jack White 


Laytown 


Jack White 


Linda Mills 


Ed Greene 


1985 Long Ridge 


J R Robbins 


Linda Mills 


Scott Church 


Mount Ephriam 


J R Robbins 


Linda Mills 


Ed Greene 


1986 Rock Spring 


J.R. Robbins 


Linda Mills 


Scott Church 


Sandy Flat 


J.R. Robbins 


Linda Mills 


Max West 


1987 Bailey Camp 


J.R- Robbins 


Linda Mills 


Greg Mathis 


1987 Boone Fork 


J.R. Robbins 


Linda Mills 


Everett Little 


1988 Doe Ridge 


Scott Church 


Linda Mills 


Kenneth Ridings 


1988 Laytown 


Scott Church 


Linda Mills 


Carter Moretz 


1989 Long Ridge 


Scott Church 


Linda Mills 


Alex Booth 


1989 Mt- Ephriam 


Scott Church 


Linda Mills 


Carter Moretz 


1990 Rock Spring 


George Berry 


Linda Mills 


Scott Church 


1990 Sandy Flat 


George Berry 


Linda Mills 


Max West 


1991 Baity Camp 


George Berry 


Linda Mills 


Jimmy Hubbard 


1991 Boone Fork 


George Berry 


Linda Mills 


Eugene Fillers 



The churches, Buffalo Cove, Cool Springs, Wilkes County Elk, Stony Fork, and Yellow Hill, formerfy belonging to other 
associations 

Met at the Stony Fork Baptist Church and organized the Stony Fork Baptist Association on November 9th and 10th, 1860. 
tor this meeting appointed Elder Larkin Hodges. Moderator and Bro Elijah Trivetle, Clerk. 



STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 39 

STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



Table A — Church Membership and Other Information 



TABU A CHUnCH MEMBERSHIP AND OTHER INFOAMATION YEAR ENDING Julv 31, 1991 




1 




Association IMonth & Oayl 
Stony Fork 


County 


Pastor Y/N 


I 
i 

i 




[Mractof oi As$oci(1ian*l Misaons 

Burl Jones 


Rt. 1, Box 737, Booftet, N.C. 28606 ^'^ 




PASTORS & ADDRESSES IINCIUOE ZIP CODE! 


Bailey^ Camp 


Max West, Rt. 1, Box 539, Blowing Rock, N.C. 28506 


Watauga 


Y 


19 


Boone Fork 


Eugene Fillers, 111 LaMesa Ct. Lenoir, N.C. 28645 


Watauga 


Y 


19 


Doe Ric3ge 


Arvil Hardy, Rt. 5, Bos 699, Boone, N.C. 28607 


Watiauga 


Y 


19' 


Laytovm 


None 


Caldwei: 


N 


- 


Long RicSge 


George Berry, Rt. 1, Box 318, Sugar Grove , N . C . 28679 


Avery 


Y 


191 


Mt . Ephraira 


Burl Jones, Rt. 1, Box 737,Boonier, N.C. 28606 


Watauga 


y 


191 


Rock Spring 


Scott Church, Rt. 1, Box 120, Purlear,N.C. 28665 


Wilkes 


Y 


19.' 


Sandy Flat 


Sam Silver, P.O. Box 1113, Blowing Rock , N . C . 28605 


Watauga 


Y 


19< 













































































































































































BSS8 - 1297 (Rev. 1-91) 



TOTALS 



PREVIOUS Y€AR TOTALS 



3 


4 


S 


8 


7 


8 


a 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


Year organized as a church 


Location Code (1 thru 0) 


Racial/ethnic group (1 thru 6) 


1 Two Sunday services Y/N 1 


Baptisms under 6 yr3 ol age 


Baptisms 6-8 yrs ol age 


Baptisms 9-11 yrs. ol age 


Baptisms 12-17 yrs. ol age 


O 

t2 
cc 




Baptisms 30-59 yrs, ol age 


Baptisms 60 yrs & over 


Total Baptisms 


Other additions (by letter, 
statement, etc ) 


Members lost (by letter, 
death, statement, etc.) 


PresenI resident members 


Present nonresident members 


Grand total present members 


1938 


1 


5 


N 





























2 


52 


20 


72 


1872 


1 


5 


N 








1 


1 








2 


4 








32 





32 


1894 


1 


5 


Y 





























3 


45 


20 


65 


1939 


1 


5 


N 


























3 


2 


33 


37 


70 


1945 


1 


5 


Y 

















1 





1 





2 


35 


17 


54 


1876 


1 


5 


Y 


























1 


2 


33 


123 


156 


1891 


1 


5 


Y 





1 


4 


9 





2 





16 


4 


15 


95 


7 


102 


1928 


1 


5 


Y 
































70 


18 


88 









































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































1 


5 


10 





3 


2 


17 


8 


26 


395 


242 


1039 































Table B — Sunday School 



TARiF R siiiunAv sr.Mnni YFAP FNOING July ^1 1991 


S3 


54 


55 


Association (Month & Dayl 
St:ony Fork 


Cradle Roll enrollment 
IBirth to 2 yearsi 


Preschool enrollment 
IBirth through 5 yearsi 


Children enrollment 

(6-1 1 years or grades 1-61 


State 

North Carolina 


Associalional Sunday School Direcloi 
Danny Crowdec 


Address City State Zip 
Rt. 2, Newland, N.C. 28657 


CHURCHES 


SUNDAY SCHOOL DIRECTORS & ADDRESSES (INCLUDE ZIP COOEI 


BaileyiCamp 


Owen Tolbert/ P.O. Box 1121 / Blovmig Rcx:k, N.C. 28605 


U 


1 


A 
H 


Boone Fork 


Don Harrison, Rt. 1, Box 703, Blowing Rock, N.C. 28605 





1 


5 


Doe Ridge 


Floyd Presnell, P.O. Box 3375, Bcxine, N.C. 28607 











Laytown 


Charles Smith, Rt. 5, Box 327, Lenoir, N.C. 28645 





2 


1 


Long Ridge 


Danny Crowder, Rt. 2, Newland, N.C. 28657 


1 


6 


3 


Mt. Ephraim 


James Cox, Box 248, Deep Gap, N.C. 28618 


2 





2 


Rock Spring 


Ted Triplett, Rt. 2, Ferguson, N.C. 28624 








13 


Sandy Flat 


Jerry Craig, P.O. Box 183, Blowing Rock,, N.C. 28605 





2 


7 












































































































































































BSSB- 1297 (Rev. 1-81) 


TOTALS 


3 


12 


35 


PREVIOUS YEAR TOTALS 











57 


58 


59 


60 


61 


62 


63 


64 


65 


66 


67 


68 


69 


70 


71 


72 




Young Adult enrollment 
(18-24 years or H.S. graduation 
througti 24 years) 


Young Adull enrollment 
(25-34 years) 


Adult enrollment 
(35-64 years) 


Senior Adull enrollment 
(65 and over) 


Adults Away enrollment 


Homebound enrollmenl 


General officers enrollmenl 


Olfier ongoing Bible study 


Enrollmenl of mission(s) 
of church 


Total ongoing Sunday 
School enrollment 


Average weekly Sunday 
School attendance 


Number ot single adults 


Church V.B.S. 
enrollment 


Mission V.B.S. 
enrollmenl 


January Bible Sludy attendance 


No. of ethnic S.S. members 




5 





10 


5 








3 








30 


20 





40 













3 





12 











1 








28 


18 





21 













1 


1 


10 




















18 


16 






















2 


12 


1 








1 








25 


19 





21 













5 


4 


14 


6 








5 








49 


35 
























13 


20 








3 








41 


41 



















2 


3 


21 


3 








12 








70 


52 


2 


70 
















7 


16 


11 








3 








54 


28 


2 


40 















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































17 




108 


46 








28 








315 


212 




192 




























mm 

i8B9 






m 





Table C — Discipleship Training 



TABIE C DISaPLESHIP TRAINING VEAB FNniMn July 31 1991 


73 


Association (Monlh & Day) 
Stony Fork 


Preschool enrollment 

(5 years and under-not In 

school) 


State 

North Carolina 


Associattonal Church Training Director 
Charles Craig 


Address Ctty State Zip 
Rt. 3, Box 730 Boone, M r ?flmS 


CHURCHES 


CHURCH TRAINING DIRECTORS & AOORESS (INCLUDE ZIP CODE) 


Boone Fork 


Don Harrison/ Rt. 1/ Box 703, Blowing Rock/ N.C. 28605 


1 


Sandy Flat 


Mamie Craig/ Rt. 3/ Box 730/ BoonS/ N.C. 28605 















































































































































BSSB- 1297 (Rev. 1-91) 


TOTALS 


1 


PREVIOUS YEAR TOTALS 





4 


75 


76 


77 


78 


79 


<0 


81 


82 


83 


84 


85 


86 


16-1 1 vears or grades 1-61 | 


Youth enrollment 

(12-17 years or grades 7-121 


Adult enrollment 
(18 and over) 


General otflcers enrollment 


New Church Memtier 
Training 


Baptist Doctrine 
Study 


DiscipleYouth and 
DIscipleLife 


Equipping Center 


LIFE 


Leader Training and other 
Discipleship Training 

1 


Enrollment of mission{s) 
of church 


Total Discipleship 

Training enrollmenl/participatior 


Average weekly Discipleship 
Training attendance 




4 


9 


1 

















2 





19 


12 




9 


20 


3 























37 


15 


























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































13 


29 


4 


n 














2 





56 


27 





























Table D — Music Ministry 



TABLE D MUSIC MINISTRY YEAR ENfllNn July .^1 iMl 


87 


Association (Month i Day) 
Stony Fork 


lool enrollment 


Stale 

Nortih Carolina 


Associational Music Directoi 
Pauline Eldreth 


Address City State Zip 
434 Grand Blvd. Boone, N.C. 28605 


CHURCHES 


MUSIC DIRECTORS & ADDRESSES IINCLUOE ZIP CODE) 


Presch 


Bai ley^ Can^ 


Glenn Bolick, Rt. 8, Lenoir/ N.C. 28645 





Mt. Ephraim 


None 





Rock Spring 


Lynette Watson, Rt. 2, Ferguson, NC. 28624 





Sandy Flat 


Kathy Tovmsend, Rt. 3, Box 117, Boone, N.C. 28607 


2 
































































































































BSSB- 1297 (Rev. 1-91) 


TOTALS 


2 


PREVIOUS YEAR TOTALS 







88 


89 


90 


91 


92 


93 


94 


9S 


96 


97 


it 


Younger children's enrollment 
(6-8 years) 


Older children s enrollmeni 
(9-11 years) 


Youth enrollmeni 
(12-17 years) 


Adult enrollment 
118 and overl 


Handbell ringers enrollment 


Vocal ensembles enrollment 


Instrumental ensembles 
enrollment 


General music 
leaders enrollment 


Enrollmeni of Mission(s) 
of church 


Total ongoing Music Ministry 
enrollment 


C 1 

i ~ 

^ ^ 

a. 

c = 
< 5 


2 


1 


2 


16 











2 





23 


23 

















3 





2 





5 


5 





3 


10 


15 








2 


2 





32 


6 


4 


3 


4 














2 





15 


5 

















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































6 


7 


16 


31 





3 


2 


8 





75 


39 

























Table E — Woman's Missionary Gnion 



TARIF F WnMAM'C MISSinUABV IIMinM VFAR FMHINR Jill? 31 1991 


99 


Association (Month & Oayl 
Stony Fork 




State 

North Carolina 


Mission Friends 
(5 years and under— 
not in school) 


Associational WMU Director 
Eunice Luttrell 


'^""'m:. 1, Box 650 Blowing fefck, j^State 28605^'" 


CHURCHES 


WMU DIRECTORS & ADDRESSES (INCLUDE ZIP CODE) 


Baileys Canp 


Edith Gryder, Rt. 2, Box 182, Blowing Rock,N.C. 28605 





Boone Fork 


Linda Mills, Rt. 1, Box 596, Blowing Rock, N.C. 28605 





Laytown 


Vera Dula, Rt. 1, Box 102, Ferguson, NC. 28624 





Long Ridge 


Norma Crowder, Rt. 2, Newland, N.C. 28657 





Rock Spring 


Linda Church, Rt. 1, Box 120, Purlear, N.C. 28665 





Sandy Flat 


Margaret Moody, Rt. 1, Box 294, Blowing Rock, N.C. 28605 





























BSSB - 1297 (Rev- 1-91) 


TOTALS 





PREVIOUS YEAR TOTALS 





Table F — Brotherhood 



TABLE F BROTHERHOOD 




YEAR ENDING Ti'iJ 31 


1991 


114 


Association 

Stony Fork 




(Month & Dayl 






State North Girolina 


1 


Associational B(Oth«rhood Director 

rWanni.ci nalc.c; . 


1 


Address 

Rt . 2 , Ferguson 


City 


N.C. 28624 ^"'^ 




years ( 


CHURCHES 


BROTHERHOOD DIRECTORS & ADDRESSES (INCLUDE ZIP CODE) 


IS 


Rock Spring 


Dennis Oaks, 


Rt. 2, Ferguson, N.C. 28624 































BSSB - 1297 (Rev. 1-91) 




TOTALS 










PREVIOUS YEAR TOTALS 

















101 I 102 I 103 I 104 I 10S~ 



I 110 [ 111 



Number of Organizations 



hi 


1 

Si ? 

*s| 

ill 
5^ ™ 


s_ 

li 
la 


h 
1% 


ii 

ll 


Mission Friends 
(5 yeare and under- 
not in school) 


If" 


& 

g~ 

a^i. 


1 

-1 X 


BaptisI Women 
{35andovw) 


1 


1 
If 

2 € 


1 

11 
li 








1 





1 














8 


4 





12 








1 





1 














4 


2 





6 


1 





1 





2 








6 




5 


2 





14 








1 





2 





5 





2 


7 


2 





16 


1 





1 





3 





3 


8 





10 


6 





27 








1 








1 











6 


2 





8 










































































































2 





6 





9 


1 


8 


14 


3 


40 


18 





83 





























115 


116 


117 


lie 


119 


120 


121 


122 


123 


? 
c 

o 

■S S. 


Pioneers 

(12-14 years or grades 7-9) 


High sctiool BaptisI Young 
Men enrollmenl 


BdplisI Young Men 
enrollment 


BaptisI Men enrollment 


Mission Project 
Participation 


Oigoing Missions 

Action Groups Participation 


Enrollmenl ol mission(s) 
o( church 


Total ongoing Brollierhood 
enrollmenl 


3 


3 


6 

















12 










































































3 


3 


6 











tJ 


— 


it 





















Table Q — Total Receipts, Local Expenditures & Stewardship 



TABLE G TOTAL RECEIPTS. LOCAL EXPENDITURES & STEWARDSHIP YEAR ENDING .Tilly "^1 1991 


124 


Association (Month & Oayl 
Stony Fork 


Undesignated gifts 
offerings, etc 


State 

North Carolina 


Associational Treasurei 
Edith Gryder 


Address City State Zip 
Rt-. 7. Rnv IR?. Rlnwing Ror.k , N.C. ?.fi605 


CHURCHES 


TREASURER & ADDRESSES (INCLUDES ZIP CODE) 


BaileyiCanip 


Mabel McLean, Rt. 8, Lenoir, N.C. 28645 


8404 


Boone Fork 


Linda Mills, Rt. 1, Box 596, Blowing Rock, N.C. 28605 


8143 


Doe Ridge 


Pauline Eldreth, 434 Grand Blvd., Boone, N.C. 28607 


4430 


Laytovm 


Glenda Dillard, Rt. 5, Box 324, Lenoir, N.C. 28645 


7715 


Long Ridge 


Carol Thomas, Rt., 2, Box 507, Newland, NC. 28657 


15322 


Mt. Ephraim 


Sherlene Watson, Box 443, Deep Gap, N.C. 28618 


14845 


Rock Spring 


Patricia Smith, Beacon Hill, Lenoir, N.C. 28645 


26200 


Sandy Flat 


Charles Craig, Rt. 3, Box 730, Boone, N.C. 28607 


25381 








































































































BSSB - 1297 (Rev- 1-91) 


TOTALS 


110440 


PREVIOUS YEAR TOTALS 





25 


126 


127 


128 


129 


130 


131 


132 


133 


134 


135 


Olfennqs, etc 


Total tithes, all offenngs, 
and special gifK 


All other receipts 


Total Receipts 


fytonev borrowed 
during the year 


Church staff salaries 


Money paid out on new 
construction during the 
year 


Debt retirement during 


Church literature 


All other local 
expenditures 


Total local expenditures 


oo 


8604 





8604 





2280 








579 


1033 


3892 


42 


9885 





9885 





3450 








359 





3809 


36 


6266 





6266 





1400 








91 


3520 


5011 


54 


8669 





8669 














365 


6840 


7200 


48 


15770 





15770 





6940 


104 


2525 


883 


479 


10931 


70 


16615 


2233 


18848 





7665 


3463 





141 





11269 


69 


29869 





29869 





11020 








1128 


6933 


19081 





25381 





25381 





2920 








555 


8950 


12425 
























































































































































































































































































































































































719 


121059 


2233 


123292 





35675 


3567 


2525 


4041 


27755 


73618 

























Table H — Mission Expenditures 



TABLE H MISSION EXPENDITURES YEAR ENDING July 31 199^ 


136 1 137 n 


Association (Month & Davl 
Stony Fork 


Money paid out on new S 
construction during the 5 
year 5 


All other church ^ 
sponsored mission g 
expenditures 5 


^'^'^^orth Carolina 


*"°£'iK^j' ftl'ils 


1, Box 596 "^"Ifelowing Rock ^'^'^ N.C. 28605 ^'P 


CHURCHES 


CHURCH CLERKS & ADDRESSES (INCLUDES ZIP COOEI 


Baileys Camp 


Roy Gryder, Rt. 2, Box 182, Blowing Rock, N.C. 28605 








Boone Fork 


Sue Harrison, Rt. 1, Box 703, Blowing Rock, N.C. 28605 








Doe Ridge 


Pauline Eldreth, 434 Grand Blvd. Boone, NC. 28607 








Laytovm 


Bonnie Walsh, Rt. 5, Box 315, Lenoir, N.C. 28645 








Long Ridge 


Norman Woodie, Rt. 2, Box 508, Lenoir, N.C. 28645 








Mt. Ephraim 


Lezett Greer, Rt.l, Box 564, Boone, N.C. 28607 








Rock Spring 


Betty Woods, Rt. 2, Box 43, Ferguson, N.C. 28624 








Sandy Flat 


Jerry Moretz, Rt. 5, Box 67, Boone, N.C. 28607 
















































































































































BSSB- 1297 (Rev. 1-91) 


TOTALS 








PREVIOUS YEAR TOTALS 







138 


139 


140 1 141 1 142 1 143 1 144 1 145 | 146 | 147 | 148 | 149 


150 


SIONS 


Cooperative Program 


OTHER MISSION CAUSE EXPENDITURES 


Grand Total 
Mission expenditures 


Total church sponsored | 
mission expenditures 


Associational missions 
program 


State missions 


SB Home 

Missions (incl. Annie Arm 
strong Easter ottering} 


SB Foreign 
Missions (incl, Lottie 
Moon Christmas offering) 


SB Christian 

education (schools, etc.l 


SB Children's 
homes 

leash plus goods) 


SB Hospitals 


SB Homes 
for the aged 


All other (Bible 
Societv, Temperance 
League, etc ) 


Total other mission 
cause expenditures 








650 








550 














4300 


5500 


5500 





147 


425 


207 


272 


310 





226 


114 


125 





1679 


1826 





218 


248 














1836 


100 








2184 


2402 











220 


100 


200 





900 





200 





1620 


1620 





1739 





69 


368 








200 





248 





885 


13553 





1124 


600 


























600 


1724 





3907 


1199 


85 


816 


1316 








74 





3352 


6842 


10749 





312 


2187 


743 


1120 


2069 





500 


717 


914 


3209 


11459 


11770 































































































































































































































































































































































































































































7447 


5309 


1324 


2676 


4445 





3662 


1005 


1487 


10861 


30819 


49126 





























Table I — Special Information 



TABLE 1 SPECIAL INFORMATION 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


2S 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 


Association 
Stonv Fork 


E 


No memtwrs lost to non- 
Baptist Churches 


Numl)er of tithers 


Cooperative Program goal as 
percent ol undesignated receipts 


Associational missions goal as 
percent ol undesignated receipts 


Total cost for heating, 
cooling, lighting, etc. 


Value ol church properly 


Tolal church debt at end of 
this associational year 


ll 

if *^ 

ll 

II *ir 


Budget Y/N 


No Church-type missions 
started dunng the year 


No. church-type missions 
currently operating 


North Carolina 


Year Endina ^--'l 1991 
(MoTiih & Ddy) 


ll 

il 

£ - 

1 S 
E m 


CHURCHES 


si 


BaileyaCamp 





1 


2 








919 


75,000 





N 


N 








Boone Fork 








7 


1 





1705 


100,000 





N 


N 








Doe Ridge 








6 


5 


5 


472 


65,000 





N 


Y 








Laytown 





1 


5 








533 


20,000 





N 


N 








Long Ridge 








8 


11 


4 


1088 


60,000 





N 


N 








Mt. Ephraim 








2 


10 








85,000 





N 


N 








Rock Spring 








35 


16 


5 


1072 


100,000 





N 


Y 








Sandy Flat 








16 


1 


10 


1137 








N 


N 


































































































































































































































































































































































































































































TOTALS 







fll 




6926 


525,000 












n 


PREVIOUS YEAH TOTALS 



















32 


33 


34 


3S 


36 


37 


38 


39 


40 


41 


42 1 43 1 44 1 45 1 46 1 47 { 48 { 49 


{ 50 I SI 1 S2 


No church-type misstoas 
(not primary sponsor) 


No. new Sunday School 
members 


($) Lottie Moon Offering 


($) Annie Armstrong Offering 


Number of persons coming 
to S.S.by bus/van 


el 
> ll 

i C 
II II 
Z (T 


No in Sunday School 
but not church member 


College students baptized 


* 

i «, 
f 1 


* 

f 
1 „ 


Q ^ 

o 

i" 


Does church have, observe, plan. use. etc? 


Weekly evang. visitation 


Family Ministry Days 


Recreation facility 


Christian Ufe Comm. 


Baptist Mens Day 


Pastor emp (apart Irom ch.) 


Bapl. Sem. Coll. Day 


Annuity Board protection 


1 Home Mission Sludy Book 


State caper m budget 





4 











N 


2 










N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


Y 


N 


N 


N 


N 





2 


310 


272 





N 








16 





N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


Y 


N 


N 


N 


Y 

















N 


4 





16 





N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


Y 


N 


N 


N 


M 





3 


200 


100 





N 








23 





N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


Y 


N 


N 


N 


N 











368 





N 








42 


29 


N 


N 


N 


Y 


N 


N 


Y 


N 


N 


N 


N 

















N 








48 





X 




N 


N 


N 


N 


Y 


N 


N 


N 


N 





4 


1316 


816 


17 


N 








72 





N 


Y 


N 


N 


-N.. 


N . 


X- 






■N— 


-N- 





2 


2069 


1120 





N 








30 


15 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 














































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































n 






2676 


17 




6 





2477 


44 























HOWARD 
CREEK RD. 



DOE RIDGEI 



Stony Fork Missionary Baptist Association Churches 



AVERY CO. 



SEVEN 
DEVILS 



\ 



BOONE 



705 



SANDY FLATI 




TO 
NORTH 
WILKESBORO 
421 



WILKES CO. 



INVILLEl 



227 



BOONE FORKI 



221 



\ 



LONGRIDGE 



GRAGG 



1517 



BLOWING I 
ROCK 



6:? 



GLOBE 



J 3, 



6? 



BAILEYS 
CAMP ■ 

1500 



BAILEYS 
CAMP 



CALDWELL CO. 



ROCK SPRING 



LAYTOWN 



BUFFALO COVE RD. 



268 /To^^'o^Lov^o 



^0 



o 
< 




STONY FORK 
MISSIONARY 
BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 
OF 

NORTH CAROLINA 
1998 ANNUAL 



1998 MINUTES OF THE 
ONE HUNDRED AND THIRTY-SEVENTH 
ANNUAL MEETING 
OF 

STONY FORK MISSIONARY BAPTIST ASSOCIATIOIN 

OF 

NORTH CAROLINA 
AT 

SANDY FLAT, AUGUST 7, 1998 

AND 

BAILEY'S CAMP, AUGUST 8, 1998 



1 

( 

1 

\ 

i 

] 

4 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Associational Leaders 1 

Suggested Order of Business 3 

Constitution and Bylaws 4 

Vacation Bible School 14 

International Missions 15 

Stewardship and Cooperative Program 17 

Evangelism 20 

Financial Report 21 

North American Mission Board 25 

N.C. State Missions 26 

Baptist Children's Homes 31 

Retirement Homes 35 

Baptist Hospital 36 

Christian Higher Education 38 

Biblical Recorder 40 

Discipleship Training 41 

Women On Mission 43 

Christian Action League 44 

Director of Missions 45 

Resolutions/Obituaries 48 

Budget 49 

Proceedings 50 



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OUTHERN BAPTIST CONVENTION 
SSOCIATIONAL LEADERS - 1998 



STATE CONVENTION 

North Carolina 



ASSOCIATION 

Stony Fork 



LING ADDRESS 



159: ttoMifield Rd. 



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Location (Churches or Places) 
)oe Ridge, Boone, NO 
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Opening Date 
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Time of Opening Session 

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SUGGESTED ORDER OF BUSINESS FOR 1999 
ONE HUNDRED AND THIRTY EIGHTH 
ANNUAL MEETING OF STONY FORK 
MISSIONARY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

FRIDAY MORNING, AUGUST 6, 199 
DOE RIDGE 

8:30 Call to Order 

8:35 Song 

8:40 Devotion 

8:50 Adoption of Program 

9:00 Roll Call 

9:05 Recognition of New Pastors and Workers 
9: 10 Vacation Bible School 
9:15 Foreign Missions 
9:25 Cooperative Program 

Stewardship 
9:40 Evangelism 
9:50 Finance Report - Budget 
10:00 Break 
10:10 Home Missions 
10:25 State Missions 
10:40 Children's Homes 
10:55 Retirement Homes 
11:10 Baptist Hospital 
11:25 Christian Higher Education 
11:40 Baptist Foundation 
12:10 Annual Message 
1 :00 Adjourn - Lunch 

SATURDAY MORNING, AUGUST 7, 1999 
LAYTOWN 



8:30 Call to Order 

8:35 Song 

8:40 Devotion 

8:50 Roll Call of Churches 

8:55 Sunday School Report 

9:00 Biblical Reporter 

9:05 Discipleship Training 

9:15 Women on Mission 

9:25 Christian Action League/Temperance and Morals 

9:50 General Board Report 

10:00 Break 

10:15 Resolutions 
10:20 Obituaries 

10:25 Business Meeting - Election of Officers - Approve Budget 
11:00 Annual Message 
12:00 Adjourn - Lunch 



3 



CONSTITUTION 



OF THE STONY FORK MISSIONARY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

PREAMBLE 

For the declaration of its fundamental purposes and the 
permanent guidance and control of its activities, the body does 
adopt the following as its constitution, to wit: 

ARTICLE I - Ncune and Membership 

SECTION 1. This body shall be known as the Stony Fork 
Missionary Baptist Association of North Carolina. 

SECTION 2 . The association is composed of Missionary 
Baptist Churches. 

SECTION 3 . Any Baptist church may be admitted into this 
Association upon recommendation of the Committee of Petitionary 
Letters and Constitution of the Churches Committee and the 
majority vote of members present at any meeting as prescribed in 
Article IX. 

SECTION 4. Any church, at her discretion, may withdraw from 
this body. 

SECTION 5. This association may, at any meeting, after an 
investigation and report of a duly authorized committee of the 
Association, by a majority vote, declare a dissolution of union 
with any church deemed corrupt, either in doctrine or practice. 

SECTION 6. Each church shall elect its messengers to the 
annual associational meeting. Each messenger must be certified 
in the annual church letter to the Association and must be 
appointed on the following ration: five messengers, in addition 
to the pastor, for each church having a membership not exceeding 
fifty, and one additional messenger for each increase of fifty. 
In no case shall the total number of messengers exceed ten for 
any given church, in addition to the pastor. 

SECTION 7. When any church shall fail to be represented by 
letter or messenger for two consecutive years, the Missions 
Committee shall confer with the church, and if satisfactory 
reason is not given, and there is no evidence that said church 
wishes to keep alive their affiliation with the Association, the 
committee shall bring its findings to the next Executive 
Committee meeting, and the Association shall, at that time, by a 
majority of present members, vote to withdraw fellowship. The 
Association recognizes the right of any affiliated church to 
withdraw its fellowship from the Association. 

SECTION 8. The Annual Associational meeting shall convene 
on Friday at 8:30 a.m. and adjourn at 1:00 p.m. (lunch to 
follow). It shall reconvene at 8:30 a.m. on Saturday and adjourn 
at the completion of business for the noon meal. This following 
the first Sunday in August. 

ARTICLE II - Purpose 

SECTION 1. The prime purpose of the Association shall be to 



4 



counsel together for the enlargement and strengthening of God's 
kingdom and to promote unity and growth among the churches 
composing it. 

SECTION 2. It shall be the purpose of this Association to 
enlist all of the churches into full cooperation with the North 
Carolina Baptist State Convention and the Southern Baptist 
Convention and their agencies in the work of missions, 
evangelism, christian education and social service. 

ARTICLE III - Powers and Prerogatives 

SECTION 1. The Association, when convened in meeting, shall 
sit as an advisory council and shall have no power to infringe on 
any of the internal rights and affairs of the member churches. 
It may advise, however, with the member churches and recommend 
measures of usefulness for their adoption or rejection. 

SECTION 2 . When grievances occur between any members or 
minority group of any church which is a member of the 
Association, The Association, the Executive Committee, or 
Missions Committee, or the committee designated by and acting for 
either of these bodies, may advise or give aid in matters which 
do not infringe on the rights of the local church, an this only 
on the invitation of the individual or group involved. 

SECTION 3 . Any church found unfaithful to the faith and 
practices common to the Association, as outlined in Addendum I - 
ARTICLES OF FAITH (the Baptist Faith and Message as adopted by 
the Southern Baptist Convention in 1963) shall be encouraged to 
correct such errors. If the conduct of said church is not 
corrected and is of such nature as to alienate said church from 
the orderly and faithful churches of the association, the 
Executive Committee of the Association can recommend that 
fellowship be withdrawn from said church, and upon a majority 
vote of the messengers in the annual session, fellowship of said 
church can be withdrawn. (See Article 1, Section 7). 

ARTICLE IV - The Executive Committee 

SECTION 1. The Association shall have an Executive 
Committee to serve as the Association between annual meetings, 
assisting in the overall work of the Association with such 
limitations as may be imposed by the constitution. 

SECTION 2. The Executive Committee shall be composed of the 
associational officers and the pastors, and the chairman of 
deacons, along with two elected lay persons from each church. 
Sixteen members shall constitute a quorum. The names of these 
persons shall be furnished annually to the associational clerk, 
if changes occur during the associational year, these changes 
shall be forwarded to the clerk. 

SECTION 3. At the beginning of each Executive Committee 
meeting, a roll call will be taken of each church and its 
representatives . 

SECTION 4. The Executive Committee shall meet on the second 
Sunday of September, November, March, and July. These meetings 
shall be held in churches of the Association, consecutively in 



5 



alphabetical order. 



ARTICLE V - Officers 

SECTION 1. The officers of this body shall be: Moderator, 
Vice-Moderator, Clerk, Treasurer, Sunday School Director, Church 
Training Director, Brotherhood Director, WMU Director, Vacation 
Bible School Director, Music Director, Pianist, and Evangelism 
Director. 

SECTION 2. The officers of the Association shall be elected 
at each regular Annual Associational Meeting. The Nominating 
Committee shall fill vacancies that may occur in the respective 
categories between annual meetings of the Association by bringing 
names to the Executive Committee for their approval 

SECTION 3. By the virtue of the office, the Associational 
Director of Missions is considered an ex-officio member of all 
associational committees. For all gualif ications and terms of 
office, see Article VII, Section 1. 

ARTICLE VI - Duties of Officers 

SECTION 1. It shall be the duty of the Moderator of the 
Association to preside over the annual sessions, and at the 
guarterly meetings of the Executive Committee. As the presiding 
officer, he shall open the meetings punctually at the appointed 
time, enforce the rules, preserve order, and exercise all the 
prerogatives f a presiding officer, according to the principles 
of established parliamentary usage. He shall provide leadership 
for a progressive ideal throughout the Association. He shall be 
elected for a one year term, and he shall not succeed himself for 
a maximum of two full terms. He shall appoint in advance any 
other committees he may deem necessary or advisable. Each of 
these committees shall report at the annual meeting for which 
they are appointed. It shall be the responsibility of the 
Moderator to call any needed meetings at any time he deems 
necessary. The moderator is considered an ex-officio member of 
all committees. 

SECTION 2. It shall be the duty of the Vice-Moderator to 
discharge the duties of the Moderator in his absence or at his 
reguest . 

SECTION 3. It shall be the duty of the clerk to keep an 
accurate record of the proceedings of the Association in regular 
and special sessions; to keep accurate records of quarterly 
meetings of the Executive Committee; to keep on file the printed 
minutes and other important documents belonging to the 
Association; to furnish the churches with blank letter forms on 
which to make the annual reports to the Association; to 
superintend the printing of the minutes, and to distribute them 
to the churches as soon after adjournment as possible. For this 
service, the clerk shall be paid annually an amount recommended 
by the Finance Committee and approved by the Association. 

SECTION 4. It shall be the duty of the treasurer to receive 
all funds of the Association and to disburse the same in 
accordance with the budget of the Association or for the purposes 



6 



for which the funds were contributed, to render to the 
Association an itemized report of the receipts and disbursements 
at the first session of the annual meeting. In the treasurer's 
absence, a member of the Finance Committee shall give the report. 
The treasurer shall make available through the associational 
newsletter a quarterly report including the contributions of each 
church in the Association. A quarterly report shall be made 
available at the quarterly meetings of the Executive Committee. 
For this service, the treasurer shall be paid annually an amount 
recommended by the Finance Committee and approved by the 
Association. 

SECTION 5. The Sunday School Director shall take the 
initiative in promoting inspirational meetings, study courses, 
and leadership classes for the churches of the Association. He 
shall work in cooperation with the denominational Sunday School 
agencies in promoting the denominational programs; and he will be 
responsible for coordinating and promoting Vacation Bible School 
work in conjunction with the Vacation Bible School Director. He 
shall also work with the Nominating Committee in enlisting 
leadership for his organization. 

SECTION 6. The Discipleship Training Director shall take 
the initiative in promoting the regular meetings projected by the 
State Convention and be available to the churches for help in 
strengthening the established unions and encourage the 
organization of new unions in churches without them. He shall 
also work with the Nominating Committee in enlisting leadership 
for his organization. 

SECTION 7. The Brotherhood Director shall be responsible 
for promoting missionary education within the Association and be 
available to the churches to assist in strengthening 
organizations and programs of existing units. He shall also work 
with the Nominating Committee in enlisting leadership for his 
organization. 

SECTION 8. The WMU Director shall be responsible for 
promoting missionary education within the Association and shall 
be available to the churches to assist in promoting and 
establishing new Baptist Women and Baptist Women auxiliary units, 
and shall assist in strengthening the organizations and programs 
of existing units. She shall also work with the Nominating 
Committee in enlisting leadership for her organization. 

SECTION 9. The Vacation Bible School Director shall work in 
conjunction with the Sunday School Director in enlisting and 
training workers, planning and organizing for the annual Vacation 
Bible School Clinic. 

SECTION 10. The Music Director shall take the initiative 
in promoting the meetings and activities suggested by the State 
Music Leadership and be available to the churches to help in 
strengthening their music programs. The Music Director will be 
responsible for the music at the associational and Executive 
Committee meetings. He shall also work with the Nominating 
Committee in enlisting leadership for his organization. 

SECTION 11. The Pianist will be responsible for playing the 
piano at all associational and Executive Committee meetings. 

SECTION 12. The Evangelism Chairman will work with the 



7 



Evangelism program in planning, promoting, and coordinating all 
evangelistic activities for the Association in conjunction with 
the Director of Missions. 



ARTICLE VIII - Director of Missions 

Statement of Purpose and Position Title: 

The office or position will be known as the Director of 
Missions for the Stony Fork Missionary Baptist Association. The 
Director of Minions shall provide responsible leadership in the 
work of the Association through performing such basic functions 
as the planning, correlation, and implementation of programs, 
program services, and ministries of the Association; counsel the 
churches; agencies of needs, problems, and potentialities, with 
the Association; and interpret to the churches the program 
resources and other assistance available for the Baptist State 
Convention and Southern Baptist Convention agencies. 

SECTION 1. RESPONSIBILITIES 

A. Planning and coordination 

1. Lead the Association in strategy planning; 
establishing and maintaining a long-range program. Lead the 
Association to set goals and encourage the churches to work 
toward them. 

2 . Coordinate the associational work and meetings by 
serving as ex-officio member of all committees. 

3. Work with program officers and the Nominating 
Committee in selecting and enlisting leaders for organizations 
and committees of the Association. 

4. Counsel, encourage, and lead in training the 
associational officers. 

B. Education and Promotion 

1. Seek to assist the pastors and the churches in 
programs suitable for their growth and development, recognizing 
the differences in size and diversity of membership, utilizing 
persuasion to promote fellowship and cooperation. 

2. Seek out in cooperation with the Missions Committee, 
places of mission needs and seek to enlist and appropriate 
churches t meet these needs. In the event no church (es) can been 
listed, upon the instructions of the Missions Committee, the 
Director of Missions may lead in such a program in the name of 
Stony Fork Baptist Association. 

3. Promote church organizational programs: Sunday 
School, Discipleship Training, Church Music, Brotherhood, WMU, 
and Vacation Bible School and Leadership Training. 

4. Promote church assistance programs: Evangelism, 
Stewardship and Family Life. 

5. Plan for and promote simultaneous efforts, such as: 
World Missions Conference, revival crusades, enlargement 
campaigns, training school, etc. 

6 . Prepare in cooperation with the Missions Committee 
an annual associational calendar. Prepare a monthly 



8 



associational newsletter for distribution in the Association. 

7 . Attend denominations meetings and conferences as 
budget and time considerations permit. 

8 . Report to the Executive Board at its regular 
meetings and to the Association in annual session. 
C. Service Ministry 

1. Provide counsel and help as requested by pastors and 

churches . 

2. Serve as pulpit supply, assist in church surveys, 
and conduct studies and revivals as requested in keeping with 
terms of employment, if he is an ordained minister. Pulpit 
supply for a period of 4 weeks. 

3. Manage the associational office, supervise 
associational employees, and maintain equipment of the 
Association. 

4. Cooperate with the Finance Committee in planning the 
budget and promoting giving to the Association. 

5. Establish and announce office hours to best utilize 
the division of time between the associational office and field 
responsibilities . 

6. Always working through the pastors, the Director of 
Missions will be available to offer aid to churches in need of 
assistance. No program will be conducted for a church without 
the invitation of the pastor and/or church. In the event the 
church is without a pastor, the Director of Missions will respond 
to request from the church leadership. 

SECTION 2 . Terms of Employment 

A. Term of Office - the Director of Missions shall be 
called for an indefinite term of service. 

B. Remuneration - will be recommended by the Missions 
and Finance Committees and approved by the Association. 

C. Honorariums - will be received for pulpit supply, 
weddings, funerals, revivals, and pastoral service, not directly 
related to his normal responsibilities; shall be considered 
personal remuneration. 

D. Work Schedule - schedules will vary, with weekends 
normally being kept for services in churches in the Association. 

E. Work Accountability - The Missions Committee 
pledges itself to a ministry of loyalty, support, and loving 
encouragement to the Director of Missions, so that under the 
leadership of the Spirit of God, he may render the most effective 
service possible. 

F. Both parties must give a thirty day notice before 
termination. 

SECTION 3. Qualifications 

A. Spiritual - a committed Christian with an sense of 
definite call to mission service. 

B. Educational - Preferably college and seminary 
degrees, or their equivalent. 

C. Special Knowledge and Skills - Knowledge of 
Baptist denominational life and willingness to continue to learn; 
vision, flexibility, and demonstrated leadership, ability in 
planning, conducting, and evaluating the work of the Association. 

D. Character - Christian integrity. 



9 



E. Experience - Pastoral ministry preferred, Christian 
education or associational and other mission experience are 
necessary. Preferably the associational experience should be as 
a Director of Missions, associational staff member, or as an 
active and responsible officer in the Association. The mission 
experience may be in the establishment of and involvement in 
mission outreach and ministry in a mission, church or 
association. 

ARTICLE III - Committees and Their Duties 

SECTION 1. The committee of Time, Place and Preacher shall 
be composed of three members. It shall be the duty of the 
committee to recommend to the Association, the churches where the 
next session will be held, preferably to be taken in alphabetical 
order, and also the preacher for the annual session. In order to 
alleviate any hardship on any one church hosting the 
associational meeting, it is suggested that two churches may 
jointly host each meeting. Expenses, meeting places, and other 
arrangements will be coordinated by the churches selected. 

SECTION 2. The Committee on Resolutions shall be composed 
of two members. It shall be the duty of this committee to draw 
and present to the Association suitable resolutions of 
appreciation and expressions of sentiments on any matter chosen 
by the committee or as directed by the messengers of the 
Association. 

SECTION 3. The Program Committee shall be composed of the 
general officers of the Association. It shall be the duty of 
this committee to prepare and present a suggested order of 
business to be adopted by the Association. When adopted, the 
program becomes the order of business unless changed by common 
consent or by the vote of the body. 

SECTION 4. The Committee of Nominations shall be composed 
of five members (pastors of each church) . It shall be the duty 
of the committee to prepare for the Association the names of 
individuals as nominees for the following officers and reports: 
Moderator, Vice-Moderator, Treasurer, Clerk, Sunday School 
Director, Discipleship Training Director, Music Director, 
Vacation Bible School Director, Brotherhood Director, Pianist, 
Evangelism Director, and Associational State Representatives, 
also persons for the following reports shall also be selected: 
Home Missions, State Missions, Foreign Missions, Stewardship, 
Cooperative Program, Obituaries, Temperance and Morals, VBS, WMU, 
Sunday School, and any others designated by the Association. 
Representatives for the following shall be selected: N.C. 
Baptist Hospital, N.C. Children's Homes, Baptist Home for the 
Aging, Denominational Colleges (Christian Higher Education), 
Denominational Literature, Annuity Board, Baptist Foundation, and 
any others designated by the Association. The Committee on 
Nominations shall be responsible for selecting and contacting 
each of these persons for their approval before the annual 
meeting. The floor shall be open for nominations for these 
officers on the day of the annual meeting. Nominations from the 
floor shall be taken first, then the Chairperson of the 
Nominating Committee shall give the nomination of the committee. 



10 



All nominees bust be contacted before and permission given for 
acceptance of nomination. The WMU will elect their officers. 

SECTION 5. The Finance Committee shall be composed of five 
members, one of which will include the Treasurer of the 
Association. It shall be the duty of this committee to prepare 
and recommend a budget for the Association and to suggest ways 
and means whereby the budget can be raised by the local churches 
and to secure the cooperation of the churches in raising the 
budget. The Finance Committee will present the proposed budget 
on the first day of the annual meeting with discussion and 
adoption scheduled for the second day. The Finance Committee 
shall meet prior to the quarterly Executive Committee meeting and 
shall prepare a regular form acceptable to the Association, a 
detailed financial report which shall be given to each member 
present at the quarterly meeting and the annual meeting. 

SECTION 6. The Missions Committee shall be composed of 
fiver members (pastors of each church) and this committee shall 
report to and cooperate with the Executive Committee of the 
Association. The duties of this committee are: (a) coordinate 
and help promote through the organizations and committees all 
phases and activities of the associational programs, (b) 
cooperate with the local churches in making surveys of areas 
which, in the opinion of the Missions Committee, are not being 
adequately served by the local missionary Baptist work, and to 
promote and develop these new phases of the missions programs, 
(c) serve in advisory capacity to the Director of Missions in all 
matters pertaining to his work and to serve with him in directing 
and promoting the missions programs of the Association, (d) 
provide information and assistance to the departments of State 
Missions of the N.C. Baptist Convention in meeting local 
missionary needs, such as missionary pastor's assistance, 
promoting mission causes, etc., (e) meet prior to the Executive 
Committee or at any time necessary to discharge its duties, (f) 
shall have the following responsibilities relating to the office 
of Director of Missions: 

1. Serve as a search committee for a Director of Missions. 

2 . Recommend to the Executive Committee the name of the 
nominee . 

3. Coordinate financial matters with the Baptist State 
Convention. 

4. Serve as a liaison between the churches and the Director 
of Missions. 

SECTION 7. The Constitution and By-Laws Committee shall be 
composed of the Missions Committee and one selected layperson of 
the Association, making six members. It shall be the duty of 
this committee to review and update the constitution and by-laws 
as it becomes necessary. This committee will recommend revisions 
and amendments concerning the constitution and by-laws to the 
Association as deemed necessary. They shall meet at least once a 
year before the annual meeting to review and discuss the 
constitution . 

SECTION 8. The Committee of Petitionary Letters and 
Constitutions of churches: 



11 



ARTICLE IX - Petitionary letters and constitution of churches 

The Committee of Petitionary Letters and Constitutions of 
the Churches shall be made up of the Missions Committee members. 

SECTION 1. Any group of baptized believers in Christ 
desiring to organize themselves into a missionary Baptist church 
with the purpose of seeking the recognition of, and fellowship 
and cooperate with this Association, shall be reguired to fulfill 
the following reguirements . They shall submit their reguest for 
admission to the Director of Missions or the Moderator, who will 
in turn forward it to the Committee of Petitionary Letters. In 
addition to the letter of reguest, a church must also furnish a 
report of work accomplished since its organization, a copy of the 
church covenant, and its articles of faith. 

SECTION 2. Any church seeking admission into the fellowship 
of the Association must be under the watchcare of the Association 
for a period of one year before it can be admitted. During this 
interim period, the church shall be expected to have part in the 
support of the causes fostered by the Association, the N.C. State 
Convention and the Southern Baptist Convention. 

SECTION 3. The findings f the Committee on Petitionary 
Letters shall be reported at the annual meeting or at the 
Executive Committee meeting with a recommendation either for or 
against admission. 

SECTION 4. If the church is accepted under the watchcare of 
the Association, the Committee on Petitionary Letters shall 
recommend at the end of the year that the church be accepted into 
full fellowship provided that examination of that years work done 
and a study of the cooperative spirit of that church proves to be 
in accordance to the principles of the churches of the 
Association. A two-thirds majority vote of the messengers or 
Executive Committee members present shall be needed for such an 
action to be completed. There will be an appropriate program 
conducted during the annual meeting to formally welcome this new 
church into the Association. 

SECTION 5. For a sister cooperative Missionary Baptist 
church that is affiliated with the Southern Baptist Convention, 
that wishes to join or transfer status, the same procedure is 
needful with the exception of the one year associational 
watchcare. Upon receipt of letter of reguest, the Committee of 
Petitions shall recommend its findings to the Executive 
Committee, and after a thirty day period of investigation, the 
discretion of the Executive Committee shall be used if immediate 
acceptance of fellowship is possible. If accepted, a program of 
welcoming shall be presented at the annual meeting. 

ARTICLE X - Amendments 

The constitution or any part of the constitution shall be 
amended at the annual meeting in August, with the acceptance by 
two-thirds majority vote. It is suggested that all changes and 
recommendations of amendments be submitted two months prior to 
the annual meeting, to the Constitution and By-Laws Committee for 
their careful consideration; however, any messenger has a right 



12 



to submit proposed changes in accordance with this article 

BY-LAWS 

1. All associational meetings shall be opened and closed in 
prayer. 

2. "Roberts Rules of Order" shall be used as guidelines 
for parliamentary procedure in all meetings. The Moderator will 
be responsible for having a copy of same at all meetings and a 
copy of parliamentary procedures and the gavel of the Association 
shall be transferred upon succession of the moderator. 

3. All associational officers shall exercise authority over 
their department and shall give a financial accounting to the 
Finance Committee for monies expended. 

4. Election and installation of officers shall take place 
on the last day of the annual meeting in August, and these 
officers shall be responsible for planning, coordinating, and 
providing leadership for the coming year in the Association. 

AMENDMENTS TO THE CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS 

Time, Place and Preacher Committee will be amended to the 
hosting church pastor or a preacher of his choice will be the 
preacher for the associational meetings. Committee membership 
will be filled according to the number of people participating in 
the associational work. 

Article VIII - Committees and their duties, Section 4 - 
amended to: recommendations from the Nominating Committee shall 
be presented first, then nominations will be taken from the 
floor. 



13 



REPORTS 



VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL 

Vacation Bible School ( VBS ) is always an exciting time 
for chi Idren ( and adults) and workers zts they meet together 
for a time of Bible study and activities. Fun, isn't it? 
Exhausting, isn't it? Worth it, isn't it? Yes, Yes, Yes. 
P>-oba.bly by now yc^u've already been through this. If your 
church has not yet conducted si VEiS , I do hope you will make 
an effoi't to set aside a time (tiiis could be a weekend or am 
all day session) to do so. 

This year our Associational VBS Teairi attended the state 
clinic at Hickory. We also held the associational clinic 
at Rock Spring Baptist Church for workers in oiar churches. 
Those serving on our teani x-^ere'- B^strbara West-— F'reschool ; 
Eunice Luttrel 1 - -Chi idren ; Mamie Craig-"Youth ; Linda Hills - - 
Adult. My thanks to these who so willingly gave of their 
time to work with me. Thanks to all of you in our churches 
vdio h^ive helped to create lasting memories in the lives of 
the children and youth you have worked with, for learning 
about oux" Lord is the most important tliing we can help them 
with . 

Blespectf ul ly submitted , 
Edith Gryder, Assoc. VBS Dir. 



14 



Introduction 



to Your Guide to International Missions 

A young student enrolling in a state university in Morocco declares to a Southern Baptist that he is 
"dejQnitely" a Muslim. Fourteen months later, he asks in earnest, "What do I have to do to be a 
Christian?" 

In Brazil, a teen-ager with a disability crawls to a Baptist church because he is curious about the U.S. 
volunteers working there. Their testimony leads him to Jesus. 

These are but two examples taken from field reports contained in this guide to Southern Baptist 
missions. One is from a country where the teachings of Islam have kept the vast majority of people 
blind to the compassion of God in Christ. The other is from a region where evangelical numbers are 
rapidly expanding as individuals accept unmediated freedom to relate to their Savior. Together they 
represent the breadth of God's activities through Southern Baptists as record numbers of both 
missionaries and short-term personnel, buoyed by aggressive prayer and financial support, have 
labored together to bring a lost world to salvation. 

When added together, the results during the middle years of the 1990s have been amazing: 300,000 
baptisms achieved for the first time in 1994; more than 2,600 churches started the following year (a 
figure up 70 percent since the beginning of the decade); an aggregate worldwide membership that 
passed 4 million in 1995. Combined with evidence of a reinvigorated support of missions in the 
United States, such results are being celebrated not only in their own right but as evidence of greater 
things that God will do through Southern Baptists in the near fiiture. 

Much of the excitement has been stirred by efforts of a new missions leadership team, led by President 
Jerry Rankin, to prepare Southern Baptists to be effective leaders among Great Commission groups 
as we enter the next millenium. 

Philosophically, the new administration has committed to becoming a channel through which all 
Southern Baptists can fiiLfill their own missions calling as the turn of the century approaches. This 
ambition underpinned a new mission statement, adopted by Foreign Mission Board trustees in 
December 1994: "We will lead Southern Baptists to be on mission with God to bring all the peoples 
of the world to saving faith in Jesus Christ." 

To fijLfill that ideal, several programs were started or strengthened to enable expanded missions 
involvement by U.S. missions supporters. For those called to prayer, PraverLine . a toll-free telephone 
service, provided up-to-date prayer needs from the fields. By 1996 it was receiving more than 
230,000 calls per year. A complementary on-line prayer network, CompassionNet ®. also was 
launched, giving computer users instantaneous access to pressing missionary needs. 

Although gifts to the Lottie Moon Christmas Offering and the Southern Baptist Convention's 
Cooperative Program remain the primary funding sources for international missions activities, more 
ways for individuals and churches to personalize their giving are being offered through the board's 
development office and through special development councils set up in key Southern Baptist 
population centers. 

In addition, the board continues to recognize the ministry potential of volunteers, joining in projects 
http://www.imb.org/resources/yourguide/intro.htm 7/31/98 



15 



Your Guide - Introduction 

that saw as many as 15,000 per year serve during the middle 1990s. Volunteer leaders were 
projecting this number to double in the near future. Key partnership agreements between the board 
and both the Woman's Missionary Union and the Brotherhood Commission were entered to facilitate 
their involvement. Board administrators also have assigned career personnel with the specific function 
of helping coordinate volunteer arrangements and ministries in key regions of the world. 

While the philosophy of the new administration seeks to involve more Southern Baptists in the 
overseas missions endeavor, the strategy of board leaders has been refined to direct resources along a 
primarily dual tract: one is labeled the "harvest fields," those areas where God is moving in mighty 
ways in bringing individuals to Him; the other is labeled The Last Frontier, referring to people groups 
in which the majority have little, or no, access to the gospel of Jesus Christ. Methodology for 
reaching peoples of the Last Frontier has been pioneered by Southern Baptists serving under the 
board's humanitarian-aid organization Cooperative Services International (CSI). Although field 
reports of these representatives cannot be published here due to the cultural and political sensitivities 
involved, 367 of the new churches started in 1995 were among these peoples. One people group, v/ith 
only 65 known believers a few years ago, now has more than 200,000. 

This combination of new philosophy and strategy promises to impact Southern Baptist missions 
efforts in the coming years. One change involved the name of the Foreign Mission Board, in June 
1997, it became the International Mission Board (1MB), signifying on one hand the international 
scope of the Southern Baptist missions vision while on the other hand correcting a semantic obstacle 
that in recent years has generated hostility in some quarters of the world where ministries are 
undertaken through the 1MB. Another change in progress involves a focus away from ministries to 
nations in favor of ministries to people groups when assigning resources. This strategy has proven 
highly effective, even within the harvest areas. 

These new directions already are being reflected in the field accounts contained in this report. As you 
read, you will learn about how, in Belarus, a small group of Baptists went to a lake resort where they 
planned to baptize eight fellow believers and wound up, as a result of their short evangelistic service, 
seeing more than 150 of the 2,000 people there profess Christ on the spot; you will see how relief 
efforts in Haiti assisted nearly 50,000 people and paved the way for witness to the compassion of a 
Christian people. In short, you will become informed about a multitude of ways that God is using 
Southern Baptists to bring people to Him in all comers of the world. 

You also v^U become informed about local economic, cultural and political realities that are impacting 
the ability of people to respond to the Christian message. We hope this information will lead you to 
praise God for both the cumulative and the individual victories won; for the safety of Southern 
Baptist personnel in tense situations; for the ongoing advance of the gospel in accordance with God's 
plan outlined in the Great Commission of Jesus. Further we hope that these reports will lead you to 
consider how you can take an increasingly active part in supporting these efforts through your 
prayers, your gifts and your going as the International Mission Board leads Southern Baptists in 
joining God's vision for missions in the 21st century. 



http://www.imb . org/resources/yourguide/intro . htm 

16 



7/31/98 



STEWARDSHIP AND THE COOPERATIVE PROGRAM 



There is one thing we know for sure, we cannot out give God. His 
blessings are innumerable but He expects us to be good Stewards of 
those blessings. Here are 6 blessings of giving: 

1. It gives us the fulfillment that comes from responding to God's 
call . 

2. It widens our world and we learn to care about people beyond 
our circle. 

3 . It teaches us how to pray because we encounter situations we 
cannot handle alone. 

4. It brings lasting friendships and real fellowship when we work 
with fellow Christians on a project that has been ordained by God. 

5 . It matures our character because if we are seeking the ways of 
God we will be growing in love, knowledge and righteousness. 

6. It helps us to know God's word and to incorporate it into our 
lives when we learn what the Bible says about giving and sharing 
the Good News. 

Now, how does all this tie in with the Cooperative Program? 
Because the Cooperative Program is the best way for us to be good 
stewards. The CP was established in 1925 to replace many different 
societies which represented specific causes. It is one central 
plan that allows churches to pool their resources in a united 
effort to fund missions. Through it we are partners with 40 
Baptist state conventions, we support almost 5,000 missionaries 
through the North American Mission Board by giving to the 
Cooperative Program and Annie Armstrong Easter Offering. The NAMB 
also supports 2,500 chaplains, 82,000 volunteers, provides 
resources for missions education and coordinates multistate 
disaster relief response. 

Through the Cooperative Program and the Lottie Moon Christmas 
Offering, we support International Missions and 4,447 foreign 
missionaries. For the first time since 1981, Southern Baptist 
surpassed their goal for the 1997 Lottie Moon offering giving 
$100,064,318, seven million more than given the previous year. 

If you take the Great Commission seriously, believe that all people 
deserve a chance to hear the gospel, want to move beyond business 
as ususal, want to link hearts and hands with those who are 
focusing on the unreached, and want personal involvement in 
completing our Lord's mandate, then urge your church to increase 
their giving to the Cooperative Program. 

I would like to congragulate Stony Fork Association on its giving 
to the missions mentioned in this report and all the other missions 
out churches are involved in. When we met to work on the budget we 



17 



we were made aware of just how much our few churches manage to give each year for the Lord's 
work in our area, in our state, in our nation and throughout the world. God has truly blessed us 
and it is our responsibility to be the good stewards He expects us to be with these blessings. 

I would encourage each of you to search your hearts and souls because perhaps God is calling 
you to be more involved in His Great Commission than you already are. 



18 



STONY FORK ASSOCIATION 
COOPERATIVE PROGRAM 
AND 

STEWARDSHIP REPORT 



CHURCH 

Bailey's Camp 
Doe Ridge 
Laytown 
Mt . Eptiraim 
Rock Spring 
Sandy Flat 
TOTAL 



1996-97 

1,033.00 
337.00 
-0- 
-0- 
6,355.00 
341.00 
$8,066.00 



1997-98 

2,658.00 
370.00 
-0- 
-0- 
7,588.00 
397.00 
$11,013.00 



This represents an increase of $2,947.00 in giving to the Cooperative Program, 



19 



^CEUEBRATE baptist state convention of north CAROLINA 



^ JESUS EVANGELISM 




MILTON A. HOLLIFIELD, JR. NELSON SEARCY 
Division Director, Ext. 452 Personal Evangelism. Ext. 450 



)ate: 



July 15, 1997 



lemo to: 



North Carolina Baptist Church and Association Leaders 



lemo from: Milton A. Hollifield, Jr. 

lemo subject: Preparation for Celebrate Jesus 2000 

r ^ 

is you are aware, we are soon approaching the beginning of a new millennium. Historically, some great 
piritual accomplishments have occurred during such times. Whether or not all the world will recognize it, 
lis calendar change is a reminder of the importance of God's entrance into this world through His Son, 
esus Christ. We are standing on the threshold of an unprecedented time, one of our finest moments of 
opportunity. Numerous evangelical denominations are working in a massive cooperative effort called 
lission America 2000. The goal is to pray for and communicate the Gospel to all residents of North 
^erica by year end 2000. The principal thrust of this evangelism strategy will occur in 1999 and 2000. 
'he North American Mission Board recently sent a CELEBRATE JESUS 2000 CHURCH 
'ARTICIPATION manual to each of our N.C. Baptist churches. This new manual presents time line 
chedules to aid in the implementation of this strategy. 

/lany church leaders appreciate the opportunity of choices in developing strategies to reach their goals. I 
elieve the leadership in our churches want to reach people in their communities with the Gospel. Some 
lave developed their own method of doing this while others enjoy being a part of a statewide or national 
trategy. The most unportant thing is that we do something. We are providing training events for those 
iaptist Associations and churches who want to learn more about the strategy called Celebrate Jesus 2000. 
'or those who wish to do something different, the Evangelism Division will gladly assist you in formulating 
our own plan if you desire our help. 

rive initial CJ 2000 area wide training events will be conducted across our state September 21-25, 
.998. 1 have tried to locate these events within a 2 hour driving distance for most people. A former N.C. 
esident, Toby Frost, from NAMB, was very instrumental in the development of CJ 2000 and he v^ll be 
mr guest conference leader for these training sessions. Rev. Frost has also done much work in the design 
ind promotion of the EvangeUstic Block Party and other special evangelistic events. More recently, Toby 
las done much work in designing and launching the Kansas City based Mapping Center For Evangelism 
vhich is a remarkable computer program available to churches for pinpointing prospects in your 
;ommunity. Training for this is also available through this Evangelism Division. 

f you are interested in learning more about how your church can participate and benefit from the CJ 2000 
;vangelism strategy, attend on of the training events in September. The time will be 10:00 a.m. to 12:30 
).m. in each location. These sessions are open to everyone. Pastors are encouraged to bring their church 
Jvangelism committee members. Reservations are not required, but bring the manual you received via mail. 



RO. BOX 1107/250 CONVENTION DRIVE. GARY. NC 27512-1107 • (800) 395-5102 • FAX (919) 469-1674 

20 




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21 



1998 SOUL- 
.WINNING , 
/ COMMITMENT DAY 



CELEBRATEJESUS... 

GOING, 
WEEPING. 
SOWING, 
REAPING 

" ' Psaim 126:S-6 

■ " i ! . '■ ' ■ \ ■' ' I .' ' 

iMion B«nl. SBC 01A2M 



t's get ready to Celebrate Jesus in a way that would really please Him. Christ's Great Commission calls on 
iristians to share the gospel and make disciples of all nations. It includes every resident of North America and the 
)rid. He definitely intended for His followers to carry this out. Southern Baptists and other evangelical Christians 
ive made this their goal between now and the end of the year 2000. 

)w we are less than two and one half years from the beginning of the new millennium, and "Celebrate Jesus 2000" 
IS been adopted by the SBC as our theme (some state conventions are using other themes to accomplish the same 
lals). Whatever the theme, we are all together with the intention to reach out to every person in North America 
rough prayer, personal witness, proclamation and preservation; The major launch of Celebrate Jesus 2000 is set 
r January, 1999. But we can't wait until then to get ready. Soul-Winning Commitment Day, 1998, can be just the 
)ht occasion to get your church on track for the launch of Celebrate Jesus 2000. 

ie date suggested for SWCD on the SBC calendar is the first Sunday of October. Some churches may want to use 
Dv. 1st or another Sunday. In July, every SBC church will receive two 1998 Soul-Winning Commitment Day 
ickets, one for the Pastor and another for the Sunday School Director or Minister of Education. Please doni file this 
vay until October. It has kjeas and helps to get you started leading your church to be ready for the awesome 
)portunity that will be ours If He has not returned t)efore the new millennium begins. August and September are 
iportant months of preparation, and this material can save you time and money as you prepare. Three standard 
atures of SWCD will be included in the packet: (1) ideas for the morning SWCD service, at which time 
dividual commitment can be called for, (2) the evening of SWCD, which can be an evangelism launch 
irvice or rally, calling for commitment to the church's evangelism strategy for the year, and (3) "Great Day 
The Morning!" an evangelistic Sunday School and Worship High Attendance and Enrollment Campaign, 
isigned to bring many lost people to a great harvest service on the last Sunday of October. The contents of 
e 1998 SWCD Packet will be on the internet, downloadable from this website: http://www.thegoodnews.org. 



SUNDAY SCHOOL HIGH ATTENDANCE/SOUL WINNING COMMITMENT DAY 
i SUGGESTED DATE -OCTOBER 4, 1998 



22 



1998 Evangelism Division Events 



August 



September 



October 



14-15 
28-30 

21-25 

21 

22 

23 

24 

25 

2-3 
4 

26-30 



November 20-22 



December 3 1 



January 11-12 

'21-22' 



March 
April 

r. 

May 
June 

June 
July 

August 



19-20 



16-17 

y 16 



BLWF Annual Meeting - Caraway Conference Center ^ 
CWT Seminar - Patterson Springs - Shelby (revised model) 

Celebrate Jesus 2000 Area-wide Trdning Events 
Buncombe Baptist Resource Center, Asheville 
First Baptist Chiirch, Clemmons ^' ' ' ' 
Baptist Building, Cary 
West End Church, Williamston 

Warsaw Baptist Church, Warsaw ' . ^ 

Conf. on Prayer for Spiritual Awakening & Evangelism - FBC, Kings Mountain 
Soul Winning Commitment Day - "Going Weeping, Sowing Reaping** 
BSSB "Faith" Evangelism Training - Hiclcory Grove - Charlotte 

Fall Youth Evangelism Retreat - Caswell 

"Exciting Alternative** New Year's Eve Retreat - Caraway 

Tentative Dates for 1999 Evangelism Division Events 

State Evangelism Conference - Calvary Baptist, Winston-Salem 

Vocational Evangelists Conf. - Caraway 

National Conference on Prayer "Great Commission Praying** i , 

with Henry Blackaby - Pleasant Garden, Greensboro area 

Interfaith Witness Seminar - Caraway > " ' - v 
Church Orientation - WITNESS/EVANGELS - Caraway 



31 -June 4 Youth Evangelism Week I - Caswell 



.1 I 



4-6 
18-19 
21-26 
28-July3 

27-28 
2^-30 

2-7 
20-21 



October 3 

' • 18-19 

November 19-21 

December 3 1 



Single Adult Evangelism Conference - Caswell , 
Lay Renewal Gathering 

Youth Evangelism Week II- Caswell ( ^ ^ 

Youth Evangelism Week III- Caswell 

Operation Yahweh - Charlotte Area ' ' ' 
SUPER SUMMER '99 - Carowinds 

Youth Evangelism Week IV - Caswell 
BLWF Annual Meeting 

Soul Winning Commitment Day 
Innovative Precepts for Church Growth Summit TBA 

Fall Youth Evangelism Retreat - Caswell 

"Exciting Alternative" New Year's Eve Retreat - Caraway 



23 



STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

ilnnual Financial Report 
Aug. 7, 1998 

Balance August 1, 1997 $ 7364.89 

Contributions from chui-ches for year: 



- - Ba i 1 ey ' s C amp $ 1130.00 

--Doe Ridge 985.00 

- - Lay town 5876. 55 

■ - - Mt . Ephr i am 3070.28 

--Rock Spring 3543.42 

--Sandy Flat 1841.85 
Other: 

- - N . C . St ate Convent i on 168.4 5 

Total Coxitributions : $16615.55 +16615 



$23970 4 4 



Expenditures : 

--Linda Mills (Clerk Honorarium) $ 250.00 

--Edith Gryder ( Treas . Honorarium ) 250.00 

Precision Printing (Minutes) 218.73 

--WMU 201.56 

--Roy Gryder ( D.O.M. expense) 618.33 

--VBS materials 197.60 

--Flowers (Mr.Eurgett funeral) 55.00 

--Shipping charge foz- coats 28.00 

--Mexico Mission 140 00 . 00 

Total expenditures: 15817.27 -158 17 . 27 

Total in Treasure 8/1/98: 



An additional $1615.90 was given to reimburse Laytown 
Baptist Church for some of their Mexico Mission Expense. 



Fiespectf ully submitted , 
Edith Gryder 



24 



Facts about NAMB 




W'lQ Am 



GENERAL LINKS 

NAMB Home Page 



interesting Facts about NAMB 



Created as an SBC agency in 1997 by combining three former agencies 
(Brotherhood Commission, Radio and Television Commission, and 
Home Mission Board). 

Assist SBC churches in reaching the United States, Canada, the 
Caribbean, Guam, and American Samoa for Christ, primarily through 
evangelism and starting churches. See Ministrv Assignments for more 
details. 



Partners with 40 Baptist state conventions/fellowships to support almost 
5,000 missionaries in the United States, Canada, the Caribbean, Guam, 
and American Samoa. 




Annual budget of more than $90 million from SBC Cooperative 
Program and the Annie Armstrong Easter Offering. 




From studios in Fort Worth, NAMB produces five weekly radio 
programs aired on 2,600 radio stations, and daily and weekly TV 
programs carried on two networks -ACTS and FamilyNet - reaching a 
potential global audience of more than 700 million people. 

• 2,500 SBC-endorsed chaplains. 

• 82,000 volunteers, including 2,200 two-year Mission Service 
Corps volunteers. 

• Provides resources for missions education. 

• Coordinates multistate disaster relief response. ' 



http ://www.namb. net/facts, htm 



25 



7/31/98 



^ r'he problems in today's world can be overwhelming. 

J_ It's easy to believe that the problems are just too great 
and one individual is too small to make a difference. 

Yet throughout Jesus' ministry He taught His disciples 
how something apparently small can make a big difference. 

■ A mustard seed, the smallest of all seeds, grows into a 
large tree. Birds make a home in the tree's branches. 
(Matthew 13:32) 



A small bit of yeast is essential to making a loaf of 
bread. (Matthew 13:33) 

A boy's lunch of five loaves of bread and two fish 
fed a crowd of five thousand people. (John 6:9-13) 



When you give to the North Carolina Missions Offering, 
your gift is combined with those of others across the state. 
Together with God's blessing, these giftrs can accomplish 
something great for His Kingdom. Whether you are old or 
young, an adult or a child, you can make a difference. 

You can learn more about how your gifts will make a 
difference for Jesus Christ by reading the following articles. 
To make a contribution to the North Carolina Missions 
Offering, contact your church or the Baptist State Conven- 
tion at 1-800-395-5102. 

Make A Oifferev^ce 

\i''r itde Is Much: Make A Difference" is this year's theme 
- ' >for the North Carolina Missions Offering. In the fol- 
lowing scripture passages, God uses something small to make 
a big difference for His Kingdom. While reading these pas- 
sages, remember that today He is still able to use our gifts for 
His great purposes. 

■ At that time, the disciples came to Jesus, asking, "Who is 
the greatest in the Kingdom of heaven?" So Jesus called a 
child, had him stand in front of them, and said, "I assure 
you that unless you change and become like children 
you will never enter the IGngdom of heaven. The 
greatest in the Kingdom is the one who humbles 
himself and becomes like this child." 
(Matthew 18:1-4) 

■ Jesus told them another parable: 
"The Kingdom of heaven is like this. 
A man takes a mustard seed and sows it in his 

field. It is the smallest of all 
seeds, but when it grows up, 
it is the biggest of all plants 
It becomes a tree, so that 
birds come and make their 
nests in its branches." 
(Matdiew 13:31-32) 




■ Jesus told them still another parable: "The Kingdom of 
heaven is like this. A woman takes some yea."^": and mixes it 
with a bushel of flour until the whole batcli of dough rises." 

(Matthew 13:33) | 
I The widow . . . went to Elisha and said, "Sir, my 

husband has died! ... A man he owed money to has 
I come to take away my two sons as slaves in payment 
' for my husband's debt." 

i He asked. "... What do you have at home?" 

"Nothing at all, except a small jar of olive oil," she 
answered. 

"Go to your neighbors and borrow as many empty 
jars as you can," Elisha told hen "... Start pouring 
oil into the jars. Set each one aside as soon as it is full." 
So the woman . . . took the small jar of olive oil and 
poured oil into the jars . . . When they had filled all the 
jars, ... the olive oil stopped flowing. She went back to 
Elisha, the prophet, who said to her, "Sell the olive oil and 
pay all your debts, and there will be enough money left for 
you and your sons to live on." (2 Kings 4:1-7) 

■ Elijah . . . saw a widow . . . "Please bring me a drink 
of water," he said to her . . . "And please bring me ^ 
some bread, too." J- 

She answered, "... All I have is a handful of - 
flour in a bowl and a bit of ^ 
olive oil in a jar." 

. . . Elijah said 
to her, "... Make 
a small loaf from 
what you have and 
bring it to me, and then 
prepare the rest for you and 

your son. For this is what the Lord, the God of Israel, says: 
The bowl will not run out of flour or the jar run out of oil 
before the day that I, the Lord, send rain." 

The widow went and did as Elijah had told her, and all of 
them had enough food for many days. (1 Kings 17:10-15) 
As Jesus sat near the temple treasury, he 
watched the people as they dropped in their 
money. Many rich men dropped in a lot of 
money; then a poor widow came along and 
dropped in two litde copper coins worth 
about a penny. He called his disciples together 
and said to them, "I tell you that this poor widow 
put more in the offering box than all the others. For 
the others put in what they had to spare of 
their riches; but she, poor as she is, put in all 
she had — she gave all she had to live on." 
(Mark 12:41-44) 
■ Andrew . . . said, "There is a boy here who has 
five loaves of barley bread and two fish." 

Jesus took the bread, gave thanks to God, and distributed 
it to the people who were sitting there. He did the same with 






27 



the fish, and :hey all had as much 
as they wanted." (John 6:8-14) 
■ Give to others, and God will - 
give to you. Indeed, /ou will ^ 
receive a full measure, a gen- 
erous helping, poured into ' ' •• 

your hands — all that you can hold. The measure you use 
for others is the one that God will use for you. (Luke 6:38) 

CWildKood E%per;ev>cej Imfluemce 
Career MijJioin^r^ 

vy^^yhile growing up in Raleigh, Kaye Morrison began 
\A/ learning about missions at an early age. 

"My mother has said that every time a missionary spoke at 
church I had to be there," she recalls. 

A member of New Hope church, she also participated in 
a week-long GA camp at Umstead Park. "It was a wonderfld 
week," she remembers. "The leaders really cared for us." 

Kaye now serves as a missionary to Africa's Ivory Coast. 
She and her husband are church planters. "I believe these 
early experiences were preparing me for my call into full-time 
Christian service," she said. 

Her children have carried on the family's tradition of 
missions involvement. As a college student at Campbell, 
Angela, now 24, worked at Mundo Vista for several summers. 
Jeff, a freshman at Campbell, will be a counselor at Camp 
Caraway this year. 

Through your gift: to the North Carolina Missions Offering, 
you can make a difference by providing opportimities for 
children to learn about 
missions. 



/imge! HigV>+5 Tra^jfort ^v^fav^f Need- 
ing Medkal Care 

^ ^. ^ ^\ nthony suffers from a disease that causes tumors to 
* ^ . jf j. grow on his right eye. At the age of 11 months, he 
* has already made nine trips from his home in Florida to 
see medical specialists in Philadelphia who can treat him. 





Kaye Morrison, 

missionary to Africds Ivory Coast, has 
collected many artifacts in her 14 years there. 



Gary Wilser is a volunteer and regional coordinator for the NC Baptist Men s Aviation Ministry. 

Many of these trips would not have been possible without 
the help of the North Carolina Baptist Men's Aviation Ministry. 
Anthony's family cannot afford the cost of his medical care and 
the frequent commercial flights to Philadelphia. 

More than 100 volunteers across the state provide "Angel 
Flights" to people in need. These volunteers use their interest 
and skills in flying to help people in Jesus' name. 

"I have always been interested in flying, even from the 
time I was just a boy," said Bob Foy, state coordinator of the 
aviation ministry who has been a private pilot for about 
18 years. "What better way to use that interest than to tell 
others about the love of Jesus?" 

"You guys are a gift from God," said Mrs. Anderson, 
Anthony's mother, referring to Foy and his volunteer co- 
pilot Gene Branson. "If it weren't for you, we would not 
be able to receive the medical help Anthony so desperately 
needs." 

"I love to fly but without a good reason to, I just couldn't 
afford it," said Foy. "I now have a good reason to fly!" 

The North Carolina Missions Offering supports the 
ministries of North Carolina Baptist Men, including the Avi- 
ation Ministry. 

Nor+V> Carol;»>a: A Field for Lainguage 

John Jones spent the first 15 years of his life in Ecuador, 
the son of missionaries in that country. He grew up 
speaking Spanish as well as English. When he returned to 
North Carolina, he worked in the Yadkin Association as a 
summer missionary to migrant workers. 

This experience was the beginning of a career in language 



28 




John Jones reviews 
language materials, 
such as this 
Hispanic penodicaL 
in his role as 
director of language 
ministrtes for 
North Carolina 



ministries, right in North CaroUna. 
"I always thought I would return to the mission field in 
Ecuador," Jones said. But as he worked with Hispanic people 
in our state, Jones saw the needs that existed here at home. 
"At that time, non-English language ministries were just 
getting started. I saw the opportunity and felt God was 
leading me to stay here in North Carolina." 

As a language pastor with the Home Mission Board 
(now the North American Mission Board) for many years, 
Jones started Hispanic churches across the state. Today, as 
the director of language ministries for the Baptist State Con- 
vention of North Carolina, he oversees more than 100 non- 
English language churches. "The number of North Carolina 
residents whose primary language is not English is growing," 
said Jones. "We still have a vast mission field right here in 
our own state." 

Associational summer missionaries and other language 
missions programs are supported by gifts to the North Car- 
olina Missions Offering. 

Your Dollarj Make A Difference 

"^p-N o you think you are too small or that you could never 
J V give enough to make a difference? Here are a few ways 
your gift to the North Carolina Missions Offering can make 
a difference: 

■ $3.50 provides a hot meal to a disaster victim. 

■ $5 supplies a language Bible for a non-English speaking 



North Carolina resident. 

$10 helps fiimish crafb and Bible session materials for 
the annual Happiness Retreats for persons with mental 
handicaps. 

$15 pays program fees for a training event for 
associational WMU leadership. 
$20 provides the Biblical Recorder on cassette tape 
for blind/visually impaired readers for one year. 
$30 supports a seminary extension scholarship for 
a prison inmate. 

$35 provides a gift to a missionary child in college 
at Christmas time. 

$50 supplies two soccer balls for an overseas sports 
mission team. 

$50 pays for special training for a language group 

starting missions organizations in its church. 

$100 provides a Christian camping experience for 

a child from less fortunate circumstances. 

$ 1 50 pays for a workshop leader to train tutors in 

one of three literacy mission areas. 

$300 supplies a supplement to an associational 

Mother/Daughter retreat. 

$500 provides one month's suppon for a full-time 
language pastor. 

$600 furnishes a hymn player for a language congregation, 



1 



Ula>/j You Ca»> Helf 

■ f rere are five ways yc 
^r~J_Missions Offering: 



f rere are five ways you can support the North Carolina 

rli 



1 . Pray for the work of the ministries made possible by 
the North Carolina Missions Offering. 

2. Pray for the North Carolina Missions Offering emphasis 
in your church. 

3. Invite a speaker to give a testimony at your church. Call 
your association or the state convention office for the 
names of those who have witnessed North Carolina 
missions making a difference in their own life or the 
lives of others. 

Give your time to support a projea or program which 
is supported by the North Carolina Missions Offering. 
Make a financial donation to the offerine 



1 ^ 



T' -1 





VIeeV of fra^er for NorfK CaroI;»»a Mljjlo^j 

6-oal: $1.1 r^;|l;o»> • Sugsej+eJ Da+ej: Sept. 13-10 

Twe NC Mi«io»<j Offer;»»g Jupfortf fV>e /^Ijjlow /-^Jrlj+riej of +V<e ^affi^f $fa+e (Co»»vew+;ow of Nor+K Carol;»>a. 



29 



66 

The North Carolina Missions Offering 

in the 

Stony Fork Association 

Most of the North Carolina Missions Offering supports projects in the 80 
associations (covering aR 100 counties) across North Carolina. Many North 
Carolina Missions Offering projects are actually association/state missions 
programs receiving money and leadership support from both the Baptist 
State Convention and local associations. 

For example, the Stony Fork Association received approximately 10 percent 
of the 1997 special offering collected in the association. Last year (1997), 
$168.45 of the $1,796.02 collected from 3 of the association's 7 churches and 
missions (Hsted below) was sent back to the association. 

In 1997, the North CaroUna Missions Offering also supported NC Woman's 
Missionary Union, NC Baptist Men (Brotherhood), and many of the Missions 
Division's vital ministries. The number of individuals in the Stony Fork 
Association who participated in these groups in 1997 includes: 

3 Girls to GA & Acteens Camp at Mundo Vista 
1 Person to NC WMU Resource Team 

Churches giving to the 1997 special offering: 
STONY FORK 

Laytown 
Mount Ephriam 
Sandy Flat 



Note: Information supplied by participating areas of work. 



30 



BAPTIST CHILDREN'S HOMES 



Each year Baptist Children's Homes of North Carolina serve more than 1,500 children and their families 
by helping them to identily and overcome the problems that threaten to tear them apart. 

Baptist Children's Homes provide food, clothing, shelter, education and spiritual guidance to the 
children residing there.. 

The Children's Homes receive about one fourth of their income from North Carolina Baptist Churches. 
For Further support, they depend on the gifts of individuals, foimdations, corporations and payment for 
some services. Gifts through estate planning provide significant help. 

These homes do a work worthy of ouir support. We should all want to be a part of this work. 



31 



Baptist Children's Homes ofNC 1998 Book of Reports 



Her voice steady and quiet, 
Christy delivers her personal 
story like a letter dropped into 
an anonymous mailbox at a 
shuttered house on a nameless 
street. 

Her grandparents' murder had unleashed 
memories of her own abuse. Family members 
encouraged her to leave her home and repeatedly 
told her she was worthless. 

"I've had a rough life," she says. "I've been 
through about anything I can possibly go through." 

Christy admits carrying a short fuse and 
outbursts, physical abuse and a dangerous living 
situation brought her to Mills Home in November 
1997. 

She continues her quiet story about coming 
to Mills Home, about doing well in school, and 
tutoring two residents in Alumni Cottage. She's glad 
she can help, because "learning comes easy to me, 
and I want to help someone if I can." 

Julie, her first child care worker at Mills 
Home, became a real friend who "helped me turn 
my life around," Christy says, her face at last begin- 
ning to brighten. "She was there for me when I 
needed somebody. My parents weren't there. No- 
body wanted me. It was fun being around Julie. She 
showed me she cared about me and that I could be 
loved." 

She Didn't Plan to See 16 

Julie couldn't realize how important her 
friendship was, or how close Christy came to giving 
up. Christy admits to two suicide attempts, and 
believed she would never see age 16. 

"I used to dread getting up," she said. "I 
didn't know if I would get my mouth busted or my 
arm broke." 

Even now, there are days Christy doesn't 
want to get out of bed. But she does, and she goes to 
school and earns mostly "A"s and stars on the 
varsity basketball team, and tutors other residents in 
math, and went to New York for a summer basket- 
ball tournament and is planning to attend college to 
study a helping profession. 

Now she is planning to live, not planning to 
die. BCH is giving her opportunities to live for. 

Christy's story is repeated hundreds of times 
each year at BCH. Not all are as dramatic but every 
one tells of a young person and a family at the end of 
an unraveling rope. 



Sybil Stewart, Trustee Chair 
Michael C. Blackwell, President 

At four residential campuses, two homes for 
behaviorally troubled girls, a maternity home, a 
home for teenage mothers and their babies, thera- 
peutic camping and model day care, 1,560 young 
people found help in troubled times last year. 

During the past year BCH received $1.6 
million through the Cooperative Program, and 
$752,000 through the Thanksgiving Offering. Total 
church gifts of $3.3 million comprised 18 percent of 
the nearly $18 million in revenue. Because of a 
positive investment environment, BCH investments 
of endowment funds provided 33 percent of revenue. 

Buildings Dedicated 

Two major priorities of the $10.1 million 
"Light Their Way" Campaign were dedicated: The 
Winifred Lindsay Education/ Administrative Center 
at Odum Home in Pembroke on Jan. 20, and the John 
D. and Amelia W. Johnson Cottage at Mills Home on 
May 12. 

U.S. Congressman Mike Mclntyre, co-chair 
of the Congressional Task Force for Responsible 
Fatherhood, spoke at the dedication of the Lindsay 
Center. He said BCH has the "purpose, people and 
passion" to successfully help children and families 
turn their lives around." 

"When we reach out to our children we're 
making the best investment for tomorrow we could 
ever make for our country," he said. 

Winifred Lee Herbert Lindsay, for whom the 
Lindsay Center is named, died Nov. 21, 1997. 

Primary funds for building Johnson Cottage 
were given by Phil and Sharon Drake, of Franklin, in 
memory of Sharon's father and in honor of her 
mother, a BCH trustee. 

"God has given me more than I deserve," 
Drake said in a brief, emotional address at the 
dedication. He said giving money to build the 
cottage was the "easy part" compared to the cottage 
worker's task of making a difference in children's 
lives. 

Michael C. Blackwell celebrated his 15th 
anniversary as president of BCH on July 1, 1998. 

The video, "A Long Walk Home" is available 
to promote the 1998 Thanksgiving Offering, which 
has a statewide goal of $800,000, the largest ever. 

Wherever children are hurting and families 
are strained, BCH strives to heal. To secure a video, 
or a speaker for your church or civic group, or to 
access services, call (800) 476-3669. 



32 






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-3/1 



Today there are over thirty million people aged sixty-five and 
above in the United states, representing almost twelve percent of 
our population. Every fifteen seconds another person reaches age 
sixty-five. Researchers predict that by 2020, one out of every 
five Americans will be active retirees. 

This is good news and bad news in relation to our aging population. 

The good news is that more and more of our people are experiencing 
added years of productive and pleasurable living. The bad news is 
that an ever increasing number of older people are faced with 
extended months and even years of debilitating ill health. Even as 
thd old are becoming older/ the aging sick tend to be sicker. 

An added concern is the ever-'increasing number of older Adults, 
including many of our retired ministers, who are struggling under 
financial hardships. Many thought they had planned well for the 
retirement years, but the financial requirements of the 1990s were 
almost unimaginable in the 1950s. Furthermore, the expectation was 
that there would be some ten years of life in retirement rather 
than the twenty-plus years that are coming to be the norm. 

Through the ministers of the Brookridge Retirement Community in 
Winston-Salem, The Hamilton Baptist Home in Hamilton, The Taylor 
House in Albemarle, and the Western North Carolina Baptist Home in 
Asheville, Baptist Retirement Homes continues to operate at the 
forefront in meeting the needs of older Adults, 

This year, we look forward to the start of construction on a major 
new facility , . . The Taylor Glen Retirement Community in Concord, 
serving the Cabarrus/Mecklenburg/stanly County areas. Included in 
the plans are 174 independent living apartment homes, 24 assisted 
living apartments, 24 nursing care beds and a 12 bed memory 
impaired unit. 

Baptist Retirement Homes continues to be grateful for the 
exceptional quantity of benevolent care it is able to provide. 
There are no entrance fees associated with any of the health- 
related facilities operated by Baptist Retirement Homes. The 
Hamilton Baptist Home and The Taylor House are among the few not- 
for-profit church-related long-term care, facilities in North 
Carolina with no financial requirements for admission* 

Baptist churches and Baptist people make all of this possible 
through contributions received through the Baptist State Convention 
(Cooperative Program) and the North Carolina Offering for Older 
Adults. In 1998, North Carolina Baptists made it possible for the 
"Homes" to provide $1.7 million in benevolent care. Thank you, 
North Carolina Baptists, for helping us make life for aging saints 
. . . THE BEST OF TIMES! 

DONALD A. DONADIO, chair, Board of Trustees 
WILLIAM B. STILLERMAN, president 





19 98 the Associations 



Report to 




Touching Lives With Hope" 



HOSPITAL CELEBRATES 75 YEARS OF SERVICE 

In May 1998 the North Carolina Baptist Hospitals, Incorporated celebrated 75 years of service to the community 
and the region. During these years the hospital has been faithful to the vision of the North Carolina Baptist State 
Convention when the hospital was birthed: to extend the healing ministry which was demonstrated by Jesus Christ. 
Many challenges have been faced through these years, but the conmiitment to compassionately strive for innovative 
excellence has remained the same. 

Baptist Benevolent Care Fund 

Baptist Churches from all across North Carolina joined us in mutual mission through the Mother's Day Offering. 
This annual ingathering of love was approved by the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina in 1924. In 1997 
the MDO amounted to $500,747. It was used exclusively to help patients who had little or no health care insurance 
or no other financial means to pay their hospital bills. From the offering this past year, well over $200,000 was 
used to assist members of our Baptist Churches in North Carolina. May God bless all those who supported us with 
prayers and gave so generously. 

Division of Pastoral Care 

During the year the chaplains and staff of the Pastoral Care Department provide worship services in Davis 
Memorial Chapel on Monday, Wednesday, Friday and Sunday for patients and family members. The Pastoral Care 
Department staff supervised 64 students during the year and made more than 53,000 ministry contacts. 

The Department of Pastoral Counseling, CareNet, Inc. continues to expand its ministries. There are now 13 
Christian counseling centers located in strategic areas across the state. During the year these professionally staffed 
centers will provide over 26,000 hours of counseling. 

The Center for Congregational Health, Inc. continues to expand its mission of helping congregations become 
tiealthier communities of faith. Programs and assistance offered to churches include: Consultation, Intentional 
Interim Ministry, and Leadership development. Resources for ministers include: Young Leaders Program, Turning 
Point, Interim Ministry Training, Intentional Interim Ministry training. 

Facts about Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center 

• With more than 10,000 employees, four restaurants, two banks and a post office that handles more mail than 
some towns, the Medical Center has been called a city-within-a-city. 

• The Medical Center successfully proposed to Forsyth County Commissioners to purchase the county's indigent 
health care chnic, Reynolds Health Center. The Center also serves as a primary care training facility for our 
medical students and residents. Construction is expected to begin in the spring on a $5 million, state-of-the-art 
facility. 

• Building strong relationships with community hospitals and other academic medical centers was a hallmark of 
the past year. Hospital and clinical affiliations grew to 22 by December '97. 



rhe North Carolina Baptist Hospitals, Incorporated 

36 



Touching Lives With Hope' 



Points of Emphasis and Progress 

ALS CENTER - Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center has opened a specialized center to provide 
coordinated care for patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), often referred to as Lou Gehrig's disease, 
The Medical Center's ALS program is the only center in western North Carolina devoted to ALS patients. 

TRAUMA CENTER - The Medical Center has the designated Level I trauma center for northwest North Carolina, 
In the trauma center our goal is for the patient who needs surgery to be in an operating room 10 minutes aftei 
arriving at the Emergency Department. Surgeons, anesthesiologists and staff remain on duty 24 hours a day to 
handle such emergencies. 

TOPS IN RESEARCH - According to a report in the February 1997 issue of Applied Clinical Trials, Wake 
Forest University School of Medicine ranked in the top 10 U.S. clinical research institutions. 

RANKED AMONG THE NATION'S BEST - The North Carolina Baptist Hospitals, Incorporated is among the 
nation's best hospitals in nine of 17 specialties, according to rankings pubhshed in the July 1998 issue of U.S.m 
News & Wodd Report. * 

NEW HEART VALVE - Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center is one of the first centers in the country tak 
offer a new "natural" valve replacement to patients with diseased or damaged aortic heart valves. The Freestyle 
valve was tested extensively in six centers — including Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center - before 
being released for general use. 

NEWEST TREATMENT FOR EPILEPSY - Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center offers a new treatment 
for epilepsy — a "pacemaker for the brain" that can help control seizures in patients who are not helped by 
medication and are ineligible for surgery. 

INFORMATION AND APPOINTMENTS - For more information, contact one of our operators at (336) 716- 
201 1 . To make an appointment with a physician, contact HEALTH-ON-CALL® at 1 (800) 446-2255. M 

A CLOSING WORD ^ ^ 

Seventy-five years ago the North Carolina Baptist State Convention gave us a directive to extend the heaHng 
ministry of Jesus Christ. For three-quarters of a century, we have sought to carry out this ministry of healing with 
compassion and integrity. Those who come here for care expect outcomes unachievable elsewhere. We must 
constantly rise to meet and exceed this expectation. Every patient and family member has a right to expect from us 
excellence in health care, delivered with compassion. 

Respectfully submitted. 



Len B. Preslar Jr. ]/ 
President 

The North Carolina Baptist Hospitals, Incorporated 



The North Carolina Baptist Hospitals, Incorporated 

37 




Council on Christian Higher Education 

Baptist State Convention of North Carolina 

1998 

Chowan College Campbell University Gardner-Webb University Mars Hill College 

1848 1887 1905 1856 

Meredith College Wake Forest University Wingate University 

1891 1834 1896 



The Council on Christian Higher Education was founded by the Convention in 1944. It was es- 
tablished to assist colleges and churches within the Convention. The Council does not exercise 
any authority over the Baptist colleges. The competent leadership of trustees, administrators, 
and faculty guide them as they fulfill their missions. It does, however, study and recommend to 
the General Board in matters related to Baptist colleges and the Baptist State Convention. 

Four men have led the Council as its Executive Director. Claude Gaddy served as the Council's 
founding leader. Harold Cole served briefly. Ben Fisher succeeded him. T. Robert Mullinax 
joined the Council in 1971. Mullinax retired this year from the post he has faithfully guided for 
27 years. 

The Council and Executive Committee of the Greneral Board invited Wayne D. Wike to become 
the Council's fifth leader. Wike comes to his post from the pastorate. He has served four North 
Carolina churches as pastor. 

He and his wife, Debbie, are alumni of Gardner- Webb University. In addition, he is a graduate 
of the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary and Union Theological Seminary. 

Wike has already served North Carolina Baptists in a number of ways. He served on the Com- 
mittee on Committees, Chaired the Committee on Nominations, and Chaired the General Board 
Membership Study Committee. 

Council members have greatly assisted each one of these leaders through the years. The college 
presidents, provosts, and chairmen of Boards of Trustees, along with an equal number of General 
Board members, serve as members of the Council. 

The strength of the Council lies in its voluntary concept of community rather than competition. 
The Council has proven to be a mediating influence in relating the colleges to each other, to the 
church, and to the Convention. 

The Council is currently involved in strategy planning. It is seeking to prepare for the new mil- 
lenium. The future holds great promise. The Council and its member colleges want to be pre- 
pared for it. The Baptist churches in North Carolina will benefit as a resuh. 



38 



Campbell University 

Norman A. Wiggins, President 

• Opened Januar}- 5, 1887 as Buics Creek Academy 

• Became Campbell University on June 6, 1979. School of Pharmacy and 
School of Education founded in 1985. School of Divinity founded in 1995. 

Campus Representative: Jerry Wood (910-893-1219) 

Chowan College 

Stanley G. Lott, President 

• Founded and opened for students as Chowan Female Institute, October 1 1, 
1848. 

• Became Chowan College on May 17, 1910. 
Campus Representative: Hargus Taylor (252-398-6321) 



Gardner-Webb University 

M. Christopher White, President 

• First charted as Boiling Springs High School, December 2, 1905. 

• Became Gardner-Webb University on January 1, 1993, and opened the 
School of Divinity, Fall 1993. 

Campus Representative: Bruce Rabon (704-434-4256) 



Mars Hill College 

A. Max Lennon, President 

• First commencement as French Broad Baptist Institute, July 4, 1856. 

• Chartered as Mars Hill College, February 16, 1859. 

• Began a senior college program in 1962. 

Campus Representative: Paula Clayton Dempsey (704-689-1 128) 

Meredith College 

John E. Weems, President 

• Incorporated as Baptist Female University of NC, February 27, 1891 

• Became Meredith College by legislative enactment, January 24, 1911. 
Campus Representative: Sam Carothers (919-760-8346) 

Wake Forest University 

Thomas K. Hearn, President 

• Opened as Wake Forest Institute, February 3, 1834. 

• Became Wake Forest University, June 12, 1967. 
Campus Representative: Lynn Parker (336-758-5225) 



Wingate University 

Jerry E. McGee, President 

• Authorized as Wingate School of Union Baptist Association, 1895. Opened 
1896; chartered 1897. 

• Became Wingate University in 1995. 
Campus Representative: Bill Nash (704-233-8241) 



39 



THE BIBLICAL RECORDER 



Associational Report — 1998 

"A democracy can only survive and flourish as a nation of readers," 
says Daniel J. Boorstin, a Pulitzer Prize-winning historian and former 
Librarian of Congress. 

He is correct! Thomas Jefferson said the purest form of democracy he 
had ever seen was Baptist churches. We Baptists cherish our soul-liberty, 
and its corporate corollary — the autonomy of the local church. 

But Baptists will never preserve their democratic form of decision- 
making if they are not properly informed. A democracy demands an informed 
constituency, whether they like the news or not! 

The Biblical Recorder tries to tell the whole story with a focus on the 
many positive things people are doing in their churches and world missions, 
along with the crucial issues which cannot be concealed and ignored if we 
honor our heritage from yesterday and fulfill our mission for tomorrow. 

There is no way to address these issues without correct and reliable 
information. The Biblical Recorder was born and continues to serve for that 
purpose. In the 165 years of state Baptist papers in North Carolina, never 
was the Recorder more needed than now for people to have the truth. 

Because people are reading less than any time in recent history at the 
very time there is an increased number of publications and periodicals, the 
Recorder has kept pace with the state-of-the-art in print media, and entered 
the world of electronic communications with an attractive and effective Web 
site. The Web site address is: http: //www, biblicalrecorder.org. 

The Recorder Web site was officially launched in September 1997. The 
number of persons using the Web site has grown substantially. Each month 
there are 15-18,000 hits from around the world, literally — from Asia, 
Africa, Europe, South America, the Pacific Rim, even Australia! In the 
United States, people from several states regularly use the Recorder as 
their source of dependable Baptist information. 

The Biblical Recorder should be in every Baptist home in North 
Carolina. Your support as a subscriber and reader, coupled with your 
encouragement to others, will enable the paper to better serve the 
constituency with accurate and helpful information. 

In order to save churches large amounts of money and to increase the 
readership of the Recorder , Church News Service (CNS) was launched in 1990. 
This system lets any congregation have their church news incorporated into 
the Biblical Recorder which saves staff time, postage and printing 
costs. Usually, for less than what it costs to produce the church 
newsletter, CNS gives the entire Baptist communication package to each 
family in the congregation. 

The paper deliberately focuses more attention on North Carolina 
Baptists with news, features and inspirational articles which will encourage 
individuals and churches in their witness and ministry. 

That is why the Recorder was born; that is why it serves today. For 
more information on how your church can subscribe or use CNS, contact: 

The Biblical Recorder 
232 West Millbrook Road 
Raleigh, NC 27609 
(919) 847-2127 
E-mail: 70420.66@compuserve.com 
Web site: http://www.biblicalrecorder.org 



40 



Leading Discipleship in a Church 

1998-99 



The way a church disciples its members is chang- 
ing at an extraordinary pace. In fact, there are 
those who claim that "change" is coming faster 
than ever before. This rapid pace of change means 
that churches are being forced to make critical deci- 
sions about discipleship experiences their church may 
need. People being transformed into the likeness of 
Christ and becoming involved in meaningful Christian 
ministry hinges on making these decisions with brevi- 
ty. To deal with this enormous responsibility in a fast 
and ever-changing environment, leaders need all the 
help they can get. Leading Discipleship in a Church 
1^^8-99 is an innovative resource that can help you 
and the churches you serve make the right decisions. 

Leading Discipleship in a Church 1^^8-99 is the 
perfect reference for anyone managing, coordinating, 
or leading discipleship experiences in their church. 
It describes how a church can develop discipleship 
experiences to help people grow in the Christian faith. 
Whether a church is experienced in leading disciple- 
ship or just getting started. Leading Discipleship in a 
Church 1998-99 wall help leaders plan a life-chang- 
ing ministry of discipleship that will benefit the 
church as a whole as well as individual believers. 

Leading Discipleship in a Church 1998-99 ad- 
dresses discipleship through the following sections: 

• What's Discipleship All About? 

• Who Needs to Be Discipled? 

• Who Does the Discipling? 

• What Resources Can We Use to 
Disciple? 

• Tips for Discipling Adults 

• Tips for Discipling Youth 

• Tips for Discipling Children 

• Tips for Discipling Preschoolers 

• Tips for Assimilating New Church Members 

• Tips for Developing Church Leaders 

• How Can Our Church Develop a 
Discipleship Ministry? 

• How Can We Plan for Discipleship? 

• How Can We Get People Involved? 

Leading Discipleship in a Church 1998-99 (Item 
#0-7673-3822-7) is available now for $1.00. I 





1998 Editioii 



A BUNCH OF 

CLIP ART 




,■ andWAYSto 
get people involved' , 
in discipleship 



If you're looking for great ideas to get people in- 
volved in discipleship, we've got a bunch. That is, 
we've got A Bunch of Clip Art and Ways to Get Peo- 
ple Involved in Discipleship 1998 Edition. 

Re-written and updated, this resource provides 
fresh ideas for encouraging discipleship training with- 
in your church and community. Art for text boxes, 
product cover images, and countless helpful sugges- 
tions for designing promotional flyers and bulletins 
are all packed into this unique book and diskette 
combination. In fact, we've filled it with more clip art 
than ever before — thanks in part to the latest space- 
saving file compression techniques — for only $8.95. 

From the hallway bulletin board to an Internet 
home page, A Bunch of Clip Art and Ways to Get 
People Involved in Discipleship 1998 Edition. (Item 
#0-7673-3823-5) is a must for every church that has 
a desire for discipleship. For ordering information, 
see page 12. 



Growing Disciples Weekend Resources 



Now the churches you serve can plan and con- 
duct a weekend event that offers a meaningful and 
challenging discipleship experience for adults, youth, 
and elementary-age children. It will also encourage 
participants to enroU in a Growing Disciples follow- 
up study. Growing Disciples Weekend Administrative 
Guide (Item #0-7673-3859-6, $4.95) can be used to 
schedule and plan any of the four Growdng Disciples 
Weekend events: Experiencing God, MasterLife, Life 
in the Spirit, and The Kingdom Agenda. 

The Growing Disciples Weekend works best 
when three elements are utilized: resource teachers 
representing all age groups, a visiting team of small- 
group leaders, and the involvement of a weekend co- 
ordinator. Visiting team members are secured 
through state convention offices. Every visiting team 
member must have previously completed the study 
that is to be introduced to the church. 



All Growing Disciples Weekend participants 
should make arrangements to join the follow-up ac- 
tivity to be conducted after the weekend experience. 
Visiting team members and church leaders can use 
the Growing Disciples Weekend Administrative 
Guide for the specific follow-up event suggested. 

The following weekend manuals are now avail- 
able: 

• Experiencing God Weekend Manual (Item 
#0-7673-3879-0, $7.95) 

• MasterLife Weekend Manual (Item #0-7673- 
3885-5, $7.95) 

• Life in the Spirit Weekend Manual (Item 
#0-7673-3886-3, $7.95) 

• The Kingdom Agenda Weekend Manual (Item 
#0-7673-3880-4, $7.95) 



42. 



WOMEN ON MISSION 



Yes, we have a mission and that is to teach and do missions. We are to know what is 
happening with our missionaries and inform our pastors and churches. If there is a need in 
our churches or neighborhoods, we are to see that the need is taken care of 

I feel that the ladies of Stony Fork Association are doing a great job of doing this. This 
past year each church performed missions work by sending flowers, preparing food, 
giving love offerings, seeing that people who needed help had a way to their doctor's 
office, and so much more. 

As an associational WMU, we had 10 ladies attend the state meeting at Ridgecrest in the 
spring. What a blessing that was! We gave a pastor, deacon and wives dinner that was a 
great success. We had a Christmas dinner that was a lot of flm. We helped gather and 
send coats to North Korea. Each WMU filled and sent shoe boxes to the Samaritan 
Purse in Boone to be distributed to needy children overseas. 

We also sent musical instruments to Mt. View Baptist Church in Montana. We sent fabric 
to make choir robes for the choir. Pleas remember this iittrle mission and we hope to help 
them more throughout the coming year. 

We are working on a cookbook with recepies from all the churches in the Association and 
hope to have this ready to sell later in the year. 

The N.C. State WMU is working with the women inmates to help train them for 
jobs when they are relaeased and to try to win them to the Lord. 

I want to thank our pastors and each of you for your prayers and support during this past 
year. 



43 



Christian Action League of North Carolina 
6339 Glenwood Avenue, Ste. 442 
Raleigh, NC 27612 
(919)787-0606 

ANNUAL REPORT TO THE ASSOCIATIONS 
1998 

It is a joy for the Christian Action League of North Carolina to serve the churches of this great state. We continue to work to inform 
istian community about the moral issues that face our state and nation. Our goal is to address these issues with the principles of God's 
he cornerstone of all truth. 



Christian Values 

It was the pleasure of the Christian Action League to be one of the sponsors of the Third Annual Christian Heritage Week of North 
Carolina held March 15-22. The League encouraged schools, churches and communities to recognize, commemorate and learn about 
the Christian heritage and history of our nation. CAL sponsored a state-wide essay contest for high school students (public, private 
and home schools) and presented state winners with awards for excellence. 

Continued to promote Christian citizenship throughout the churches and communities of our state. CAL has distributed over 12,000 
copies of the Ten Commandments to churches, businesses, schools and homes across North Carolina. Promoted Sanctity of Human 
Life Sunday and the National Day of Prayer statewide. 

Held a Church Leadership Legislative Day on June 23. The purpose of this day was to have pastors and church leaders to come 
together and enjoy fellowship, meet and hear some of our legislators and become more aware of how state government and the 
legislative process works. 
Gambling 

Lottery proponents continue in their efforts to bring a state-sponsored lottery to North Carolina. CAL monitors these efforts and 
; the Christian community on lottery information through letters, calls and our fax and electronic mail networks. Lawmakers have 
ed to receive a barrage of communications from across the state saying that the lottery is a bad bet for North Carolina. 

CAL also monitored the work of the Legislative Study Committee on Bingo Regulations. 

Sg X Edugqtip n 

Worked with other Christian and pro-family groups to see that the state mandate for Abstinence Until Marriage education is 
lented state-wide. Also, supported efforts to insure that federal grant money designated to promote abstinence education was used 
y. Informed citizens and legislators concerning attempts to ftmd school-based clinics in North Carolina schools. 

Abortion 

CAL promoted HB 303 (Ban Partial Birth Abortion), HB 536 (Woman's Right to Know before Abortion) and HB 594 (Fetus Death 
riminal Act). We also encouraged lawmakers to maintain fiinding reductions and restrictions on the state abortion fund. These actions . 
suited in only two qualifying abortions being paid with taxpayer fiinds in the last two years. 

Alcohol 

CAL monitored all legislation concerning alcohol eind other drugs. Successfiilly supported efforts to strengthen DWI laws. Assisted 
inities in organizing committees to fight alcohol and drug use. Worked to defeat legislation that would have approved alcohol sales 
t the vote of the pennle Provided awareness, education and resource materials related to substance abuse problems to churches, 
inities, etc. 

CAL will host a national conference in September of the American Council on Alcohol Problems. 
Pornography 

Promoted and saw ratified SB 452-Local Regulation of Adult Establishments. This legislation gives more authority to local 
inities to regulate and control adult entertainment establishments. 
Homosexuality 

CAL supports efforts to strengthen the traditional family and continues to monitor and inform the public about the activities of those 
omote the radical homosexual agenda. Successfully lobbied against legislation that would have made homosexuality legal in North 
la. Offered the video "On Wings Like Eagles", the testimony of deliverance from homosexuality by Michael Johnston of Kerruso 
ies. 

^ , I \ For A Better North Carolina, 




nd Johnny R. Henderson ^ Joe S. Lennon 

ive Director President 

44 



A REPORT TO THE 1998 ANNUAL MEETING OF THE STONY FORK BAPTIST 
ASSOCIATION CONCERNING AN EFFORT TO RE-ENLIST INACTIVE 
CHURCHES INTO THE ASSOCIATION 



Mount. View Baptist. Church 
Pastor: Rev Mike Barfoot 

Status: Became inactive 

1/20/98 Contacted Rev. Barfoot about the possibility of 
becoming active in Associational work. He stated that he was 
not interested in doing so but would pray about the matter 
and call later. 



New Hopewell Baptist Church 
Pastor: Rev Douglas Bare, Elk Park NC Ph. 733 3219 

Status: Became inactive 

Contacted Rev. Bare on 2/23/98. He indicated that he would 
discuss rejoining the Assocation with his deacons and let me 
know what their reaction was. 

Bill Vines, Deacon 

Odell Coffey, Deacon ^ 
Danny Gragg, Deacon ^ 

Deacon Danny Gragg called on 2/26/98 to inform me that the 
pastor and deacons had discussed the possibility of rejoining 
the Association and concluded that they would not do so at 
this time. 

New Hopewell holds three preaching services weekly. Sunday 
morning and evening and Wed. night. 

A singing is held on first Saturday nights. There is no 
preaching service on Sunday evenings after singings. 



45 



Yellow Hill Baptist Church 
Pastor: Rev. Charles Ratliff 336 696 4260 



Status: Submitted a letter of withdrawal, 

1/22/98 Phone conversation with Rev. Ratliff. Appointment to 
meet at Yellow Hill Church on 1/29/98 at 7:00 PM. 



1/29/98 Met with Rev. Ratliff. We had a long and productive 
discussion of the possibility of the Church at 
Yellow Hill becoming a part of the Stoney Fork 
Association. He voiced concerns over churches that 
were part of other associations that held liberal 
views that he did not agree with. I explained that 
the autonomy of the local church is not altered by 
membership in an association. He indicated that he 
would discuss the matter with the deacons and 
contact me concerning the matter. 



3/22/98 Met with the congregation at Yellow Hill. I gave 

them an overview of the goals and objectives of the 
Association and emphasized that membership did not 
in any way alter the autonomy of the local church. I 
opened the floor for questions and was pleased that 
there was what seemed to be a good deal of interest 
among the members of the congregation. 

7/30/98 Spoke with Rev. Ratliff by phone. He indicated that 
he had presented the question of rejoining the 
Association to the church and that a majority of the 
people had not felt led to change 



Respectfully Submitted 
Roy Gryder D.O.M. 



46 



CHURCH GROWTH MULTIPLIER REPORT 1998 



Tliank God for tlie privilege of servings as your Cliiircli 
Growtli Consultant Team in Western, Nortli Carolina. We're a 

special worlker team oti befoalf of tlie NC Baptist State 
Convention. 

We have seen some wonderful things happen in churches 
where we have heen. God is really blessing. 

If we can be of help to any association or church in the areas 
of Sunday School, WMU, or Discipleship Training, please feel 
free to call on us. 

We are committed to helping churches to grow numerically 
and spiritually. God wants us to grow. 

Respectfully submitted. 
Your Western NC Team 

Fred Lunsford, Team Leader 
155 Vengeance Creek Rd 
Marble, NC 28905 
Phone: 828-837-2605 

Sharon L. Kephart 
1045 Ebenezer Rd 
Murphy, NC 28906 
828-837-6530 

Suthell Walker 
202 Hartley St 
Spindale, NC 28160 
828-286-2737 

Jim Clouse 
Rt 2 Box 256 

Hendersonville NC 28792 
828-685-3892 

47 



RESOLUTIONS 



Let it be resolved that the Stony Fork Association expresses its thanks and 
appreciation to Sandy Flat and Bailey's Camp Churches for their hospitality 
and good food. 

We also want to thank God for our moderator. Director of Missions, and for 
all thos who gave such informative and interesting reports. 

Betty Woods 
OBITUARIES 

Mt . Ephraim - Mrs. Madgaline Robbins and Mrs. Ella Miller 
Lajftown - Mrs. Pauline Mast 



48 



Stony Fork Baptist Association 
Approved Budget 
for 
1998-1999 



Director of Missions (expense): 


$ 900 


.00 


Clerk honorarium: 


250 


.00 


Treasurer honorarium: 


250 


.00 


VBS: 


250 


.00 


Discipleship Training: 


150 


.00 


Sunday School : 


100 


.00 


Evangelism (inc. conference) 


200 


.00 


mil]: 


450 


.00 


Convention (2 persons): 


200 


.00 


Clerical : 


50 


.00 


Minutes : 


250 


.00 


Benevolent fund: 


1000 


.00 


Total: 


$4050 


.00 



49 



PROCEEDINGS 



i 



PROCEEDINGS 
FOR 

THE ONE HUNDRED AND THIRTY- SEVENTH ANNUAL MEETING 

OF 

STONY FORK MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION 

The meeting was called to order by the moderator, Roy Kanupp, at 8:30 a.m. on Friday, August 
7, 1998 at Sandy Flat Baptist Church. The meeting was conducted in the following order with all 
reports being approved by the congregation present. 

8:35 Song - "Prayer Bells of Heaven" . 

8:40 Devotion - Charles Craig from Psalms 23: 1-6. God knows everything that is needed in 
in our hearts today. He gives us guidance, and is always present. Prayer led by 
Max West. 

9:00 Moved for the adoption of the program. This was seconded and approved with 

changes to be made when necessary. 
9:05 Roll Call 

Bailey's Camp 3, Doe Ridge 3, Laytown 2, Mt. Ephraim 2, Rock Spring 3, 

Sandy Flat 6, Visitors 3, tota 1 22. 
9: 10 There were no new workers or ministers present to be recognized. 
9:11 Vacation Bible School Report - Edith Gryder. 

9: 15 Foreign Missions - Eunice Luttrell. Speaker - Walter Ford. The international 

mission board is undergoing a lot of change now, trying to find a plan that will reach 
the unreachable by focusing on language groups. People's needs are changing and 
the way we did things 25 years ago no longer work. 

The bombings in East Africa today at the American Embassy have put every American 
missionary there in danger due to the Muslim extremists, who know exactly where 
each American lives. 

There is a great need for church planters at the International Mission Board. The N.C. 

brotherhood still has international work going in South Africa and the Ukraine. 

N.C. is also working on a project that will be starting in the year 2000 with Venezuela. 

Medical teams are going into Asia and China now. 
9:25 Sunday School report will be given tomorrow. 
9:25 Cooperative Program and Stewardship Reports - Linda Mills. 
9:30 Evangelism Report - Tim Dockery. Speaker Roy Coulder. I serve on the General 

Board and bring regards from Milton HoUifield, director of Evangelism. For the 

4th. consecutive year there has been an increase in baptisms: 27,5 1 1 in 1997 which 

was a 7% increase over 1996 which was a new record since 1975. 

Celebrate Jesus 2000 is the largest evangelistic thrust undertaken. Manuals have 
been sent out to each church from the NAMB to help you guide your church. The 
SBC and NAMB will have positive Christian information that will be on T. V. which 
will begin in 1999, where the fields are truly white unto harvest. The Jesus video 



50 



continues to be a great evangelism tool. 

Super Summer at Carrowinds this year is expected to attract more that 25,000 young 
people. 

In closing, thank you for all your giving and praying but especially your giving to 

the Cooperative Program so that N.C. Baptist can say they are busy about their Father's 

business. 

10:00 Finance Report - Budget. Copies of the proposed budget were given to each individual. 
Voting on the budget will take place tomorrow. 

10:05 Break. 

10:30 Home Missions - NAMB - Eunice Luttrell 

10:35 N.C. State Missions - Eunice Luttrell. The NC Mission offering will be gathered 
next month. Encourage your church to take part in this. 

10:40 Children's Homes - Max West. Speaker, Donna Lail, Children's Home in Lenoir. 
I have been with the Baptist Children's Homes for 28 years now. Children face 
harder situations today than ever before. Some have severe behavioral problems and 
school problems. The Caldwell Children's Home has a partnership with the Dept. of 
Social Services. The teenagers with babies here all go to school. Some have jobs. 
Noel Home is a place for teenage girls with severe behavior problems and school 
age girls having family problems. We work with the entire family to try to resolve 
those problems. Substance abuse is a big problem now. 

We have a 1 5 year old male and a 17 year old female now living with their grand- 
parents, who were left alone as infants in N. Y. City by parents on drugs. The male 
is very angry and questions why they didn't care about him. We are helping him 
deal with these questions and emotions. 

All across the state. Children's Homes are short of staff. Pray that people will hear 
God's call to give in to the call and help these children. 

Some needs are: Acteen classes, school supplies, paper products, toiletry items and 
especially diapers. My phone no. is 757-0700. 

1 1 :05 Retirement Homes Report - Mamie Craig. Speaker could not make it. 
11:10 Baptist Hospital Report - No Speaker. 

11:11 Christian Higher Education Report - No Speaker. _ 
11:15 Special Music 

11:35 Annual Message - Tim Dockery. We Have A Purpose, Philippians 1:12, 19-26. 

Paul was between a rock and a hard place. He wanted to go home to be with Jesus 
but he also knew his ministry was needed on earth. 



51 



Today, with the condition of the world, Heaven would be so much better. But, 
most definitely there is a need for us to be here, or we would already be at home 
with Jesus. 

We are going to be delivered one day fi^om the corruption of this body. We have 
been redeemed by the blood of Jesus. But while we are here we have a purpose: 

1. For the furtherance of the Gospel. There are many lost souls in our own 
neighborhoods. This is our responsibility that we cannot pass on to someone 
else. 

2. For the furtherance of joy and faith. Each of us today, if you are a child of God, 
has a purpose to edify the Lord. Each one of us has a role in the church, a 
specific responsibility to fill. Our lives should be glowing by the spirit of the 
Lord. We need to fight the good fight of faith. If we all work together, side by 
side, we can go faster and do better for the Lord. 

For what do you live? What makes you happy? In Paul's case, he was alive for 
Jesus. Be dedicated to Jesus, not things of the world. Put Him first in all things. 
The things we do should bring glory to Him. What is your purpose in living? 

12:30 Adjourn 
Lunch 



PROCEEDINGS 
FOR 

SECOND DAY OF ANNUAL MEETEVG 
AT 

BAILEY'S CAMP 
AUGUST 8, 1998 



8:30 Call to order - Arvil Hardy, Vice Moderator 
8:35 Song - "Leaning on the Everlasting Arms. 
8:40 Prayer - Roy Gryder 

8:46 Devotion - Max West. Deuteronomy 6: 1-15. The Family. God was speaking to a nation 
of people but as individuals. Obey God that it may be well with thee. How are things 
going with you, in your home and in your nation? It just did not happen that we are a 
nation that is blessed. God put the first family together and we need to focus on that in 
society today. 

9:10 Roll Call 

Bailey's Camp 4, Doe Ridge 3, Laytown 2, Mt. Ephraim 3, Rock Spring 3, Sandy Flat 
4. Total 19. 

9: 15 Sunday School Report - Ted Triplett. I support Sunday School and it has been a big 
part of my life. It think it is the backbone of our churches. I have given each church a 
study guide from the convention. Each pastor might challenge his people with things 
like perfect attendance. There is no better place for personal growth than Sunday School. 



52 



We are beginning a new fiscal year now and this would be a good time to challenge your 
Sunday School people to find a way to grow this year. 



9:20 Biblical Recorder Report - No speaker. Report to the Association read. 

9:25 Discipleship Training - Charles Craig. Information has been given to each pastor 

to order literature fi^ee. How long has Discipleship Training been around? I think 

it would go back to Adam and the beginning of time. 

Discipleship Training is the most accurate name for this program that we have ever 
had. Jesus is our model as to what man ought to be and how we should disciple. 

9:45 Women on Mission Report - Eunice Luttrell. 

9:50 Christian Action League Report - No report given. Roy Gryder spoke to this report. 
We Hve in a time when I am constantly reminded that we need temperance and morals 
in this country. Our temperance and morals are not what they should be and what God 
would have them be. A long and discouraging list could be given of things that are not 
right. Let us search in our churches for someone to report on these concerns and 
problems, such as legalized gambling and the sale of alcoholic beverages, to make us 
aware of when we should act and/or pray. 

9:55 General Board Report - Ron Burgett. This is my second year and it has been an 
experience for me. There are 120 members on the General Board who serve on 
different subcommittees. We meet between the conventions three times a year. I 
serve on the youth and campus subcommittee. 

10:00 Break 

10:25 Resolutions - Betty Woods. 
10:30 Obituaries - Clerk. 

10:35 Business Meeting, Election of Officers for coming year. Max West, Chairman of 

Nominating Committee: Moderator - Tim Dockery, Vice-Moderator - Ron Burgette, 
Clerk - Linda Mills, Treasurer - Edith Gryder, Sunday School Director - Ted Triplette, 
Discipleship Training - Charles Craig, Music Director - Pauline Eldreth, Stewardship- 
Cooperative Program - Linda Mills, Home, State, and Foreign Missions - Women on 
Mission Director, Eunice Luttrell, Retirement Homes - Mamie Craig, Children's Homes 
Arvil Hardy, Resolutions - Betty Woods, Obituaries - Clerk, Vacation Bible School - 
Glen Luttrell, Baptist Hospital - Bonnie Walsh, Christian Higher Education - open. 
Temperance and Morals/Christian Action League - Dale Luttrell, Baptist Foundation - 
Pauline Eldreth, Evangelism - Tim Dockery, Biblical Recorder - Clerk will read the 
report as no speaker is available. 
COMMITTEES: 

Finance - Edith Gryder, Eunice Luttrell, Ron Burgett, Tim Dockery, Coleman Oliver. 
Constitution and By-laws - Pastors of each church and Charles Craig. 
Missions - Pastors of each church. 

Nominating Committee - Pastors of each church. Max West, Chairman. 
10:55 Director of Missions Report - Roy Grryder 
11:15 Special Singing 

1 1 :30 Annual Message - Max West. Matthew 16:26. In thinking about this verse, focus 



53 



upon the soul. The important word in this verse is soul. What us a soul? The 
dictionary says it is "the spiritual part of a human being that is believed to survive 
death". It vAW live somewhere forevermore. When God breathed breath into man, 
he became a living soul. The soul is the ultimate important thing in all life. What 
does it profit us to gain the whole world and lose our soul? 

In our society today, it is not the soul that is important. It is jobs, land, cars and 
money that is important to most people. The Bible says that where our heart is 
our soul is also. We put too much emphasis on these things instead of our soul. 
The most important thing we can teach our children is that their soul needs to be 
saved. We have so many more things materially today, but at what cost? Jesus 
died for the soul of man, not the material things or the body. Our greatest job today 
is to be good parents and grandparents because we are molding young minds. 
12:00 Adjourn 
Lunch 



54 



HISTORY AND HISTORICAL TABLE 



HISTORY AND HISTORICAL TABLE 



Year Churches 



Moderator 



Clerk 



Preacher 



1862 

1863 
1864 
1865 
1866 
1867 
1868 
1869 
1870 
1871 
1872 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1892 
1893 
1894 
1895 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 



Zions Gate Meeting Larkin Hodges Larkin Pipes 
House, Wilkes Co. 

Yellow Hill Larkin Hodges 

Minuets were not printed, manuscript 



Mt. Ephraim 
South Fork 
Watauga 
Union 
Stony Fork 
Old Field 
Elk 

Mt. Vernon 
Watauga 
Yellow Hill 
Laurel Fork 
Stony Fork 
Poplar Grove 
Old Field 
Elk 

Mt. Vernon 
Watauga 
Mt. Ephraim 
Yellow Hill 
Boones For 
Buffalo Cove 
Stony Fork 
Union 

Laurel Fork 
Poplar Grove 
Mt. Vernon 
Watauga 
Mt. Paran 
Boones Fork 
Yellow Hill 
New River 
Elk 

Laurel Fork 
Buffalo Cove 

Mt. Vernon 

Watauga 



Larkin Hodges 
Larkin Hodges 
Larkin Hodges 
Larkin Hodges 
Larkin Hodges 
Larkin Hodges 
Larkin Hodges 
Larkin Hodges 
Larkin Hodges 
Larkin Hodges 
Larkin Hodges 
Larkin Hodges 
Larkin Hodges 
Larkin Hodges 
Larkin Hodges 
Larkin Hodges 
Larkin Hodges 
J.F. Eller 
J.F. Eller 
Larkin Hodges 
J.F. Eller 
E.M. Gragg 

E. M. Gragg 
James Parsons 

F. M. Gragg 
E.M. Gragg 
E.M. Gragg 
E.M. Gragg 
E.M. Gragg 
E.M. Gragg 
E.M. Gragg 
E.M. Gragg 
E.M. Gragg 
J.C. Miller 
E.M. Gragg 
E.M. Gragg 



Larkin Pipes 
got lost 
J.R. Hodges 
Elijah Trivette 
James Parsons 
James Parsons 
James Parsons 
James Parsons 
James Parsons 
James Parsons 
James Parsons 
W.E. Greene 
W.E. Greene 
W.E. Greene 
Elijah Trivette 
W.E. Greene 
W.E. Greene 
W.E. Greene 
Elijah Trivette 
John R. Hodges 
Elijah Trivette 
Thomas Pipes 
Thomas Pipes 
Wm. M. Lee 
Wm. M. Lee 
Wm. M. Lee 
Wm. M. Lee 
Wm. M. Lee 
Wm. M. Lee 
Wm. M. Lee 
Wm. M. Lee 
Wm. M. Lee 
Wm. M. Lee 
Wm. M. Lee 
Wm. M. Lee 
Wm. M. Lee 
R-H. Pipes 
Wm. M. Lee 



Larkin Hodges 

Wilson Bradshaw 

Joseph Harrison 
Larkin Hodges 
J.R. Carlton 
James Parsons 
W.H. Phillips 
William Wilcox 
James Parsons 
J.R. Carlton 
Larkin Hodges 
James Parsons 
Levi Wilson 
Larkin Hodges 
James Parsons 
J.R. Carlton 
Monroe Gragg 
Monroe Gragg 
Levi Wilson 
James Parsons 
Larkin Hodges 
Larkin Pipes 
J.F. Eller 
E.M. Gragg 
David Eller 
Wm. M. Lee 
John F. Eller 
E. M. Gragg 
J.C. Miller 
E.M. Gragg 
S.T. Carroll 
John F. Eller 
Geo. W. Trivette 
J.C. Miller 
W.M. Lee 
J.F. Davis 
J. F. Sherwood 
D. C. Harman 



1901 


Stony Fork 


J. C. Miller 


Wm. M. Lee 


John Crisp 


1902 


Poplar Grove 


J.C. Miller 


A. J. Shull 


J.C. Blaylock 


1903 


Boones Fork 


F. M. Gragg 


Wm. M. Lee 


J.C. Miller 


1904 


Mt. Ephraim 


F. M. Gragg 


Wm. M. Lee 


F. M. Gragg 


1905 


Mt. Paran 


E. M. Gragg 


Wm. M. Lee 


Wm. M. Lee 


1906 


Yellow Hill 


Thos. L. Day 


Wm. M. Lee 


Asa Brown 


1907 


New River 


Thos. L. Day 


Wm. M. Lee 


J. F. Davis 


1908 


Middle Cane 


James F. Church 


Wm. M. Lee 


J.C. Miller 


1909 


Elk 


Thos. L. Day 


Wm. M. Lee 


J.C. Miller 


1910 


Laurel Fork 


Thos. L. Day 


Wm. M. Lee 


Wm. M. Lee 


1911 


Mt. Vernon 


Thos. L. Day 


Wm. M. Lee 


D. M. Wheeler 


1912 


Poplar Grove 


Thos. L. Day 


Wm. M. Lee 


R.F. Wilcox 


1913 


Watauga 


Thos. L. Day 


N.S. Hampton 


N.S. Hampton 


1914 


Mt. Ephraim 


Thos. L. Day 


Wm. M. Lee 


Wm. M. Lee 


1915 


Boones Fork 


Thos. L. Day 


Wm. M. Lee 


D. M. Wheeler 


1616 


Rock Spring 


B. F. Wilcox 


Wm. M. Lee 


Wm. M. Lee 


1917 


Mt. Paran 


B. F. Wilcox 


N.S. Hampton 


N.S. Hampton 


1918 


Due to outbreak of influenza, no Association was held 




1919 


Yellow Hill 


B. F. Wilcox 


N. S. Hampton 


B.F. Wilcox 


1920 


Mt. Vernon 


B. F. Wilcox 


N. S. Hampton 


N. S. Hampton 


1921 


Laurel Fork 


B. F. Wilcox 


N. S. Hampton 


D. M. Wheeler 


1922 


Watauga 


B. F. Wilcox 


N. S. Hampton 


Oscar Dillinger 


1923 


Poplar Grove 


B. F. Wilcox 


N. S. Hampton 


N. S. Hampton 


1924 


Boones Fork 


B. F. Wilcox 


J. A. Hampton 


W.D. Ashley 


1925 


Mt. Ephraim 


B. F. Wilcox 


J.A. Hampton 


J. A. Hampton 


1926 


Rock View 


D. M. Wheeler 


J. A. Hampton 


G.M. Watson 


1927 


Elk 


D. M. Wheeler 


R-F. Wilcox 


A.C. Hamby 


1928 


Watauga 


D. M. Wheeler 


B.F. Wilcox 


B.F. Wilcox 


1929 


Sandy Flat 


D. M. Wheeler 


B.F. Wilcox 


G.M. Watson 


1930 


Middle Can 


W.D. Ashley 


B.F. Wilcox 


Linney Barnes 


1931 


Laurel Fork 


W.D. Ashley 


B.F. Wilcox 


B.F. Wilcox 


1932 


New Hopewell 


G.M. Watson 


B.F. Wilcox 


J.T. McGuire 


1933 


Yellow Hill 


B.F. Wilcox 


Roy Keller 


G.M. Watson 


1934 


Mt. Vernon 


G.W. Gragg 


Roy Keller 


R.H. Shore 


1935 


Grandmother Gap 


G.W. Gragg 


Roy Keller 


W.J. Cook 


1936 


Mt. Ephraim 


G.W. Gragg 


Roy Keller 


Carl Triplett 


1937 


Mt. View 


B. F. Wilcox 


G.M. Watson 


Ray Hendrix 


1938 


Watauga 


Carl Triplett 


F.L. Hampton 


W.D. Ashley 


1939 


Laurel Fork 


Carl Triplett 


F.L. Hampton 


W.J. Cook 


1940 


Bailey's Camp 


Carl Triplett 


F.L. Hampton 


G.M. Watson 


1941 


Sandy Flat 


Lee J. Church 


N.L. Harrison 


Roy Keller 


1942 


New Hopewell 


Lee J. Church 


N.L. Harrison 


B.F. Wilcox 


1943 


Boone Fork 


Lee J. Church 


N.L. Harrison 


W. B. Bryant 


1944 


Watauga 


N.L. Harrison 


W.M. Brown 


Frank Knight 


1945 


Laytown 


N.L. Harrison 


W.M. Brown 


W.D. Ashley 



1946 Mt. Vernon 

1947 Yellow Hill 

1948 Doe Ridge - No 

1949 Mt. Paran 

1950 Rock Spring 

1951 New Hopewell 

1952 Boone Fork 

1953 East Flats 

1954 Mt. Ephraim 

1955 Bailey's Camp 

1956 Laurel Fork 

1957 Mt. Vernon 
Sandy Flat 

1958 Lay town 
Rock Spring 

1959 New Hopewell 
Long Ridge 

1960 Mt Paran 
Boones Fork 

1961 Watauga 
Yellow Hill 

1962 Mt. Ephraim 
Sandy Flat 

1963 Doe Ridge 
Rock Spring 

1964 Bailey's Camp 
Boone Fork 

1965 Laurel Fork 
Laytown 

1966 Long Ridge 
Mt. Paran 

1967 Mt. Vernon 
New Hopewell 

1968 Rock Spring 
Sandy Flat 

1969 Bailey's Camp 
Boone Fork 

1970 Laurel Fork 
Doe Ridge 

1971 Laytown 
Long Ridge 

1972 Mt. Ephraim 
Mt. Paran 

1973 Mt. Vernon 
New Hopewell 



G.M. Watson 
Theo Hendrix 
minutes, manuscript lost at 
Theo Hendrix 
Theo Hendrix 
Theo Hendrix 
G.M. Watson 
Theo Hendrix 
Theo Hendrix 
Theo Hendrix 
Theo Hendrix 

Theo Hendrix 

Theo Hendrix 

Carson Eggers 

Carson Eggers 

Carson Eggers 

Carson Eggers 

Carson Eggers 

E.O. Bustle 

E.O. Bustle 
Archie Clawson 
A.C. Moody 
Archie Clawson 
Archie Clawson 
A.C. Moody 
Archie Clawson 
Lewis Hodges 
Lewis Hodges 
Lewis Hodges 
Lewis Hodges 
David Austin 
David Austin 
David Austin 
David Austin 
Marvin Saunders 
Marvin Saunders 



W. M. Brown 
G.M. Watson 
printers 
G.M. Watson 
N.L. Harrison 
N. L. Harrison 
J. Merritt Coffey 
G.M. Watson 
G.M. Watson 
G.M. Watson 
J.Merritt Coffey 



W.D. Ashley 
Roscoe Greene 

Roscoe Greene 
R.L. Barnes 
Barney Oliver 
W.J. Cook 
R.L. Barnes 
Lloyd Duller 
W.J. Cook 
W.M. Brown 



J.Merritt Coffey W.J. Cook 



J. M. Coffey 



Carson Eggers 
W.J. Cook 



J.Merritt Coffey 
J.M. Coffey Wendell Critcher 

J.M. Coffey 
Winifred Hampton 



Dupree Gowan 
Roby McNeil 
Winifred Hampton W.M. Brown 



Mrs.Clark Story W.M. Quinn 



Mrs. Clark Story 
Mrs. Clark Story 
Mrs. Clark Story 
Mrs. Clark Story 
Mrs. Clark Story 
Mrs. Clark Story 
Mrs. Clark Story 
Mrs. Clark Story 
Mrs. Clark Story 
Barbara West 
Barbara West 
Barbara West 
Barbara West 
Barbara West 
Barbara West 
Barbara West 
Barbara West 



W.M. Brown 
Phillip Martin 
Pete Vannoy 
Basil Tester 
E.O. Bustle 
A.C. Moody 
R. Matheson 
Lewis Hodges 
Herring Crisp 
Davis Austin 
Archie Clawson 
Ray Turbyfill 
Sherrill Welborn 
Gurney Robbins 
A. C. Moody 
Everette Watson 
Sherrill Welborn 



1974 


Rock Spring 


Marvin Saunders 


Barbara West 


Merle Johnson 




Sandy Flat 


Marvin Saunders 


Barbara West 


Dale Milstead 


1975 


Yellow Hill 


Merle Johnson 


Barbara West 


Dean Hodges 




Bailey's Camp 


Merle Johnson 


Barbara West 


Max West 


1976 


Boone Fork 


Charles Craig 


Barbara West 


A.C. Moody 




Doe Ridge 


Charles Craig 


Barbara West 


Lloyd HoUman 


1977 


Laurel Fork 


Charles Craig 


Barbara West 


Raymond Hendrix 




Laytown 


Charles Craig 


Barbara West 


Max West 


1978 


Long Ridge 


Charles Craig 


Barbara West 


Phillip Martin 




Mt. Ephraim 


Charles Craig 


Barbara West 


A.C. Moody 


1979 


Mt. Vernon 


Max West 


Barbara West 


Harold Bean 




Boone Fork 


Max West 


Barbara West 


Harold Danner 


1980 


Mt. Paron 


Max West 


Barbara West 


Jim Lambert 




New Hopewell 


Max West 


Barbara West 


Burl Jones 


1981 


Rock Spring 


Max West 


Barbara West 


Cannon Ward 




Sandy Flat 


Max West 


Barbara West 


Jim Lambert 


1982 


Watauga 


Max West 


Barbara West 


Jack White 




Bailey's Camp 


Max West 


Barbara West 


Cecil Gragg 


1983 


Boone Fork 


Jack White 


Barbara West 


Burl Jones 




Doe Ridge 


Jack White 


Barbara West 


J.R Robbins 


1984 


Laurel Fork 


Jack White 


Linda Mills 


Jack White 




Laytown 


Jack White 


Linda Mills 


Ed Greene 


1985 


Long Ridge 


J. R. Robbins 


Linda Mills 


Scott Church 




Mt. Ephraim 


J. R Robbins 


Linda Mills 


Ed Greene 


1986 


Rock Spring 


J. R Robbins 


Linda Mills 


Scott Church 




Sandy Flat 


J.R. Robbins 


Linda Mills 


Max West 


1987 


Bailey's Camp 


J. R Robbins 


Linda Mills 


Greg Mathis 




Boone Fork 


J.R Robbins 


Linda Mills 


Everette Little 


1988 


Doe Ridge 


Scott Church 


Linda Mills 


Kenneth Ridings 




Laytown 


Scott Church 


Linda Mills 


Carter Moretz 


1989 


Long Ridge 


Scott Church 


Linda Mills 


Alex Booth 




Mt. Ephraim 


Scott Church 


Linda Mills 


Carter Moretz 


1990 


Rock Spring 


George Berry 


Linda Mills 


Scott Church 




Sandy Flat 


George Berry 


Linda Mills 


Max West 


1991 


Bailey's Camp 


George Berry 


Linda Mills 


Jimmy Hubbard 




Boone Fork 


George Berry 


Linda Mils 


Eugene Fillers 


1992 


Doe Ridge 


George Berry 


Linda Mills 


Arvil Hardy 




Laytown 


George Berry 


Linda MDls 


Dennis Geouge 


1993 


Long Ridge 


Max West 


Linda Mills 


John McCoury 




Mt. Ephraim 


Max West 


Linda Mills 


Sherrill Dunn 


1994 


Rock Spring 


Max West 


Linda Mills 


Richard Baird 




Sandy Flat 


Max West 


Linda Mills 


Leon Silver 


1995 


Bailey's Camp 


Ron Burgett 


Linda Mills 


Max West 




Doe Ridge 


Ron Burgett 


Linda Mills 


Arvil Hardy 


1996 


Laytown 


Ron Burgett 


Linda Mills 


Danny Murphy 



Long Ridge 

1997 Mt. Ephraim 
Rock Spring 

1998 Sandy Flat 
Bailey's Camp 



Ron Burgett 
Roy Kanupp 
Roy Kanupp 
Roy Kanupp 
Roy Kanupp 



Linda Mills 
Linda Mills 
Linda Mills 
Linda Mills 
Linda Mills 



John McCoury 
Tim Dockery 
Ron Burgett 
Tim Dockery 
Max West 



The churches; Buffalo Cove, Cool Springs, Wilkes County Elk, Stony Fork, and Yellow 
Hill, formerly belonging to other associations. 

Met at the Stony Fork Baptist Church and organized the Stony Fork Baptist Association 
on November 9th and 10th., 1880. For this meeting, appointed Elder Larkin Hodges, 
moderator and Brother Elijah Trivette, Clerk- 



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STONY FORK MISSIONARY 
BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 
OF NORTH CAROLINA 
2000 ANNUAL MEETING 



2000 MINUTES OF THE 
ONE HUNDRED AND THIRTY-NINTH 

ANNUAL MEETING 
OF 

STONY FORK MISSIONARY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

AT 

MT. EPHRAIM, AUGUST 11 , 2000 
AND 

ROCK SPRING, AUGUST 12, 2000 



1 k 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Associational Leaders 1 

Vacation Bible School 2 

International Missions 3 

Stewardship/Cooperative Program 5 

Christian Higher Education 7 

Financial Report 8 

Approved Budget 9 

North American Missions 10 

Children's Homes 11 

Baptist Foundation 13 

Discipleship Training 15 

Women on Mission 16 

Christian Action League 17 

Retirement Homes 18 

Resolutions/Obituaries 19 

Proceedings 20 

Tables 

History and Historical Tables 



STONY FORK 
ASSOCIATIONAL LEADERS 



Director of Missions RoyGryder 



ACP Contact Person Linda Mills 



Moderator 



Vice Moderator 



Clerk 



Treasurer 



Music Director 



WMU Director 



Evangelism 



Stewardship 



Arvil Hardy 



Glen Luttrell 



Linda Mills 



Edith Gryder 



Discipleship Training Charles Craig 



Pauline Eldreth 



Eunice Luttrell 



George Berry 



Lmda Mills 



Finance Committee Edith Gryder 



Nominating Committee George Berry 



(828)295-3410 872 Edmisten Rd. 

Blowing Rock, NC 28605 

(828) 295-7095 1 59 Hollifield Rd. 

Blowing Rock, NC 28605 

(336) 973-7460 1 747 Summit Rd. 

Pulear, NC 28665 

(828) 295-7732 1 32 Collins Store Rd. 

Blowng Rock, NC 28605 

(828) 295-7095 1 59 Hollifield Rd. 

Blowing Rock, NC 28605 

(828) 295-3410 872 Edmisten Rd. 

Blowing Rock, NC 28605 

(828) 264-2532 1645 ShuUs Mill Rd. 

Boone, NC 28607 

(828) 264-2532 567 Grand Blvd. 

Boone, NC 28607 

(828) 295-7732 1 32 Collins Store Rd. 

Blowing Rock, NC 28605 

(828) 297-1223 709 Laurel Creek Rd. 

Sugar Grove, NC 28679 

(828) 295-7095 1 59 Hollifield Rd. 

Blowing Rock, NC 28605 

(828) 295-3410 872 Edmisten Rd. 

Blowing Rock, NC 28605 

(828) 297-1223 709 Laurel Creek Rd. 

Sugar Grove, NC 28679 



ANNUAL MEEXmG - 2001 AUGUST ,0. SANDY FLAT AUGUST ■ BAILEY'S CAMP 



1 



REPORTS 



VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL 



I did not receive a report from all of the churches so I am not 
sure how many churches actually had VBS this year. 

Those churches reporting were Sandy Flat, with an average 
attendance of 47, Bailey's Camp, with an average attendance of 32 
and Rock Spring with an average attendance of 69. This is a total 
of 148 children and adults involved in Vacation Bible School for 
the year 2000. 

What we cannot calculate is how many lives may be changed because 
someone attended Vacation Bible School at one of our churches. 

We really need to train our children who attend church, but the 
most important thing we do through VBS, is to reach those children 
who never attend church at any other time. 

Please let me encourage you to begin now to plan to have VBS next 
year at your church if you did not do so this year. 

If you need any information or help planning VBS, just let me know 
and I will be happy to help in any way I can. 



2 



God at work 
from 1845 
to 1999 



The Southern Baptist Convention was 
formed in 1845 for the primary purpose 
of establishing two mission boards, the 
Foreign Mission Board and the 
Domestic Mission Board (which later 
became the Home Mission Board and 
now the North American Mission Board). 
This was precipitated by controversy 
with northern Baptists over the issue of 
appointing slave owners as 
missionaries. 

The Foreign Mission Board's 
headquarters were located in Richmond, 
Virginia, and its first commissioning 
service was held on June 15, 1846, at 
Richmond's Second Baptist Church. 
Since then, more than 13,000 
missionaries have been appointed, one- 
third of whom are in active service 
today. 



The Intemationai 
Mission Board 
(formerly Foreign 
Mission Board) is an 
agency of the 
Southern Baptist 
Convention, the 
nation's largest 
evangelical 
denomination, 
claiming more than 
40,000 churches with 
nearly 16 million 
members. 

The board's main 
objective is 
presenting the gospel 
of Jesus Christ in 
order to lead 
individuals to saving 
faith in Him and result 
in church-planting 
movements among all 
the peoples of the 
world. 



Unprecedented results 

God is worlcing in unprecedented ways through Southern Baptists 
and Baptist partners overseas with whom 1MB missionaries are 
affiliated. Last year 348,635 baptisms were reported and 4,251 
churches were started on mission fields around the world. The total 
membership of overseas Baptist churches exceeded 4.4 million in 
1998. 



VENEZUELA 



MASSIVE LANDSLIDES OPEN 
HEARTS TO CHRIST'S LOVE 



3 



God is at work in Venezuela in the aftermath of horrible 
landslides that killed at least 40,000 people and left 
400,000 homeless. 

A five-member assessment team-sent to identify ways 
Baptists can share God's love with people suffering from 
the catastrophe-was overwhelmed by what they saw in the 
disaster zone. 

In Maiquetia, team members examined extensive damage 
to Light and Truth Baptist Church. A torrent of water, mud 
and rock had cut a 300-foot-wide swath through the 
neighborhood behind the church, wiping out everything in 
its path. 

In eastern Miranda state, residents of Rio Chico said a 30- 
foot wall of water swept through the town after a dam on a 
nearby reservoir broke. At Nuevo Guapo, brush and debris 
on the power lines indicated the flood there had been at 

least 20 feet deep. 

"It's incredible to think that in one evening so many homes 
were destroyed and lives lost," said missionary Rich 
Hutchens. "It would be the equivalent of losing every home 
in Birmingham or Louisville, along with 50,000 men, women 
and children, literally overnight." 

Daniel Ojeda, pastor of Bethesda Baptist Church in Catia 
la Mar, chose to stay behind to help organize relief efforts 
when his wife and children were evacuated. He reported he 
had shown the JESUS film in several places the week 
before the landslides, and every community he had worked 
in was completely destroyed. No homes remained, and 
none of the mission points there was functioning. 

The trauma has left deep scars, Hutchens said. 

Just before Christmas, a clown troupe from Caracas 
churches presented a skit to about 30 children who had 
lost their homes in the landslide. When one of the 
performers said the word "rain," the children burst into 
tears, and the group had to move quickly to another 
activity. 

The International Mission Board released $80,000 to help 
purchase food, water, medicines and mattresses that were 
to be distributed by missionaries and Venezuelan Baptists 
through a network of Baptist churches in the disaster area. 

Pray that the ministry and witness opportunities created by 
the landslide will bear fruit for God's kingdom. 



4 



STEWARDSinP/COOPERATIVE PROGRAM 



In years past I have reported on stewardship in relationship to talents and time but today I am going to the 
"bottom line" and report on what God expects you to do with your money. 

My scripture reference is 2 Corinthians, chapters 7 and 8 and I will point out the 7 principas for Christian 
Stewardship from this scripture, written b}' Paul to the church at Corinth. 

1 . Responsibility - it is the responsibility of each of us as Christians to support the local church and all the 
ministries undertaken by it, whether it be local, state or foreign missions or addressing any other need that 
might be brought before the assembly. 

2. Personal Commitment - just as our calling from God is personal, our giving is also personal. God 
blesses each of us in a unique way. He expects us to be commited to giving and speaks to each of us in a 
personal way. I cannot give for you and you cannot give for me. 

3. Attitude - Paul spoke of the attitude of the people of Macadonia as they gave to support his mission work 
and the work of others. Remember, we are to be cheerful givers. God does not want us to give for any 
other reason but because we love him, not because we expect something in return. 

4. Willingness - we should give freely and willingly. God knows our hearts and minds. 

5. Proportionate giving - God said "to whom much is given, much is expected". We are all so blessed 
today and could do so much more for the woric of the Lord than we do. Do our livestyles show that we are 
giving God his portion? 

6. Sacrifice - this goes along with #5. Paul spoke of what a sacrifice it was for the people of Macadonia 
and other churches to send so much. If we are not willing to give God His proportion, we certainly aren't 
willing to give sacrifically. There is an old adage that goes "live simply so that others may simply live". 
We need to share all those wonderflil blessings from Him. 

7. Systematic giving - what better system to use for giving than through the local church, putting our tithes 
to work where they will meet the most needs. Hopefully, the local church will participate in the 
Cooperative Program, where our tithes will be used to reach even a greater area of needs. 

The Cooperative Program marks its 75 Anniversary this year and a national emphasis is underway to 
celebrate this historic event. Partners in Harvest is recognizing the Cooperative Program's history and 
accomplishments, and the men and women who have taken the message of salvation to a lost and dying 
world. 

Also, Partners in Harvest casts a new vision for Southern Baptist missions. As we enter the 2 1st century, 
the need for missions has never been more acute, the opportunities never greater. With all our evangelistic 
emphasis, there are still millions who have never heard the name of Jesus except as a swear word. This may 
be the greatest missions effort in Southern Baptist History. 



5 



STEWARDSHIP REPORT 



OFFERING 1999 2000 

COOPERATIVE PROGRAM 6,289 6,540 

ASSOC. MISSIONS 4,141 5,071 

STATE MISSIONS 1,396 1,660 

ANNIE ARMSTRONG 1,927 2,781 

LOTTIE MOON 3,144 3,143 

OTHER SBC MISSIONS 10,845 8,668 

NON-SBC MISSIONS 24,088 13,608 

TOTAL 51,830 34,931 



6 



Council on Christian Higher Education 

Baptist State Convention of North Carolina 

2000 



Campbell University 

Buies Qeek, NC 27506 
Norman A. 'Wiggini, President 
(800) 334-4111 
www.campbell.edu 



Chowan College 

Murfreesboro, NC 28755 
Stanley G. Lort, President 
(800) 488-4101 
www.chowan.edu 



Gardner- Webb University 

Boiling Springs, NC 28017 
M. Christopher White, President 
(800) 253-6472 
www.gardner-webb.edu 



Mars Hill College 

Mars Hi]], NC 28754 
A. Max Lennon, President 
(800) 543-1514 
www.nihc.edu 



Wingate University 

Wingate,NC 28174 
Jerry E. McGee, President 
(800) 755-5550 
ww^^ wingate.edu 



Fraternal Institutions 

Meredith College 

Raleigh, NC 27607 
Maureen Hartford, President 
(800) 637-3348 
www.meredith.edu 



Wake Forest University 

Winston-Salem, NC 27109 
Thomas K. Ream, President 
(800) 393-4244 
www.wfu.edu 



Qiristian higher education represents one of our enduring values as North Carolina 
Baptists. From the founding of our Convention in 1830, we have supported Christian 
higher education. Oui- churches, associations, and state have benefited as a result. 

Last year North Carolina Baptists provided special scholarship assistance to members 
from our churches who chose to attend one of our affiliated colleges or universities. 
Sixt}'--eight out of eighty associations were represented among the hundreds of students 
who received this special Convention sponsored scholarship assistance. 

The institutions matched the Convention's support of these Baptists students through 
institutional support. For evtry dollar provided to students through the Cooperative 
Program, the institutions matched it with $2.50 of additional financial assistance. Fony-- 
five percent (45%) of the on-campus student populations are Baptists. 

In addition to support of undergraduates. North Carolina Baptists assisted 297 divinit}^ 
school students last year. This financial assistance was made possible through churches 
giving through optional giving Plans B and C. Members from our churches who have 
sensed God's call upon their lives to serve as ministers or missionaries are eligible to 
receive a theological educational grant from the Convention. 

If a student punues their degree from the divinity schools at Gardner- "Webb or 
Campbell, the smdent is eligible to receive a grant of $8,100. If a student pursues his or 
her theological education from other institutions, the student is eligible to receive a grant 
of $3,000 for their studies. . 

Reverend Shane Kirby recently graduated from the M. Christopher White School of 
Divinity at Gardner- Webb University. Upon graduation, Mr. Kirby said, "/ oonddnt be 
rrare happy that I ims aUe to obtain my rmster's at a North Carolina Baptist institutiM I look at it 
like the Baptists (fthis state imjested in me. Nou; I fed a sense (f responsibility to the good people cf 
my denonination to sene than " 

North Carolina Baptists can take pride in graduates, like Mr. Kirby, who want to serve 
our Lord and his churches in North Carolina. 

Without the faithful support of the Cooperative Mission Budget of the Baptist State 
Convention, opportunities for our members to attend Campbell, Chowan, Gardner- 
Webb, Mars HlU or Wingate would not be possible. 

Thank you North Carolina Baptists for your continued support of Christian higher 
education in our state. 



Council on Christian Higher Education, PO Box 1107, Gary, NC 27512-1107 
919-467-5100 ext. 185/ 800-395-5102 ext. 185/ wwike@bscnc.org 



7 



Annual J^inanciai Kepori, 
btony Jork baptis"C Association 
Aug. 11, ZDUiJ 



Balance July 31, 1999: $4688.91 



Contributions : 





General Fund 


--Bailey's (Jamp 


2 bUU.Ou 


--Doe Ridge 


416 . 00 


- -Lay town 


315,00 


--Mu. Ephriam 


500 . 00 


--Rock Spring 


1669.^0 


--Sandy Flat 


2051 . 39 


- -Offering-Executive 


162 . 82 



committee meeting 
--Baptist State 118.4b 
Convention 



Total 



Expenditures : 

--Roy Gryder (DOM expense) 
--Linda Mills (Clerk Hon) 
--Edith Gryder ( Treas . Hon.) 
--Precision Printing (minutes) 
--WMQ Expenses 
--Christian Action League 
--Hurricane Floyd Relief 
--Hur. Fid. Relief workers 
--Mozambique Relief 
--Furniture (Mrs . McGuire ) 



Contributions: $ 5852 . 87 
Total 10441.7 8 



$381 , 


. 97 


250 . 


, 00 


250 , 


. 00 


352 , 


. 98 


60 , 


. 00 


200 , 


, 00 


1500 , 


. 00 


100 , 


. 00 


600 , 


.00 


250, 


, 00 



Total expenditures: 3 944 . 95 

Balance in Treasure July 31, 2000 $ 6496.83 



8 



Stony Fork Baptist Association 
Approved budget 
2000-2001 



Director of Missions (expense) $ 900.00 

Clerk honorarium 250.00 

Treasure honorarium 250.00 

VBS 250.00 

Discipleship training 150.00 

Sunday School 100.00 

Evangelism (including conf . ) 350.00 

WMU 450.00 

Convention (6 persons) 600.00 

Clerical 50.00 

Minutes 400.00 

Christian Action League 200.00 

Assistance for disaster relief 200.00 

workers from our association 

Benevolent fund 1000 . 00 

$5150.00 



Persons being aware of emergency needs should contact the DOM who 
will contact the pastors of each church for approval rather than 
waiting until the next scheduled meeting time. 



9 



NORTH AMERICAN MISSION BOARD 
1 9 M I N IS TRY REPORT 



Reaching The Cities 

One of the most significant changes of the twentieth century was the urbanization 
of America. Between 1940 and 1990, metropolitan areas in the United States grew 
as niuch as 500 percent. Today, 150 million people live in our 50 largest citi^c The 
top 20 cities in the United States are projected to grow 30 to 70 percent ove7the 
next 20 years. 

But ministry and witness efforts have not kept pace with this phenomenal growth 
While Southern Baptists have seen tremendous increases, little of that growth has 
been in the major cities of the United States and Canada. 

Strategic Focus Cities is a strategy for allocating spiritual, human, and financial 
resources to our major urban areas. NAMB is developing local strategies with state 
conventions and association partners in the highest priority cities. In 1999 those 
plans included: ' 

• Development of prayer networks within the six selected cities and across North 
America to assure that the initiatives are supported by intercessory prayer. 

• Promotion and recruitment of thousands of volunteers for the priority cities 
designated for 2000-Chicago and Phoenix-and plans for evangelistic media 
opportunities in those cities. 

onn-f "d^"^"^ strategies have been developed for the priority cities designated for 
2001, Boston and Las Vegas, while organization and planning are underway for 
Seattle and Philadelphia, priorities in 2002. 

• Partnerships with some of Southern Baptists' largest churches will help plant four 
flagship churches in each metropolitan area. These churches, with proven records of 
reaching people in their own cities, are committed to bringing their experience to 
reaching the cities, mobilizing lay volunteers, and providing financial and prayer 
support to the church planting partnerships. 

cit^es^^'°" of future Strategic Focus Cities will come from the remaining 10 priority 



Los Angeles, Calif. 

San Diego, Calif. 

San Francisco/Oakland, Calif. 

Montreal, Canada 

Toronto, Canada 

Washington, D.C. 

Miami, Fla. 

Detroit, Mich. 

New York, N.Y. 

Cleveland, Ohio 



Our Mission 

The North American 
Mission Board (NAMB) 
exists to proclaim the 
gospel of Jesus Christ, 
start New Testament 
congregations, minister 
to persons in the name 
of Christ, and assist 
churches in the United 
States and Canada in 
effectively performing 
these functions. 



Our Vision 

We see a day when 
every person in every 
community in the Unitei 
States and Canada will 
have the opportunity to 
hear the gospel, responi 
with faith in Christ, and 
participate in a New 
Testament fellowship of 
believers. 



10 



Baptist Children's Homes of North Carolina 



"Quality Service Througii Quality Relationsiiips" is not just a slogan. It is a foundation- 
al statement of philosophy. In our ministry, relationships are everything — relationships with 
children, with families, with placement agencies, with our own families and churches, and with 
each other We are blessed by God in this work because we honor God in relationships. 

During the QSTQR emphasis, all BCH staff at ever}' ministry point have made extra efforts 
to strengthen relationships with the people we encounter We have incorporated the terms qual- 
ity, service and relationships into a plan of action. We have reflected our desire for quality 
relationships in ever3^hing we do in order to deliver quality services that change lives. QSTQR, 
celebrating the mission ... the millennium ... the ministr}', was BCH's theme from Easter, 
1999 through Thanksgiving, 2000. 

Through Baptist Children's Homes of North Carolina, hundreds of children and families are 
given new hope for their futures. . . 

Children like Linda and her two younger sisters. Linda feared for their 
well being. It was her responsibility to care for her sisters. Linda remembers 
moving to a shelter where she finally felt they were safe; there was enough 
food for the sisters and warm beds. The three children were later placed at 
BCH. Now, Linda is in a place where others care for her. Linda has discov- 
ered God cares for her, too. 

The McDonalds found the challenge of being a blended family difficult 
at times. Their son began to exhibit anger toward his parents. He would 
challenge their authority and began getting in trouble with some neighbor- 
hood kids. The situation was getting out of control. Corey's parents called 
BCH, where they a found a staff willing to embrace their family with hope. 
Today, Corey has begun to deal with his anger, mistrust and behavior issues. 
His parents are learning how to better communicate with each other and 
with Corey. 

During the past year, BCH served 1800 children and families through 13 facilities 
statewide. BCH operates residential campuses in Thomasville, Pembroke, Kinston and Clyde; a 
maternity home in Asheville; a teen mother/baby home in Lenoir; values change homes for girls 
in Franklin and Lenoir; therapeutic camping for boys in Cameron; emergency care cottages at 
the residential campuses and in Waynesville and Asheville; and a model day care center in 
Thomasville. 

In 2000, BCH began a new, innovative ministry caring for developmentally disabled adults 
and their families. Our Trustees unanimously approved a major undertaking this year by com- 
mitting more than $3.5 million to replace, repair, construct and make-much needed improve- 
ments at every BCH location. Most of the work is complete. You are invited to visit our cam- 



11 



puses and other facilities to see first hand the difference you are helping us to make. 

The commitment to quality has been a cornerstone of this institution since its beginning. 
"Quality Service Through Qualit}' Relationships" was a 20-month public demonstration of 
this cornerstone. The emphasis places top priority on relationships to achieve the highest quali- 
ty of service possible. Significant growth has been realized during this period. BCH has dedi- 
cated new structures at Odum Home, Cameron Boys Camp, Kennedy Home, Broyhill and Mills 
Home campuses and added new work in Waynesville and Asheville as well as Moody Home, 
Care House, Noel Group Home. Several significant anniversaries have been observed: the 
85th of Kennedy Home in Kinston, the 30th of Baptist Maternity Home in Asheville, the 20th 
of Cameron Boys Camp, the 40th annual Western Area Conference, and the 115th anniversary 
of Baptist Children's Homes of North Carolina. 

To help commemorate BCH's 115th anniversary and to celebrate the impact QSTQR has 
had on staff and children, approximately 600 children, administrators, childcare workers, social 
workers and staff were brought together June 28, 2000 from around the state for a day of inspi- 
ration, fellowship, food and fun. "The Family Gathering" was held at Mills Home where 
BCH began in 1885. This is the first time all the Baptist Children's Homes' "family" have been 
together at the same place and at the same time. 

Baptist Children's Homes QSTQR emphasis will culminate at Thanksgiving. We invite you 
to attend BCH's 30 minute presentation at the 2000 annual meeting of the Baptist State 
Convention in Winston-Salem on Tuesday, November 14, 2000 at 2:10 pm. We encourage you 
to be part of our ambitious $1 million Thanksgiving Offering goal. That number may seem 
enormous, but there is also enonnous need. For all the good North Carolina Baptists are doing 
to help children and families, there is still so much that needs to be done. We are confident our 
churches will help us meet this important goal! 

The support of North Carolina Baptists through the Thanksgiving Offering, Cooperative 
Program, and individual gifts, memorials, honors, bequests and estate gifts help enable us fulfill 
our mission statement: "helping hurting children . . . healing broken families." 

North Carolina's "largest family" is grateful to North Carolina Baptists for prayers and 
support. To secure a video or a speaker for your church, or for information about our services, 
please call (336) 474-1209. - , ■ 

Michael C. Blackwell, President 

Ward F. Mullis, Chairman, Board of Trustees 



Baptist Children's Homes of North Carolina, Inc. 

R 0. Box 338, Thomasville, NC 27361-0338 Phone: (336) 474-1200 Web: www.bchfamily.org 
Michael C. Blackwell, president since 1983 

12 



The North Carolina Baptist Foundatioinj, Inc. 



The North Carolina Baptist 
Foundation, Inc. is the trust 
agency of the Baptist State 
Convention of North Carolina 
and was chartered in 1920 as 
the first Baptist Foundation in 
the United States. Under the 
guidance of the Holy Spirit, the 
mission of the Baptist 
Foundation is to serve North 
Carolina Baptists and others as 
they seek to financially 
undergird their churches, 
institutions and mission 
endeavors on a permanent 
basis. Responsibility for 
governing the Foundation is 
vested in a 20 member Board 
of Directors elected by the 
delegates of the Baptist State 
Convention. On December 31 , 
1999, the total market value of 



the assets managed by the 
Foundation were in excess of 
S93 million. 

The assets managed are 
typically held as common 
investment funds to aid in 
providing diversity and 
professional money 
management. Money 
managers operate under the 
investment policy set forth by 
the Board of Directors. 

The Foundation has 
employed The Consulting 
Group, a wholly owned 
subsidiary of Salomon Smith 
Barney, to assist the Board in: 

Developing and 
employing appropriate 
asset allocation 
strategies 



Performing ongoing due 
diligence and analysis 
on money management 
firms 

Selecting money 
management firms to 
manage Foundation 
assets 

Monitoring results to 
provide assurance that 
investments meet policy 
objectives with regard 
to hsk and return 
Guarding against 
investments in assets 
contrary to Baptist faith 
and beliefs 

Coordinating the entire 
investment process for 
the Foundation. 



The common funds administered by The North Carolina Baptist Foundation, 
Inc., as of December 31, 1999, are as follows: 



Growth Fund 


Balanced Fund 


Income Fund 


Fixed Income Fund 


The investment objective of the 
Growth Fund is long-term 
growth of principal with 
minimal emphasis on current 
income. Assets may be invested 
in equities, fixed income and 
cash equivalent securities. The 
preferred asset mix is 80% 
equities/20% fixed income with 
the target return over a ten- 
year horizon of 11% on an 
annual basis. This fund is 
typical for permanent 
endowments where payments 
are made from earned income 
and realized gains. 


The investment objective of the 
Balanced Fund is long-term 
growth of principal with 
emphasis on current income. 
Assets may be invested in 
equities, fixed income and cash 
equivalent securities. The 
preferred asset mix is 50% 
equities/50% fixed income with 
the target return over a ten- 
year horizon of 9% on an 
annual basis. This fund is 
typical for fixed payment 
accounts where payments may 
be made from earned income, 
realized gains and principal, if 
necessary. 


The investment objective of the 
Income Fund is current income 
with minimal emphasis on 
long-term growth of principal. 
Assets may be invested in 
equities, fixed income and cash 
equivalent securities. The 
preferred asset mix is 80% 
fixed income/20% equities 
with the target return over a 
ten-year horizon of 7% on an 
annual basis. This fund is 
typical for net income type 
accounts where payments may 
be made from earned income 
and realized gains. 


The investment objective of the 
Fixed Income Fund is maximum 
income and minimal principal 
fluctuation. Assets may be 
invested in fixed income securities 
and cash equivalent securities with 
the highest targeted weight on the 
fixed income securities portion. 
This fund is typical for fixed 
income accounts that are 
revocable. 



13 



Disclosure of Assets Managed 
as of December 31, 1999 



The Foundation provides a 
mid-year and end of year 
accounting report for each 
account it holds, information 
on the reports includes gifts, 
distributions, expenses, and 
book and market values for the 
reporting period. More 
frequent reports are available 
upon request. 

Earnings on the investments 
are allocated to the accounts 
monthly. Distributions to 
beneficiaries are made in 
accordance with the governing 
document. 

Common funds managed by 
the Foundation are exempt 
from registration requirements 
of the federal securities laws, 
pursuant to the exemption for 
collective investment funds and 
similar funds maintained by 
charitable organizations under 
The Philanthropy Protection 
Act of 1995 (P.L.104-62). 
Fund managers for the Growth 
Fund, Balanced Fund and 
Income Fund are: 

Large Growth Equity: 

Alliance Capital 

Management 
Large Value Equity: 

Boston Safe Advisors 
International Equity: 

Invesco Capital 

Management 



Small/Mid Cap Value Equity: 

Phvate Capital 

Management 
Fixed Income: 

Seix Investment 

Advisors 
The fund manager for the 
Fixed Income Fund is the 
Southern Baptist Foundation. 

The North Carolina Baptist 
Foundation, Inc. is partially 
supported by the Cooperative 
Program of the Baptist State 
Convention of North Carolina. 
Primary financial support 
comes from the administrative 
fees charged proportionally to 
each account being managed. 
Funds managed in 1999 for or 
on behalf of individuals were 
charged an annual 
administration fee based on 
1% of the market value of the 
fund assets. Churches and 
other Baptist institutions and 
agencies in 1 999 were charged 
an administration fee of one- 
half of 1 % of the market value. 
All fees are taken quarterly on 
a pro-rata basis. 

Professional investment 
managers and investment 
advisors may be retained by 
the funds, and may be 
compensated out of the assets 
of the common funds. Each 
donor is advised to consult his 
or her own advisors regarding 
the risks, tax treatments and 
other aspects of contributing to 
the Foundation. 



Charitable Gift ANNumES 

For individuals creating 
charitable gift annuities, much 
of the information in this 
disclosure will not be relevant. 
The obligation to make the 
annuity payment under the 
charitable gift annuity 
agreement will be backed by 
the general assets of the 
institution benefitting from the 
gift. 

The Foundation's policy is to 
maintain an unrestricted 
reserve at least equal to the 
current gift annuity 
obligations. In accordance 
with state requirements, the 
reserve will always be a 
minimum of $100,000. Based 
on actuarial tables, obligations 
on gift annuities for 1998 and 
1999 were $118,399 and 
$114,993 respectively. 

This annuity is not issued by 
an insurance company, is not 
subject to regulation by the 
State of North Carolina, and is 
not protected or otherwise 
guaranteed by any 
government agency or 
insurance guaranty fund. 




14 



DISCIPLESHIP TRAINING 



I have noticed through the years that there are some areas where 
our churches need training, especially our young people. Who will 
carry on the work when we are gone? Who will be Sunday School 
director in a few years? Who will make sure God's word" is being 
taught. Many people do not know how to conduct a business meeting, 
but God's word says things should be done in a decent manner. 

Many church doors will be closed because there is no one to carry 
on the work. In Ephesians 4:6-14, He gives us all gifts for the 
work of the ministry. In verse 14, He warns us about false 
doctrines and the craftiness of man, whereby we might be deceived. 

Who is going to proclaim that Jesus is the only way when others are 
teaching other ways? There is no other gospel except Jesus Christ 
and him crucified. Jesus is the head of the church and we are all 
equal in his sight. 

God gifted us with different kinds of ministry and all are equally 
important. We must teach and train all our people to be able to 
perform their ministries. He called us all to be missionaries n 
Matthew 28. If each of us would get one person to church next 
Sunday, see them saved, then the kingdom of God would grow. We are 
saved to be a servant. 

You never know when your are being a light for Christ because some 
one is always watching you. We need to walk worthy of the calling 
He has given us. We need to get back to teaching our people what 
the Bible says we are to do in our ministries. 

I think there is a need to teach and train our young people so they 
can teach their children so the work will continue as the Hebrew 
people did in the book of Deuteronomy. 



15 



WOMEN ON MISSION 



In Matthew 28 the Bible tells us we are all called to be 
missionaries. Called to reach the lost and to tr^- to get them into 
the local church where the pastor can nourish them and lead them to 
the Lord. 

When we take food for some one in need or flowers to some one who 
has suffered a loss, we should also share God's love with them. 
Sometimes just hearing some one loves them brings the most comfort 
in a time of sorrow. 

The women in all our churches should be working with the young 
girls, in GA's and Acteens and Mission Friends. They should also 
work with the boys if there is no Brotherhood organization, 
especially if a lot of boys are attending other church services. 

Our State Women on Mission office works with women in prisons and 
with their children. We are also involved in Scimatarian ' s Purse 
shoeboxes at Christmas. Women on Mission have be'^n involved with 
hurrican relief at the coast, following the devastating floods 
there . 

Our annual meeting was held at Ridgecrest where we were able to 
attend and meet our missionaries on a one to one basis. 



16 



Christian Action League of North Carolina 

6339 Glenwood Avenue, Ste. 442 
Raleigh. NC 27612 
(919) 787-0606 

ANNUAL REPORT TO THE ASSOCIATIONS 

2000 



It is with humble gratitude that the Christian Action League of North Carolina serves the Lord Jesus Christ and the churcties of 
this 2reat state as a Beacon of light, guiding referendums and legislation through the murky waters of special-interest groups and 
educatina God's people about the moral problems in our state and nation. Our goal is to encourage and organize the people of God so thai 
our li2ht\viU-be seen brightly throughout our state; and when we speak, it will be in one accord and will resound loudly. 

A. Christian Values 

va. The Christian Action League again co-sponsored the Fifth Annual Christian Heritage Week of North Carolina held in 
March. It was our pleasure to provide awards for excellence to those high school students who won the essa\' contest on 
America's Christian background. 

../ b. CAL has continued to promote and distribute copies of the Ten Commandments throughout North Carolina. To date, 
over 15,000 copies have been mailed. 

.yc. Promoted awareness of worldwide persecution of Christians (particularly in Sudan) through email alerts and radio. 

d. Participated with the American Family Association in distributing copies of our national motto posters "In God We 
Trust". 

e. Joined with Family Life Ministries in promoting and distributing copies of the Marriage Covenant Certificates. 
■-^'f. Participated in the National Day of Prayer. 

g. Set up CAL exhibit at Baptist State Convention and the East and West Districts of the Wesleyan Church conferences. 

h. Worked in the General Assembly to stop a bill that would allow physicians to take immediate custody of a child that 
they felt had been abuseci. The bill died in committee. 

B. Radio 

"Christians In Action", Station WAGO (88.7 FM) Snow Hill, started Monday, January 3, 2000. This broadcast consists of a 
five-minute commentary on issues that affect our lives today. We will begin airing this program on Aug. 7 on New Bern 
(WAAE, 91.9 FM). Our projection is to ultimately reach the whole state. 

C. Gambling 

'-■4. Video Poker Machines - The Christian Action League worked round the clock to get video poker banned in this state. 
We failed getting the ban but were successful in getting SB 1542 to strengthen the law and restrict the operation and 
expansion of video gambling in the state. We will work vehemently next session in pushing for a ban. 

b. Joined Christian Coalition in survey on how Gubernatorial candidates stood on lottery/released results in newsletter. 

c. Next session the Christian Action League will be on the front line in the Legislature fighting a state-sponsored lottery. 

D. Abortion 

a. CAL has purchased the rights through donations of a surgical procedure on a 21 -week old fetus that proves that partial- 
birth abortion is murder. We want to see this picture used extensively in making our case for the pro-life agenda. 

b. CAL participated in the Right to Life Rally held in Raleigh. 

E. Alcohol 

a. Participated in four LBD campaigns since Januan,' 1 1, 2000, and there are three scheduled for a September referendum. 
We help with their organizational meetings, rallies and providing educational materials. 

b. Worked in the General Assembly for passage of HB 1499-Interlock/Open Container law. This bill bans open alcohol 
containers in the passenger area of a motor vehicle on the highway or highway r'ght-of-way. The bill was ratified on 
July 13. 

E. Pornography 

Have produced and aired several radio programs to inform the public of the internet pornography crisis. Educate 
communities on how they can rid their neighborhoods of adult establishments. 
G. Homosexuaiiiy 

CAL monitors and informs the Christian community of the current homosexual agenda through our email alert. 

The Christian Action League of North Carolina produces a quarterly newsletter The Beacon that has a distribution of over 21,000. We 
also send out an email alert every Friday to over 150 members to keep them abreast of current moral, ethical and political issues that 
affect our state and nation. All services of the Christian Action League are provided at no charge. We depend on God's people to provide 
for His work. 




Working For A Better North Carolina 



Reverend Mark H. Creech /' / Joe S. Lennon 

Executive Director - ^ President 



17 



Baptist Retirement Homes: 
"A Half-Century of Service'' 

In March 2001, the Baptist Retirement 
Homes of North Carohna will celebrate 50 years 
of service to Older Adults, It has been a wonder- 
ful half-centurj', and the "Homes" is thankful for 
the privilege of sharing in the Ufe journeys of 
thousands of "Aging Saints." 

The quahty of life the "Homes" has 
brought to these Older Adults has been its best 
measure of success as it has helped ensure that 
residents live out their Uves with autonomy 
dignity, and comfort. The "Homes'" dream is to 
make life for North Carohna Older Adults what 
God intended it to be... "The Best of Times." 

The "Homes" corporation now owns 
and operates four retirement communities 
across the state: the Brookridge Retirement 
Community m Winston-Salem, a contmmng care 
community offermg independent living, assisted 
hviiig and nursing care; the Western North 
Carohna Home in Asheville, a community that 
offers assisted hving and nursing care; and the 
Hamilton Home in Hamilton and The Taylor House m Albemarle, communities that offer assisted hvmg services. 
Later this year the "Homes" will begin construction on a new community — The Gardens of Taylor Glen, a continu- 
ing care community near Concord. 

The generous support the "Homes" has received from North Carohna Baptists has enabled it to make a unique 
promise to its residents: whatever the future may hold, Baptist Retirement Homes will care for them for the rest 
of their lives Keeping this promise means overcoming many challenges. By 2020 North Carohnians past retirement 
age wiU make up 20 percent of the population. Wliile medical science has prolonged hfe, the effects of aging are 
often intensffied and extended over many years. Many Older Adults exhaust their personal resources and look to the 
"Homes" for significant financial assistance. 

Still Baptist Retirement Homes stands ready 
to make good its promise of ongomg compassionate Whatever the future may hold, 

and quahty care. Baptist Retirement Homes will care for 

its residents for the rest of their Uves. 




For almost 50 years, the front porch has been a favorite 
spot of residents and guests at The Taylor House in 
Albemarle. This residence is an assisted living community 
made possible by the gifts of North Carolina Baptists. 



Baptist Elder Care Network 

A statewide system of resource counselors answering 

questionsrelatedto the needs of aging persons — 
A free service provided by Baptist Retirement Homes ' -800-887-74 1 




18 



RESOLUTIONS 



Let it be resolved that the Stony Fork Association wishes to thank 
and express their appreciation to Mt. Ephraim and Rock Spring 
church for the wornderful hospitality and fellowship that we 
enjoyed so much, also for the delicious food. We want to thank God 
for the Moderator, Director of Missions, and all the speakers who 
gave informative and interesting reports. 



OBITUARIES 



Bailey's Camp — Langston Tolbert 



Mt . Ephraim 



Johnny Miller 



Rock Spring 



Virgie Hall 



Sandy Flat 



Inez Loudermelt and Belle Holdaway 



19 



PROCEEDINGS 



PROCEEDINGS 
OF THE ONE HUNDRED AND THIRTY NINTH 
ANNUAL MEETING OF STONY FORK ASSOCIATION 
AUGUST 11, 2000 
MT. EPHARAIM 

Call to Order by the moderator, Roy Kanupp. 

Many special requests for prayer, led by the moderator. 

Song - Hand in Hand with Jesus. 

Devotion - Garett Mahaffney from John 14:1-7. Jesus 
said "I am the way". Some people think they can work t 
their way into heaven, but there is only one way. 

Adoption of Program. Moved to adopt all reports, 
seconded and approved. 

Recognition of new pastors and workers - Roy Kanupp, 
Rock Spring, Garett Mahaffrey, fill in at Mt. Ephraim, 
George Berry at Sandy Flat. 

Vacation Bible School - Glen Luttrell 

International Missions - Eunice Luttrell. Remember to 
pray for our missionaries as they spread the gospel 
around the world. They give up so much to go to 
represent us. 

Stewardship/Cooperative Program - Linda Mills 

Evangelism - Roy Kanupp. It is important that we get out 
there and work. You will never go wrong by spreading the 
gospel. Always pray that God will send you somewhere to 
preach. We don't need to ask the world for permission to 
preach or hand out tracts. We are answerable to God. 

Christian Higher Education - Roy Gryder 

Finance Report/Budget - Edith Gryder. Copies of the 
proposed budget were given out, to be approved tomorrow. 
The WMU director asked that money from last year that 
was not used be carried over to this year to be used 
for deposit at Ridgecrest. 

Break 

North American Missions - Eunice Luttrell 

North Carolina State Missions - Eunice Luttrell. The 
needs are great here in N.C. The Baptist Men's Disaster 
Van is often the first to arrive at the site of a 
disaster. Several of our men went to the coast to 
help rebuild homes devastated by the flood. 



20 



Roy Gryder reported that on September 17, 2000, he 
will be returning to the coast with another crew. 
This is being coordinated by the Baptist Men and he 
is not sure where they will be going this time. If 
you can go with them, let Roy know. 

10:40 Children's Homes - Report read by Linda Mills. 

10:50 Baptist Foundation - Pauline Eldreth. 

Roy Gryder suggested that the association think about 
condensing the annual meeting into one day, reports 
in the morning and business meeting in the afternoon. 
Everyone is to think about this and will discuss more 
later. 

11:00 Song - Amazing Grace and It's A Grand And Glorious 

Feeling. 

11:05 Prayer 

11:10 Annual Message - Max West. The character and behavior of 

the church or the stages of the church, early, today and 
tomorrow. The early church is described in Acts 2: 41- 
47. The disciples were of one accord. Here we find the 
early church beginning with Christ. He called out and 
taught the disciples to be fishers of men. They began to 
grow and minister and to go out. Jesus said the church 
would do greater things than He had done. Its character 
was a people that believed in Jesus Christ and accepted 
His death for them. The early church began to grow, 3000 
added because of Peter's preaching and faith in Christ. 
They stood steadfast in their belief. There behavior was 
one of love and they did not "just give up" like we tend 
to do today. In Corinthians 13:8, love will never fail. 
I believe this same pattern the early church followed 
would still work today. Look at the impact the church 
has had in our lives individually and in our communities. 
God's type of love will get the job done. The early 
church loved one another. 

Today's Church - Today we are caught up and going in 
different directions and are not as close as we should 
be. Our behavior should be one of deep affection of 
others. To reach people, we mush have that love of God 
within us. People today need to be loved and cared for, 
not pushed down further. They need to know someone 
understands their needs. The early church gave to those 
in need, even selling all that they had and giving it to 
the needy. Today we should do the same to demonstrate 
Christ's love. The Bible says "love they neighbor as 
thyself". It we had that character and behavior today, 
our churches would grow. The devil likes to keep us busy 
so that we don't have time to get really involved in the 



21 



kind of church that the early church was. Families 
are not as close as they once were. We need to be 
closer to one another and closer to Christ. Wickedness 
and sin cause us to become cold and love and trust 
are destroyed. 

Tomorrow's Church -Is our love being passed on to our 
children and young people? Love, joy, peace, are all 
qualities we need to be most concerned about. We will 
need more of these fruits in our lives every day and even 
more so in years to come. People are growing apart, 
husbands, wives and children. Where do I fit in? Look 
at all the members of the church of the world and ask 
what is my character, my behavior and what will I do? 
How will I act as a member of Christ's body? It all 
comes back to the individual . The church began with 
Christ and grew one member at a time. Am I going to be 
a model christian in the years to come. In John 13:34-35 
a new commandment was give, to love one another as He 
loved us. In 1 Corinthians 13:1-13 we find the basis of 
our character and behavior, love never faileth, it will 
get the job done when nothing else will or can. 

12:00 Adjourn - Lunch 



22 



AUGUST 12, 2000 
ROCK SPRING 

8:30 Call to Order and prayer, Moderator, Roy Kanupp. 

8:35 Song - How Firm a Foundation. 



8 : 40 



8 :55 



9:00 



9 : 30 



9 : 40 



10:25 
10:30 



Devotion - Gary Triplett. Ephesians 4: 1-6. Unity 
of the spirit. We have one father and he is the 
father of us all. We are gathered here as brothers 
and sisters. Pray for our young people as I have 
a real burden for them. 

M?^"^T.^?"^-^-" ^^il^y's Camp 3, Doe Ridge 4, Laytown 3, 
Mt. Ephraim 0, Rock Spring 1, Sandy Flat 7. 

No report for Sunday School. 
Discipleship Training - Charles Craig. 



9:20 Women on Mission - Eunice Luttrell. 



Christian Action League - Dale Luttrell. The Beacon 
Magazine gives us further information on moral, 
ethical and political issues that affect our state 
an our lives. 

No General Board Report - may have a representative 
m the area. 

Annuity Board - Roy Gryder. Gave out pamphlets to 
each church represented. 

9:45 Special singing. 

10:00 Break 

10:15 Resolutions - Betty Woods. 

10:20 Obituaries - Clerk. 

Retirement Homes - Mamie Craig, (from yesterday). 

Business Meeting - Max West, Nominating Committee 
Chairman made the following nominations: Moderator - 
Arvil Hardy, Vice-Moderator - Glen Luttrell, Clerk - 

Training - Charles Craig, Music - Pauline Eldreth, 
Stewardship/Cooperative Program - Linda Mills, VBS/ 
Sunday School Glen Luttrell, Retirement Homes, Mamie 
Craig, Children's Homes - Arvil Hardy, Obituaries - 
Clerk, Baptist Hospital - Bonnie Walsh, Christian 



23 



Higher Education - Roy Gryder, Baptist Foundation - 
Pauline Eldreth., Mission Reports - WMU. Christian 
Action League - Dale Luttrell, Evangelism - George Berry 
Nominating Committee is the pastors of each church, 
Chairman, George Berry. Constitution and Bylaws 
Committee - Pastors of each church and Charles Craig. 
Finance Committee - Chairman, Edith Gryder, Eunice 
Luttrell, Arvil Hardy and Max West. 

There was much discussion about shortening the annual 
meeting next year to one day. Some reports will 
be dropped and some will be modified. Each 
church will discuss this over the coming year and 
will also be discussed at the quarterly meetings. 

It was moved, seconded and approved for the 
Constitution and Bylaws Committee and Program 
Committee meet 1 hour early next month before 
the quarterly meeting to discuss plans for the 
next annual meeting. 

Roy Gryder moved that the Program Committee recommend 
any reports to be dropped at the quarterly meeting 
in November. Seconded and approved. 

11:25 Moved, seconded and approved the budget for the 

2000 - 2001 year. 

Moved, seconded and approved for the local churches 
to let Roy Gryder know of any needs and he will 
notify the pastors so the association can help 
at the time needed. 

11:30 Adjourn Business Meeting. 

11:40 Annual Message - Roy Kanupp. John 21:1-12. Things we 

will find around God's table, nourishment, salvation, 
discernment of good and evil, righteousness, and 
restoration. In John 6:31 God gave them manna from 
heaven in the desert. He gave them physical nourishment 
but through Jesus, He gave us spiritual nourishment. 
Have you truly tasted the bread of life? You can't fall 
from grace if you are in God's hands. 1 Peter 2:2 we 
find a new christian has to be nurtured and fed because 
he is a baby in Christ. Everything a new christian 
needs to help them grow is in the word. 

In Hebrews 5:11 we find that if you are not weaned from 
the milk, you will not hear what the meat of the word 
says. John 13:23 - At God's table there will be 
fellowship withe the Son and he will feed us forever. 
When God sees under His table. He won't see our 
disabilities. He will see only His Son in us. 



24 



There will be no empty seats at God's table, they 
will all be filled. Luke 22:17 - Coinmunion will be 
held at God's table and with Him. Gather around God's 
table and be healthy spiritually. Mark 16:7. 
Restoration - Jesus told Peter to strengthen the 
breathern. If you have been away from God's table 
too long, come back and be restored. 

12:30 Adjourn - Lunch 



25 



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HISTORY AND HISTORICAL TABLE 



HISTORY AND HISTORICAL TABLE 



Year Churches 



Moderator 



Clerk 



Preacher 



1862 

1863 
1864 
1865 
1866 
1867 
1868 
1869 
1870 
1871 
1872 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1892 
1893 
1894 
1895 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 



Zions Gate Meeting Larkin Hodges Larkin Pipes 
House, Wilkes Co. 

Yellow Hill Larkin Hodges 

Minutes were not printed, manuscript 



Mt. Ephraim 
South Fork 
Watauga 
Union 
Stony Fork 
Old Field 
Elk 

Mt. Vernon 
Watauga 
Yellow Hill 
Laurel Fork 
Stony Fork 
Poplar Grove 
Old Field 
Elk 

Mt. Vernon 
Watauga 
Mt. Ephraim 
Yellow Hill 
Boones For 
Buffalo Cove 
Stony Fork 
Union 

Laurel Fork 
Poplar Grove 
Mt. Vernon 
Watauga 
Mt. Paran 
Boones Fork 
Yellow Hill 
New River 
Elk 

Laurel Fork 
Buffalo Cove 
Mt. Vernon 
Watauga 



Larkin Hodges 
Larkin Hodges 
Larkin Hodges 
Larkin Hodges 
Larkin Hodges 
Larkin Hodges 
Larkin Hodges 
Larkin Hodges 
Larkin Hodges 
Larkin Hodges 
Larkin Hodges 
Larkin Hodges 
Larkin Hodges 
Larkin Hodges 
Larkin Hodges 
Larkin Hodges 
Larkin Hodges 
J.F. Eller 
J.F. Eller 
Larkin Hodges 
J.F. Eller 
E.M. Gragg 

E. M. Gragg 
James Parsons 

F. M. Gragg 
E.M. Gragg 
E.M. Gragg 
E.M. Gragg 
E.M. Gragg 
E.M. Gragg 
E.M. Gragg 
E.M. Gragg 
E.M. Gragg 
J.C. Miller 
E.M. Gragg 
E.M. Gragg 



Larkin Pipes 
got lost 
J.R. Hodges 
Elijah Trivette 
James Parsons 
James Parsons 
James Parsons 
James Parsons 
James Parsons 
James Parsons 
James Parsons 
W.E. Greene 
W.E. Greene 
W.E. Greene 
Elijah Trivette 
W.E. Greene 
W.E. Greene 
W.E. Greene 
Elijah Trivette 
John R. Hodges 
Elijah Trivette 
Thomas Pipes 
Thomas Pipes 
Wm. M. Lee 
Wm. M. Lee 
Wm. M. Lee 
Wm. M. Lee 
Wm. M. Lee 
Wm. M. Lee 
Wm. M. Lee 
Wm. M. Lee 
Wm. M. Lee 
Wm. M. Lee 
Wm. M. Lee 
Wm. M. Lee 
Wm. M. Lee 
R.H. Pipes 
Wm. M. Lee 



Li'm kin Hodges 

Wilson Bradshaw 

Jo<!eph Harrison 
Larkin Hodges 
J.R Carlton 
J? nes Parsons 
W H. Phillips 
W illiam Wilcox 
Ja mes Parsons 
J \ L Carlton 
Larkin Hodges 
James Parsons 
Levi Wilson 
L2 rkin Hodges 
James Parsons 
J.R. Carlton 
Monroe Gragg 
Monroe Gragg 
Levi Wilson 
James Parsons 
L J rkin Hodges 
L.fi 2-kin Pipes 
J.I. Eller 
E.M. Gragg 
D * /id Eller 
Wii. M. Lee 
J())m F. Eller 
lii M. Gragg 
J C. Miller 
E.M. Gragg 
S.T. Carroll 
John F. Eller 
Geo. W. Trivette 
J.C. Miller 
W.M. Lee 
J.F. Davis 
J F. Sherwood 
J). C. Harman 



LyUl 


SiOny rOrK 


T C IVfillpi- 
tf. iTXiiicr 


■Wrn A/f T <»<» 
TT III. ItX. 1-dCC 


tlUIIII v^risp 




X opiar vriove 


T C Millpr 


A T <ihiil 1 


T C Ttlnvlnrk 

tj. XflajlUCK 






X; . ITX. VTl 


VL/m A/T T pp 

TT III. ITX. X^CC 


T C Millpr 


1 Qt\A 


1VJ.I. jiipnr<tiiii 


F TVI C^fitao 

S: . ITX. Vjrl 


Wm AT T ,pp 

▼ T III. xTX. X^CC 


X • J.TX* VTI 


1 Qn^ 


A/If T*«ii*on 
iTll. s: Al all 


F AT f^fiioo 

X^. ITX. VJl 


Wm M T,pp 

TT 111. ItX. X^^^ 


Wm IVT T 

▼ T 111* ITX* XjC/C 




X ciiuw niii 


X IIUS. Xj« iJclj 


Wm AT T ,pp 

TT 111. ITX. X_iCC- 


XflUTTll 




i^cw xviver 


'FliAc T T^ov 

X litis. X_i. UAj 


\\^rri AT T PP 
TT III. ItX. J-/CC 


T F D5»vi« 

U • X • X/AVI3 


1 QOS 


IvxlUUlC \^allc 


T£ifiiAc F ^liiii*ph 


Wm AT T ,pp 

TT 111. ITX. X^VC 


T C Millpr 




Flk 

XLfllv 


Thn^ T, Dav 


Wm M lyPP 

tT 111* ITX. M-JK^K^ 


J C Miller 


1 Q1 n 


XjaUrcl -TOiK 


X IIUs. J-i. mJAj 


W/m AT T PP 

TT III. itX. XjCC 


Wm A/f T PP 

TT III. iTX. XjCC 




ivii. V ernon 


1 nos. 1-1. JL^ay 


\]i/m AT T AO 

w m. ivi. j_iee 


AT Whpolpi* 

If. ivi. w neeier 




Poplar Grove 


1 nos. j-i. i^ay 


W/m A/T T AO 

vt m. ivi. i^ee 


rv. r. wucox 




WHlHUg^ 


X IIUS. Lit -L'd.y 


l^.L?. XlallipiUll 


ii.o. xXallipiUIl 


1 Q1 d 


Mt. Ephraim 


Thos. L. Day 


Wm. M. Lee 


Wm AT T PP 

TT III. ITX. X_/CC 


1 Q1 ^ 


Boones Fork 


Thos. L. Day 


Wm. M. Lee 


D M Whpplpr 

X^. ITX. TT IICCICI 




Rock Spring 


B. F. Wilcox 


Wm. M. Lee 


Wm M TiPP 

TT 111* ±TX* X^V'^ 


1 Q1 7 


Mt. Paran 


B. F. Wilcox 


N.S. Hampton 




IQI^t 

x^x o 


Due to outbreak of influenza, no Association was held 




1919 

X ^ X ^ 


Yellow Hill 


B F Wilcox 


N S Hamnton 


B F Wilcox 

XF« X • TT llV^vA. 


1920 


IVft Vprnon 


B F Wilcox 


N S Hamnton 


IV S TTfimntnn 

1 ^ • XX A 111 CtJll 


1921 


X-iAUl ^1 X VI HI. 


B. F. Wilcox 


N S Hamnton 


D. M. Wheeler 




Watauffa 


B. F. Wilcox 


N. S. Hampton 


Ocrfir T)illincypt* 

V./9VAI XyillllliKV'I 


192"? 


Poplar Grove 


B. F. Wilcox 


N. S. Hampton 


IV S TTomritAn 

11 • O* XXtfllll L/lvIll 


1 924 


Boones Fork 


B. F. Wilcox 


J. A. Hampton 


W D A«!hlpv 

TT . X/. r\aIHCY 


1 92^ 


Mt. Ephraim 


B. F. Wilcox 


J.A. Hampton 


J. rv. xxduipiun 


1 Q26 


Rock View 


D. M. Wheeler 


J. A. Hampton 


fZ AT Wol-crkn 


1 07 
II'Z / 


Elk 


D. M. Wheeler 


R.F. Wilcox 


A.\^. xiamDy 




Watauga 


D. M. Wheeler 


B.F. Wilcox 


u. r . w iicox 




Sandy Flat 


D. M. Wheeler 


B.F. Wilcox 


Vx.ivi. w arson 


1 9*^0 


Middle Can 


W. D. Ashley 


B.F. Wilcox 


T .iflTIPV Tl<iT*npc 
X^IIIIICY XJdl IIO 


1 9*^1 


Laurel Fork 


W.D. Ashley 


B.F. Wilcox 


R F Wilrnv 

X>.X^ • TT IIv.UA 


1932 


New Hopewell 


G.M. Watson 


B.F. Wilcox 


J T McGuire 


19^^ 


Yellow Hill 


B.F. Wilcox 


Roy Keller 


CZ AT W^i»t«nn 

VJ.ITX. TT dlSUII 


1934 


Mt. Vernon 


G.W. Gragg 


Roy Keller 


R H Shorp 


193*5 


Grandmother Gap 


G.W. Gragg 


Roy Keller 


W T Cftftk 

▼ ▼•J* \_^Ullli. 


1936 


Mt. Ephraim 


G.W. Gragg 


Roy Keller 


Cflrl Trinlptt 

\_/<ll 1 XI ILIICII. 


1937 


Mt. View 


B.F. Wilcox 


G.M. Watson 


ivay xxcnurix 


193}l 

A J' JO 


Watauga 


Carl Triplett 


F.L. Hampton 




1939 


Laurel Fork 


Carl Triplett 


F.L. Hampton 


W T Cnnh 


1940 


Bailey's Camp 


Carl Triplett 


F.L. Hampton 


AT W^Qtcnn 
Vjr. ITX. TT alaUII 


1941 


Sandy Flat 


Lee J. Church 


N.L. Harrison 


12nv TCpllpr 

XV\^T XVC^lld 


1942 


New Hopewell 


Lee J. Church 


N.L. Harrison 


B.F. Wilcox 


1943 


Boone Fork 


Lee J. Church 


N.L. Harrison 


W. B. Bryant 


1944 


Watauga 


N.L. Harrison 


W.M. Brown 


Frank Knight 


1945 


Laytown 


NX. Harrison 


W.M. Brown 


W.D. Ashley 



1946 Mt. Vernon 

1947 Yellow Hill 

1948 Doe Ridge - No 

1949 Mt. Paran 

1950 Rock Spring 

1951 New Hopewell 

1952 Boone Fork 

1953 East Flats 

1954 Mt. Ephraim 

1955 Bailey's Camp 

1956 Laurel Fork 

1957 Mt. Vernon 
Sandy Flat 

1958 Lay town 
Rock Spring 

1959 New Hopewell 
Long Ridge 

1960 Mt Paran 
Boones Fork 

1961 Watauga 
Yellow Hill 

1962 Mt. Ephraim 
Sandy Flat 

1963 Doe Ridge 
Rock Spring 

1964 Bailey's Camp 
Boone Fork 

1965 Laurel Fork 
Laytown 

1966 Long Ridge 
Mt. Paran 

1967 Mt. Vernon 
New Hopewell 

1968 Rock Spring 
Sandy Flat 

1969 Bailey's Camp 
Boone Fork 

1970 Laurel Fork 
Doe Ridge 

1971 Laytown 
Long Ridge 

1972 Mt. Ephraim 
Mt. Paran 

1973 Mt. Vernon 
New Hopewell 



G.M. Watson 
Theo Hendrix 
minutes, manuscript lost 
Theo Hendrix 
Theo Hendrix 
Theo Hendrix 
G.M. Watson 
Theo Hendrix 
Theo Hendrix 
Theo Hendrix 
Theo Hendrix 

Theo Hendrix 



Theo Hendrix 

Carson Eggers 

Carson Eggers 

Carson Eggers 

Carson Eggers 

Carson Eggers 

E.O. Bustle 

E.O. Bustle 
Archie Clawson 
A.C. Moody 
Archie Clawson 
Archie Clawson 
A.C. Moody 
Archie Clawson 
Lewis Hodges 
Lewis Hodges 
Lewis Hodges 
Lewis Hodges 
David Austin 
David Austin 
David Austin 
David Austin 
Marvin Saunders 
Marvin Saunders 



W. M. Brown 
G.M. Watson 
at printers 

G.M. Watson 
N.L. Harrison 
N. L. Harrison 
J. Merritt Coffey 
G.M. Watson 
G.M. Watson 
G.M. Watson 
J.Merritt Coffey 

J.Merritt Coffey 

J. M. Coffey 

J.Merritt Coffey 

J.M. Coffey 

J. M. Coffey 



W.D. Ashley 
Roscoe Greene 

Roscoe Greene 
R.L. Barnes 
Barney Oliver 
W.J. Cook 
R.L. Barnes 
Lloyd Duller 
W.J. Cook 
W.M. Brown 

W.J. Cook 

Carson Eggers 

W.J. Cook 

Wendell Critcher 



Dupree Gowan 
Winifred Hampton Roby McNeil 
Winifred Hampton W.M. Brown 
Mrs.Clark Story W.M. Quinn 



Mrs. Clark Story 
Mrs. Clark Story 
Mrs. Clark Story 
Mrs. Clark Story 
Mrs. Clark Story 
Mrs. Clark Story 
Mrs. Clark Story 
Mrs. Clark Story 
Mrs. Clark Story 
Barbara West 
Barbara West 
Barbara West 
Barbara West 
Barbara West 
Barbara West 
Barbara West 
Barbara West 



W.M. Brown 
Phillip Martin 
Pete Vannoy 
Basil Tester 
E.O. Bustle 
A.C. Moody 
R. Matheson 
Lewis Hodges 
Herring Crisp 
Davis Austin 
Archie Clawson 
Ray TurbyfiU 
Sherrill Welborn 
Gurney Robbins 
A. C. Moody 
Everette Watson 
Sherrill Welborn 



1974 


Rock Spring 


Marvin Saunders 


Barbara West 


Merle Johnson 




Sandy Flat 


Marvin Saunders 


Barbara West 


Dale Milstead 


1975 


Yellow Hill 


Merle Johnson 


Barbara West 


Dean Hodges 




Bailey's Camp 


Merle Johnson 


Barbara West 


Max West 


1976 


Boone Fork 


Charles Craig 


Barbara West 


A.C. Moody 




Doe Ridge 


Charles Craig 


Barbara West 


Lloyd Hollman 


1977 


Laurel Fork 


Charles Craig 


Barbara West 


Raymond Hendrix 




Laytown 


Charles Craig 


Barbara West 


Max West 


1978 


Long Ridge 


Charles Craig 


Barbara West 


Phillip Martin 




Mt. Ephraim 


Charles Craig 


Barbara West 


A.C. Moody 


1979 


Mt. Vernon 


Max West 


Barbara West 


Harold Bean 




Boone Fork 


Max West 


Barbara West 


Harold Danner 


1980 


Mt. Paron 


Max West 


Barbara West 


Jim Lambert 




New Hopewell 


Max West 


Barbara West 


Burl Jones 


1981 


Rock Spring 


Max West 


Barbara West 


Cannon Ward 




Sandy Flat 


Max West 


Barbara West 


Jim Lambert 


1982 


Watauga 


Max West 


Barbara West 


Jack White 




Bailey's Camp 


Max West 


Barbara West 


Cecil Gragg 


1983 


Boone Fork 


Jack White 


Barbara West 


Burl Jones 




Doe Ridge 


Jack White 


Barbara West 


J.R. Robbins 


1984 


Laurel Fork 


Jack White 


Linda Mills 


Jack White 




Laytown 


Jack White 


Linda Mills 


Ed Greene 


1985 


Long Ridge 


J. R. Robbins 


Linda Mills 


Scott Church 




Mt. Ephraim 


J. R Robbins 


Linda Mills 


Ed Greene 


1986 


Rock Spring 


J. R. Robbins 


Linda Mills 


Scott Church 




Sandy Flat 


J.R. Robbins 


Linda Mills 


Max West 


1987 


Bailey's Camp 


J. R. Robbins 


Linda Mills 


Greg Mathis 




Boone Fork 


J.R. Robbins 


Linda Mills 


Everette Little 


1988 


Doe Ridge 


Scott Church 


Linda Mills 


Kenneth Ridings 




Laytown 


Scott Church 


Linda Mills 


Carter Moretz 


1989 


Long Ridge 


Scott Church 


Linda Mills 


Alex Booth 




Mt. Ephraim 


Scott Church 


Linda Mills 


Carter Moretz 


1990 


Rock Spring 


George Berry 


Linda Mills 


Scott Church 




Sandy Flat 


George Berry 


Linda Mills 


Max West 


1991 


Bailey's Camp 


George Berry 


Linda Mills 


Jimmy Hubbard 




Boone Fork 


George Berry 


Linda Mils 


Eugene Fillers 


1992 


Doe Ridge 


George Berry 


Linda Mills 


Arvil Hardy 




Laytown 


George Berry 


Linda Mills 


Dennis Geouge 


1993 


Long Ridge 


Max West 


Linda Mills 


John McCoury 




Mt. Ephraim 


Max West 


Linda Mills 


Sherrill Dunn 


1994 


Rock Spring 


Max West 


Linda Mills 


Richard Baird 




Sandy Flat 


Max West 


Linda Mills 


Leon Silver 


1995 


Bailey's Camp 


Ron Burgett 


Linda Mills 


Max West 




Doe Ridge 


Ron Burgett 


Linda Mills 


Arvil Hardy 


1996 


Laytown 


Ron Burgett 


Linda Mills 


Danny Murphy 





Long Ridge 


Ron Burgett 


Linda Mills 


John McCoury 


1997 


Mt. Ephraim 


Rov Kanupp 


Linda Mills 


Tim Dockery 




Rock Spring 


Roy Kanupp 


Linda Mills 


Ron Burgett 


1998 


Sandy Flat 


Roy Kanupp 


Linda Mills 


Tim Dockery 




Bailey's Camp 


Roy Kanupp 


Linda Mills 


Max West 


1999 


Doe Ridge 


Tim Dockery 


Linda Mills 


Arvile Hardy 




Laytov/n 


Tim Dockery 


Linda Mills 


Roy Kanupp 


2000 


Mt. Ephraim 


Roy Kanupp 


Linda Mills 


Max West 




Rock Spring 


Roy Kanupp 


Linda Mills 


Roy Kanupp 



The churches; Buffalo Cove, Cool Springs, Wilkes County Elk, Stony Fork, and Yellow 
Hill, formerly belonging to other associations. 

Met at the Stony Fork Baptist Church and organized the Stony Fork Baptist Association 
on November 9th and 10th., 1880. For this meeting, appointed Elder Larkin Hodges, 
moderator and Brother Elijah Trivette, Clerk.